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News Article | May 12, 2017
Site: www.futurity.org

Advising someone to “walk a mile in their shoes” as a way to get them to empathize with others may be bad advice for their emotional health, according to a new study. “That’s because there are two routes to empathy and one of them is more personally distressing and upsetting than the other,” says Michael Poulin, associate professor in the University at Buffalo psychology department and coauthor of the study in the Journal of Experimental Psychology. The findings, based on stress physiology measures, add a new and previously unexplored dimension to understanding how choosing a path to empathy can affect a helper’s health and well-being. The study’s conclusions provide important insights into areas ranging from training doctors to raising children. The routes to empathy Poulin mentions diverge at the point of the helper’s perspective. The two may sound similar, but actually turn out to be quite different in terms of how they affect the person who is trying to help another. One approach observes and infers how someone feels. This is imagine-other perspective-taking (IOPT). The other way to empathize is for helpers to put themselves into someone else’s situation, the imagined “walking a mile” scenario. This is imagine-self perspective-taking (ISPT). “You can think about another person’s feelings without taking those feelings upon yourself (IOPT),” says Poulin. “But I begin to feel sad once I go down the mental pathway of putting myself into the place of someone who is feeling sad (ISPT). “I think sometimes we all avoid engaging in empathy for others who are suffering partially because taking on someone else’s burdens (ISPT) could be unpleasant. On the other hand, it seems a much better way to proceed is if it’s possible to show empathy simply by acknowledging another person’s feelings without it being aversive (IOPT).” Some previous research has tried to get at the question of stress relative to IOPT and ISPT by asking people to report how they felt after a helping behavior. But the current study breaks new ground by examining the effects of perspective taking while someone is engaged in helping behavior. “I have some degree of uncertainty about how well people are parsing out the distinction when reporting how much they were feeling for themselves versus the other person,” says Poulin. That uncertainty motivated the current study’s design, which measured a cardiovascular response that reliably indicates the difference between feeling personally anxious or not. “When we are feeling threatened or anxious, some peripheral blood vessels constrict making it harder for the heart to pump blood through the body,” says Poulin. “We can detect this in the lab and what we found is that people who engaged in ISPT had greater levels of this threat response compared to people who engaged in IOPT.” This conclusion could be especially useful in the context of medical professions, like doctors and nurses, especially in areas with high rates of burnout, according to Poulin. “Many of these professionals see so much pain and suffering that it eventually affects their careers,” he says. “That might be the result of habitually engaging in ISPT. They put themselves in their patients’ shoes. “Maybe we can train doctors and nurses to engage in IOPT so they can continue to be empathetic toward their patients without that empathy creating a burden.” Poulin says this applies as well to teachers and students, social workers and clients. “In fact, now that we’re transitioning to such a service economy, it’s nearly everybody: technical support, complaint hotline operators, restaurant servers.” Parents might even consider the study’s finding when thinking about how they speaking to their children in certain circumstances. “Rather than saying to a child, ‘How would you feel if that were done to you?’ maybe we should be saying, ‘Think about how that person is feeling.'” Psychologist Anneke E.K. Buffone of the University of Pennsylvnia, a PhD student at the University at Buffalo when the research took place, led the study.


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

UB researcher says how we arrive at empathy is as important as being empathetic BUFFALO, N.Y. - When it comes to empathy, the idiom that suggests "walking a mile in their shoes" turns out to be problematic advice, according to new research published in the Journal of Experimental Psychology. "That's because there are two routes to empathy and one of them is more personally distressing and upsetting than the other," says Michael Poulin, an associate professor in the University at Buffalo Department of Psychology and co-author of the study led by University of Pennsylvania psychologist Anneke E.K. Buffone, who was a PhD student at UB when the research was conducted. The findings, based on stress physiology measures, add a new and previously unexplored dimension to understanding how choosing a path to empathy can affect a helper's health and well-being. The study's conclusions provide important insights into areas ranging from training doctors to raising children. The routes to empathy Poulin mentions diverge at the point of the helper's perspective. The two may sound similar, but actually turn out to be quite different in terms of how they affect the person who is trying to help another. One approach observes and infers how someone feels. This is imagine-other perspective-taking (IOPT). The other way to empathize is for helpers to put themselves into someone else's situation, the imagined "walking a mile" scenario. This is imagine-self perspective-taking (ISPT). "You can think about another person's feelings without taking those feelings upon yourself (IOPT)," says Poulin. "But I begin to feel sad once I go down the mental pathway of putting myself into the place of someone who is feeling sad (ISPT). "I think sometimes we all avoid engaging in empathy for others who are suffering partially because taking on someone else's burdens (ISPT) could be unpleasant. On the other hand, it seems a much better way to proceed is if it's possible to show empathy simply by acknowledging another person's feelings without it being aversive (IOPT)." Some previous research has tried to get at the question of stress relative to IOPT and ISPT by asking people to report how they felt after a helping behavior. But the current study breaks new ground by examining the effects of perspective taking while someone is engaged in helping behavior. "I have some degree of uncertainty about how well people are parsing out the distinction when reporting how much they were feeling for themselves versus the other person," says Poulin. That uncertainty motivated the current study's design, which measured a cardiovascular response that reliably indicates the difference between feeling personally anxious or not. "When we are feeling threatened or anxious, some peripheral blood vessels constrict making it harder for the heart to pump blood through the body," says Poulin. "We can detect this in the lab and what we found is that people who engaged in ISPT had greater levels of this threat response compared to people who engaged in IOPT." This conclusion could be especially useful in the context of medical professions, like doctors and nurses, especially in areas with high rates of burnout, according to Poulin. "Many of these professionals see so much pain and suffering that it eventually affects their careers," he says. "That might be the result of habitually engaging in ISPT. They put themselves in their patients' shoes. "Maybe we can train doctors and nurses to engage in IOPT so they can continue to be empathetic toward their patients without that empathy creating a burden." says this applies as well to teachers and students, social workers and clients. "In fact, now that we're transitioning to such a service economy, it's nearly everybody: technical support, complaint hotline operators, restaurant servers." Parents might even consider the study's finding when thinking about how they speaking to their children in certain circumstances. "Rather than saying to a child, 'How would you feel if that were done to you?' maybe we should be saying, 'Think about how that person is feeling.'"


News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Many contributors to patient satisfaction, such as sociodemographics and psychological factors, are beyond the physician's control BUFFALO, N.Y. -- Patient satisfaction is playing an increasingly important role in evaluating the quality of health care and reimbursing physicians for it. Exactly what drives that satisfaction has been difficult to determine. A new University at Buffalo study of 483 patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) revealed that many factors that contribute to patient satisfaction are beyond the doctor's control. The results of the study were presented in Chicago today (May 9) at Digestive Disease Week during the Clinical Practice Distinguished Abstract Plenary. The study's title is "(Can't Get No) Patient Satisfaction: The Predictive Power of Demographic, GI and Psychological Factors in IBS Patients." "Ideally, patient satisfaction should be strictly based on how care is delivered," said Jeffrey Lackner, PsyD, professor in the Department of Medicine in the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at UB and senior author on the study. "But patient satisfaction is a subjective construct that is influenced by factors beyond quality of care." Lackner directs UB's Behavioral Medicine Clinic where he and his colleagues treat patients with a variety of painful disorders, including IBS. He also is a researcher with the Clinical and Translational Science Institute at UB, funded by a National Institutes of Health Clinical and Translational Science Award. In the UB study, 16 percent of participants said they were "very satisfied" with prior care for their digestive problems, while those who rated their experience as either below average or average to good was the same, at 42 percent each. Participants were asked to rate their experience on a scale of 0 to 10 with 0 being the worst health care possible and 10 the best health care possible. Surprisingly, the researchers found that patient satisfaction for these IBS patients was unrelated to either the severity or duration of their IBS symptoms or the impact that IBS had on their lives. Lackner noted that while patient satisfaction has proven difficult to characterize, it has far-reaching implications for many aspects of the doctor-patient relationship including patient loyalty, adherence to treatment, readmission rates and the potential for malpractice. In addition, it is becoming an increasingly important criterion for determining how care will be reimbursed. "Patient satisfaction is a significant metric that impacts reimbursement as health care emphasizes the value of care not the volume of care," Lackner explained. The goals of the study were to assess how patient factors, gastrointestinal symptoms and conditions and other physical and psychological factors impact patient satisfaction among IBS patients. Because IBS is a difficult and complex disorder that is associated with high rates of coexisting illnesses, Lackner said that gastroenterologists may be at a disadvantage in reimbursement schemes that focus on patient satisfaction ratings that can be influenced by nondigestive health factors. "We began this study because we don't really know what drives patient satisfaction for functional gastrointestinal disorders like IBS," he said. In the first part of their study, the UB researchers found that the more diagnostic tests (such as colonoscopies) that patients underwent, the more satisfied they were, but that finding seemed to be driven by whether or not a patient saw a gastroenterologist. "When we introduced into the model whether or not the patient had seen a gastroenterologist, the power of tests to predict patient satisfaction went away," Lackner explained. "This leads us to believe that for this population, the gastroenterologist provides reassurance that the patient doesn't have a life-threatening disease. So the reassurance they get from gastroenterologists is what predicts patient satisfaction, not the number of tests they undergo." Eighty percent of participants were female and the average age was 41. Participants were being evaluated for a large, multicenter National Institutes of Health-funded trial Lackner is leading that will evaluate the efficacy of non-drug treatments for IBS patients. "The bottom line is, there are a lot of factors that influence patient satisfaction and it turns out that many of them are not part of the delivery of care," said Lackner. UB co-authors on the study are Chris Sova; Rebecca Firth; Anne Marie Carosella, PhD; Gregory Gudleski, PhD; Leonard Katz, MD; Susan Krasner, PhD; Brian Quigley, PhD; Michael Sitrin, MD; Chris Radziwon, PhD. Darren Brenner, MD, of Northwestern University, Laurie Keefer, PhD, of Mt. Sinai and Jim Jaccard, PhD, of New York University, were also co-authors. The research was funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases of the NIH. Founded in 1846, the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at the University at Buffalo is beginning a new chapter in its history with the largest medical education building under construction in the nation. The eight-story, 628,000-square-foot facility is scheduled to open in 2017. The new location puts superior medical education, clinical care and pioneering research in close proximity, anchoring Buffalo's evolving comprehensive academic health center in a vibrant downtown setting. These new facilities will better enable the school to advance health and wellness across the life span for the people of New York and the world through research, clinical care and the education of tomorrow's leaders in health care and biomedical sciences. The school's faculty and residents provide care for the community's diverse populations through strong clinical partnerships and the school's practice plan, UBMD Physicians' Group.


Portfolio of Next Generation Heart Failure Devices Offers Effective Pacing and Access to the Most Advanced Diagnostic Imaging Procedures DUBLIN - May 10, 2017 - Medtronic plc (NYSE:MDT) has received U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for a portfolio of quadripolar cardiac resynchronization therapy-pacemakers (CRT-Ps) that improve therapy delivery for patients with heart failure. These devices also allow patients to receive MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scans in either 1.5 or 3 Tesla (T) machines. The Percepta(TM) Quad CRT-P MRI SureScan(TM), Serena(TM) Quad CRT-P MRI SureScan(TM) and Solara(TM) Quad CRT-P MRI SureScan(TM)are expected to be available commercially in the United States in early summer 2017. "These new pacemakers allow clinicians to provide more personalized therapy treatment options," said Anne B. Curtis, M.D., chair of the Department of Medicine, University at Buffalo, NY. "Their ability to automatically adjust pacing to meet the patient's needs, even those who are among the most difficult to treat, is an example of how advanced implanted heart device technology has become." The Percepta Quad CRT-P features the EffectivCRT(TM) Diagnostic, which automatically determines the effectiveness of each left ventricular pace, and the EffectivCRT(TM) during AF algorithm, which automatically adjusts pacing rates during atrial fibrillation (AF). It also includes VectorExpress(TM) 2.0, an automated in-office test that reduces lead programing to two minutes1, and reveals clinically actionable information to help physicians select optimal pacing configurations for each patient. The Percepta Quad and Serena Quad CRT-Ps also feature the Medtronic-exclusive AdaptivCRT(TM) algorithm, which reduces a patient's odds of a 30-day heart failure readmission by 59 percent2, and has demonstrated a 46 percent reduction in AF risk compared to echo-optimized biventricular pacing3. Multiple point pacing, which can stimulate the left ventricle (lower chamber) at two sites, is also available on both devices, as well as on the company's Claria MRI(TM) Quad CRT-D SureScan(TM) and Amplia MRI(TM) Quad CRT-D SureScan(TM). All three CRT-Ps also are compatible with Attain(TM) Performa(TM) MRI SureScan(TM) Quadripolar Leads, which include short bipolar spacing to reduce the occurrence of phrenic nerve stimulation4, steroid on all electrodes, and three shapes for varying patient anatomies. They also employ the Medtronic-exclusive PhysioCurve(TM) contoured design, which reduces overall skin pressure compared to non-contoured devices5, for enhanced patient comfort6 and improved cosmetic appearance of the implant site7. This CRT-P portfolio received CE (Conformité Européenne) Mark in February 2017. "Developing cardiac devices so physicians have the best treatment options to meet the individual needs of their patients is at the core of everything we do," said David Steinhaus, M.D., vice president and general manager of the Heart Failure business, which is part of the Cardiac and Vascular Group at Medtronic. "With FDA approval of these quadripolar CRT-P devices, we can offer the most innovative pacing technology for improved patient outcomes and enhanced design for their comfort." In collaboration with leading clinicians, researchers and scientists worldwide, Medtronic offers the broadest range of innovative medical technology for the interventional and surgical treatment of cardiovascular disease and cardiac arrhythmias. The company strives to offer products and services of the highest quality that deliver clinical and economic value to healthcare consumers and providers around the world. Medtronic plc (www.medtronic.com), headquartered in Dublin, Ireland, is among the world's largest medical technology, services and solutions companies - alleviating pain, restoring health and extending life for millions of people around the world. Medtronic employs more than 88,000 people worldwide, serving physicians, hospitals and patients in approximately 160 countries. The company is focused on collaborating with stakeholders around the world to take healthcare Further, Together. Any forward-looking statements are subject to risks and uncertainties such as those described in Medtronic's periodic reports on file with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Actual results may differ materially from anticipated results. 1 Demmer, W. VectorExpress performance results. Medtronic data on file. January 2013. 2 Starling RC, Krum H, Bril S, et al. Impact of a Novel Adaptive Optimization Algorithm on 30-Day Readmissions: Evidence From the Adaptive CRT Trial. JACC Heart Fail. July 2015;3(7):565-572. 3 Martin D, et al. Clinical outcomes with adaptive cardiac resynchronization therapy: Long-term outcomes of the Adaptive CRT Trial. HFSA Annual Scientific Meeting. September 23, 2013. 4 Biffi et al. Effort of bipolar electrode spacing on phrenic nerve stimulation and left ventricular pacing thresholds: An acute canine study. Circulation Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology. 2012. 5 Flo D, et al. IS4/DF4 Device Shape Analysis. Medtronic data on file. January 2013.  6 Ceelen KK, et al. J Biomech. 2008;41:3399-3404. 7 Gold MR, et al. J Am Coll Cardiol. 1996;28;1278-1282.


Portfolio of Next Generation Heart Failure Devices Offers Effective Pacing and Access to the Most Advanced Diagnostic Imaging Procedures DUBLIN - May 10, 2017 - Medtronic plc (NYSE:MDT) has received U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for a portfolio of quadripolar cardiac resynchronization therapy-pacemakers (CRT-Ps) that improve therapy delivery for patients with heart failure. These devices also allow patients to receive MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scans in either 1.5 or 3 Tesla (T) machines. The Percepta(TM) Quad CRT-P MRI SureScan(TM), Serena(TM) Quad CRT-P MRI SureScan(TM) and Solara(TM) Quad CRT-P MRI SureScan(TM)are expected to be available commercially in the United States in early summer 2017. "These new pacemakers allow clinicians to provide more personalized therapy treatment options," said Anne B. Curtis, M.D., chair of the Department of Medicine, University at Buffalo, NY. "Their ability to automatically adjust pacing to meet the patient's needs, even those who are among the most difficult to treat, is an example of how advanced implanted heart device technology has become." The Percepta Quad CRT-P features the EffectivCRT(TM) Diagnostic, which automatically determines the effectiveness of each left ventricular pace, and the EffectivCRT(TM) during AF algorithm, which automatically adjusts pacing rates during atrial fibrillation (AF). It also includes VectorExpress(TM) 2.0, an automated in-office test that reduces lead programing to two minutes1, and reveals clinically actionable information to help physicians select optimal pacing configurations for each patient. The Percepta Quad and Serena Quad CRT-Ps also feature the Medtronic-exclusive AdaptivCRT(TM) algorithm, which reduces a patient's odds of a 30-day heart failure readmission by 59 percent2, and has demonstrated a 46 percent reduction in AF risk compared to echo-optimized biventricular pacing3. Multiple point pacing, which can stimulate the left ventricle (lower chamber) at two sites, is also available on both devices, as well as on the company's Claria MRI(TM) Quad CRT-D SureScan(TM) and Amplia MRI(TM) Quad CRT-D SureScan(TM). All three CRT-Ps also are compatible with Attain(TM) Performa(TM) MRI SureScan(TM) Quadripolar Leads, which include short bipolar spacing to reduce the occurrence of phrenic nerve stimulation4, steroid on all electrodes, and three shapes for varying patient anatomies. They also employ the Medtronic-exclusive PhysioCurve(TM) contoured design, which reduces overall skin pressure compared to non-contoured devices5, for enhanced patient comfort6 and improved cosmetic appearance of the implant site7. This CRT-P portfolio received CE (Conformité Européenne) Mark in February 2017. "Developing cardiac devices so physicians have the best treatment options to meet the individual needs of their patients is at the core of everything we do," said David Steinhaus, M.D., vice president and general manager of the Heart Failure business, which is part of the Cardiac and Vascular Group at Medtronic. "With FDA approval of these quadripolar CRT-P devices, we can offer the most innovative pacing technology for improved patient outcomes and enhanced design for their comfort." In collaboration with leading clinicians, researchers and scientists worldwide, Medtronic offers the broadest range of innovative medical technology for the interventional and surgical treatment of cardiovascular disease and cardiac arrhythmias. The company strives to offer products and services of the highest quality that deliver clinical and economic value to healthcare consumers and providers around the world. Medtronic plc (www.medtronic.com), headquartered in Dublin, Ireland, is among the world's largest medical technology, services and solutions companies - alleviating pain, restoring health and extending life for millions of people around the world. Medtronic employs more than 88,000 people worldwide, serving physicians, hospitals and patients in approximately 160 countries. The company is focused on collaborating with stakeholders around the world to take healthcare Further, Together. Any forward-looking statements are subject to risks and uncertainties such as those described in Medtronic's periodic reports on file with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Actual results may differ materially from anticipated results. 1 Demmer, W. VectorExpress performance results. Medtronic data on file. January 2013. 2 Starling RC, Krum H, Bril S, et al. Impact of a Novel Adaptive Optimization Algorithm on 30-Day Readmissions: Evidence From the Adaptive CRT Trial. JACC Heart Fail. July 2015;3(7):565-572. 3 Martin D, et al. Clinical outcomes with adaptive cardiac resynchronization therapy: Long-term outcomes of the Adaptive CRT Trial. HFSA Annual Scientific Meeting. September 23, 2013. 4 Biffi et al. Effort of bipolar electrode spacing on phrenic nerve stimulation and left ventricular pacing thresholds: An acute canine study. Circulation Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology. 2012. 5 Flo D, et al. IS4/DF4 Device Shape Analysis. Medtronic data on file. January 2013.  6 Ceelen KK, et al. J Biomech. 2008;41:3399-3404. 7 Gold MR, et al. J Am Coll Cardiol. 1996;28;1278-1282.


News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Phillips Lytle LLP named Dennis W. Elsenbeck Head of Energy and Sustainability to lead Phillips Lytle Energy Consulting, a newly created service offered by the firm. Mr. Elsenbeck will be based in the firm’s Buffalo office, and will provide consulting services to clients in all eight offices across the firm’s footprint. Prior to joining Phillips Lytle, Mr. Elsenbeck served as Director of Stakeholder and Policy for National Grid U.S. Operations. He brings more than 30 years of experience in the energy industry to Phillips Lytle. Mr. Elsenbeck’s background includes experience in the three key areas of the energy industry – supply, delivery and demand – bringing a unique perspective in ensuring alignment of market needs, applied technology and sustainable energy policy. “Any time we can add new, valuable perspectives from a veteran industry insider, it is to the benefit of our clients,” said David P. Flynn, Phillips Lytle partner and practice team leader for the firm’s Energy and Environment Practice Teams. “Dennis has unparalleled energy industry knowledge and contacts, and will be a tremendous asset for our wide range of sophisticated clients.” “Phillips Lytle’s Energy Practice Team is among the best in the business, with a very diverse, high caliber client base,” said Mr. Elsenbeck. “Energy is a rapidly changing industry. I look forward to working with the firm’s attorneys on a number of initiatives, and to being a resource for clients as they navigate the complex policies and regulations surrounding the energy industry.” Phillips Lytle Energy Consulting will provide resources in a variety of areas including: “We have an opportunity to develop the market’s voice in the policy conversation,” said Mr. Elsenbeck. “The market stakeholders, technology innovators and policy makers need to be working in lock step to achieve synergy in the creation of a well-organized, cohesive energy plan that makes sense for all stakeholders.” Mr. Elsenbeck received his Master’s in Engineering from University at Buffalo, as well as his Master’s in Business Administration from University of Rochester. He received a Bachelor’s of Technology from SUNY Institute of Technology. Phillips Lytle LLP is a premier regional law firm that is recognized nationally for its legal excellence. With offices in New York State, Washington, D.C., and Canada, our attorneys serve a multinational client base including FORTUNE 1000 companies, global and regional financial institutions, not-for-profit organizations, middle market companies, startups, entrepreneurs and individuals on important matters affecting their businesses and personal wealth. For more information, visit http://www.phillipslytle.com.


Portfolio of Next Generation Heart Failure Devices Offers Effective Pacing and Access to the Most Advanced Diagnostic Imaging Procedures DUBLIN - May 10, 2017 - Medtronic plc (NYSE:MDT) has received U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for a portfolio of quadripolar cardiac resynchronization therapy-pacemakers (CRT-Ps) that improve therapy delivery for patients with heart failure. These devices also allow patients to receive MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scans in either 1.5 or 3 Tesla (T) machines. The Percepta(TM) Quad CRT-P MRI SureScan(TM), Serena(TM) Quad CRT-P MRI SureScan(TM) and Solara(TM) Quad CRT-P MRI SureScan(TM)are expected to be available commercially in the United States in early summer 2017. "These new pacemakers allow clinicians to provide more personalized therapy treatment options," said Anne B. Curtis, M.D., chair of the Department of Medicine, University at Buffalo, NY. "Their ability to automatically adjust pacing to meet the patient's needs, even those who are among the most difficult to treat, is an example of how advanced implanted heart device technology has become." The Percepta Quad CRT-P features the EffectivCRT(TM) Diagnostic, which automatically determines the effectiveness of each left ventricular pace, and the EffectivCRT(TM) during AF algorithm, which automatically adjusts pacing rates during atrial fibrillation (AF). It also includes VectorExpress(TM) 2.0, an automated in-office test that reduces lead programing to two minutes1, and reveals clinically actionable information to help physicians select optimal pacing configurations for each patient. The Percepta Quad and Serena Quad CRT-Ps also feature the Medtronic-exclusive AdaptivCRT(TM) algorithm, which reduces a patient's odds of a 30-day heart failure readmission by 59 percent2, and has demonstrated a 46 percent reduction in AF risk compared to echo-optimized biventricular pacing3. Multiple point pacing, which can stimulate the left ventricle (lower chamber) at two sites, is also available on both devices, as well as on the company's Claria MRI(TM) Quad CRT-D SureScan(TM) and Amplia MRI(TM) Quad CRT-D SureScan(TM). All three CRT-Ps also are compatible with Attain(TM) Performa(TM) MRI SureScan(TM) Quadripolar Leads, which include short bipolar spacing to reduce the occurrence of phrenic nerve stimulation4, steroid on all electrodes, and three shapes for varying patient anatomies. They also employ the Medtronic-exclusive PhysioCurve(TM) contoured design, which reduces overall skin pressure compared to non-contoured devices5, for enhanced patient comfort6 and improved cosmetic appearance of the implant site7. This CRT-P portfolio received CE (Conformité Européenne) Mark in February 2017. "Developing cardiac devices so physicians have the best treatment options to meet the individual needs of their patients is at the core of everything we do," said David Steinhaus, M.D., vice president and general manager of the Heart Failure business, which is part of the Cardiac and Vascular Group at Medtronic. "With FDA approval of these quadripolar CRT-P devices, we can offer the most innovative pacing technology for improved patient outcomes and enhanced design for their comfort." In collaboration with leading clinicians, researchers and scientists worldwide, Medtronic offers the broadest range of innovative medical technology for the interventional and surgical treatment of cardiovascular disease and cardiac arrhythmias. The company strives to offer products and services of the highest quality that deliver clinical and economic value to healthcare consumers and providers around the world. Medtronic plc (www.medtronic.com), headquartered in Dublin, Ireland, is among the world's largest medical technology, services and solutions companies - alleviating pain, restoring health and extending life for millions of people around the world. Medtronic employs more than 88,000 people worldwide, serving physicians, hospitals and patients in approximately 160 countries. The company is focused on collaborating with stakeholders around the world to take healthcare Further, Together. Any forward-looking statements are subject to risks and uncertainties such as those described in Medtronic's periodic reports on file with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Actual results may differ materially from anticipated results. 1 Demmer, W. VectorExpress performance results. Medtronic data on file. January 2013. 2 Starling RC, Krum H, Bril S, et al. Impact of a Novel Adaptive Optimization Algorithm on 30-Day Readmissions: Evidence From the Adaptive CRT Trial. JACC Heart Fail. July 2015;3(7):565-572. 3 Martin D, et al. Clinical outcomes with adaptive cardiac resynchronization therapy: Long-term outcomes of the Adaptive CRT Trial. HFSA Annual Scientific Meeting. September 23, 2013. 4 Biffi et al. Effort of bipolar electrode spacing on phrenic nerve stimulation and left ventricular pacing thresholds: An acute canine study. Circulation Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology. 2012. 5 Flo D, et al. IS4/DF4 Device Shape Analysis. Medtronic data on file. January 2013.  6 Ceelen KK, et al. J Biomech. 2008;41:3399-3404. 7 Gold MR, et al. J Am Coll Cardiol. 1996;28;1278-1282.


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.24-7pressrelease.com

BUFFALO, NY, May 11, 2017-- Michelle Linder has been included in Marquis Who's Who. As in all Marquis Who's Who biographical volumes, individuals profiled are selected on the basis of current reference value. Factors such as position, noteworthy accomplishments, visibility, and prominence in a field are all taken into account during the selection process.Michelle Linder is a graduate research assistant at the State University of New York at Buffalo, where she is pursuing a Ph.D. in medicinal chemistry. Her current research focuses on the synthesis and use of various heavy chalcogen-containing rhodamine dyes as photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy, extracorporeal photopheresis, and dye-sensitized solar cells. Ms. Linder has been a graduate research assistant since 2012. From 2012 to 2015, she was also a teaching assistant at the school. Ms. Linder graduated summa cum laude from SUNY Oneonta in 2012 with a Bachelor of Science in chemistry. In 2010, she earned an advanced tutor certification through the College Reading and Learning Association.Ms. Linder has utilized her knowledge and research to co-author a number of publications in the past few years. These include "Luminescence spectroscopy of chalcogen substituted rhodamine cations in vacuo," published in Photochemical & Photobiological Sciences in 2017, "Targeting T Cell Bioenergetics by Modulating P-Glycoprotein Selectivity Depletes Alloreactive T Cells to Prevent Graft-Versus-Host Disease," published in the Journal of Immunology in 2016, "Extended Rhodamine Photosensitizers for Photodynamic Therapy of Cancer Cells," published in Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry in 2016, and "Selective Photodepletion of Malignant T Cells in Extracorporeal Photopheresis with Selenorhodamine Photosensitizers," also published in Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry in 2016. She is also a co-author of "Selenorhodamine Photosensitizers with the Texas-red Core for Photodynamic Therapy of Cancer Cells," published in Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry in 2015, "Selenorhodamine Photosensitizers for Photodynamic Therapy of P-Glycoprotein-Expressing Cancer Cells," published in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry in 2014, and "Synthesis and Properties of Heavy Chalcogen Analogues of the Texas Reds and Related Rhodamines," published in Organometallics in 2014.A member of the Omicron Delta Kappa National Honor Society, Ms. Linder also remains active with the American Chemical Society. She has received numerous awards and honors over the years in light of her effort and achievements in the field of chemistry. Most recently, Ms. Linder received the Graduate Student Excellence in Teaching Award from the University of Buffalo's Graduate School. She is also a recipient of the Speyer Fellowship, the Jere Solo Fellowship, the Presidential Fellowship, and the Gordon Harris Fellowship from the University at Buffalo's Department of Chemistry. In 2014, she was honored with the department's Mattern-Tyler Teaching Award as well. In 2012, Ms. Linder received the SUNY Chancellor's Award, as well as an Academic Achievement Award in chemistry and biochemistry from the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs at SUNY Oneonta. She was bestowed the Joseph Breen Memorial Fellowship from the American Chemical Society's Green Chemistry Institute in 2011. Ms. Linder aims for continued achievements in the field of chemistry as she moves forward in her career.For more information about Ms. Linder, please visit https://www.linkedin.com/in/michelleklinder About Marquis Who's Who :Since 1899, when A. N. Marquis printed the First Edition of Who's Who in America , Marquis Who's Who has chronicled the lives of the most accomplished individuals and innovators from every significant field of endeavor, including politics, business, medicine, law, education, art, religion and entertainment. Today, Who's Who in America remains an essential biographical source for thousands of researchers, journalists, librarians and executive search firms around the world. Marquis now publishes many Who's Who titles, including Who's Who in America , Who's Who in the World , Who's Who in American Law , Who's Who in Medicine and Healthcare , Who's Who in Science and Engineering , and Who's Who in Asia . Marquis publications may be visited at the official Marquis Who's Who website at www.marquiswhoswho.com


News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: www.futurity.org

Researchers have sequenced the genomes of 80 birch trees, which offer raw material for papermaking, construction, furniture-building, and more. “Birch is one of the major trees for forest products in the Northern Hemisphere. Others, like spruce, pine, and poplar, all have genome sequences, but birch did not—until now,” says biologist Victor Albert of the University at Buffalo. “We sequenced about 80 individuals of one species, Betula pendula, the silver birch,” says Jaakko Kangasjärvi of the University of Helsinki, another co-leader of the study, published in Nature Genetics. “We sampled populations of this species throughout its range, so up and down Finland, down to Germany, over to Norway and Ireland, and all the way up to Siberia.” By analyzing the 80 sequenced genomes, the team was able to identify genetic mutations that may be of interest to industry, including mutations that may affect how well birch trees grow and respond to light at different latitudes and longitudes and under different environmental conditions. The research could be a starting point for breeding trees that better meet the needs of various industries. “What makes a birch tree hardy in different environments? A tree in Finland may die if you plant it in Siberia because plants have local adaptations—specific genetic mutations—that help them survive where they are found,” says Ykä Helariutta of the University of Helsinki, who co-led the study and is also a professor at the University of Cambridge. “An understanding of these natural adaptations can facilitate genetic engineering and artificial selection. That’s why our research could be very useful for forest biotechnology.” In the study, the researchers identified genetic mutations of interest by hunting for distinctive stretches of DNA within the genomes of individual birch trees. Like people, plants inherit two copies of every gene—one from each parent—and these two copies are slightly different from each other. However, in some spots, an organism may have long strips of identical DNA in both copies of a gene. Such stretches of DNA point to genetic regions that are critical to a species’ survival and development, as these regions are the product of “selective sweeps” in which all or most organisms in a geographic location come to depend on a certain genetic trait. When the scientists analyzed the genomes of 80 birch trees from across Europe, they discovered a rich array of selective sweeps in genes that influence important qualities such as tree growth and wood production. Moreover, the team found that some selective sweeps appeared to be associated with various environmental conditions. Two genes that help control how birch trees respond to light—PHYC and FRS10—had notable genetic mutations correlating with latitude, longitude, and temperature, while the mutations in PHYC were also related to precipitation trends. Similar associations were also identified for two genes tied to wood production—KAK and MED5A. (Mutations in these genes were correlated with latitude, longitude, and temperature.) “The selective sweeps we identified may be the basis for local adaptation for different populations of birch,” says Jarkko Salojärvi of the University of Helsinki, a co-leader of the study. “Trees in Siberia are under different selective pressure from trees in Finland, so genes are being tweaked in different ways in these two places to allow these plants to better adjust to their environment.” “The research points to genetic mutations that could be of interest for genetic manipulation for forest products,” says Petri Auvinen of the University of Helsinki, who co-led the study.


News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Big data is a buzzword that is often used in customer behavior analyses or social network modeling. However, big data is also being created in biology, where modern high-throughput DNA sequencing can easily produce loads of data. Exponential decrease in the cost of sequencing during this decade has made it possible to analyze whole populations of organisms instead of a small set or only one selected individual. Population-level data opens up completely new ways of studying the organisms. For example, history of the species can be inferred from patterns imprinted in the genomes by long-term evolution and more recent natural selection. These types of analyses have earlier been carried out for humans where there already exists plenty of data, but the low cost of DNA sequencing makes it now possible to look at altogether different species, such as ones of importance to forestry and Finnish culture. Here, researchers collected birch samples from twelve sites spanning a range from Ireland to the heart of Siberia and from Loppi, southern Finland, up to Kittilä, northern Finland. "The project produced altogether over 700 Gigabases of genome sequence, resulting in over 20 Terabytes of data from various analyses," reports Research Director Petri Auvinen from DNA sequencing and genomics lab. Computational analyses showed population bottlenecks, periods of extremely low number of individuals, at times with known climatic upheaval. The first bottleneck occurred around 66 million years ago (Mya), at the time when dinosaurs became extinct, followed by bottlenecks 34 Mya, 14.5 Mya, and 1 million years ago. "This may be connected with speciation events in birches, since fossil evidence shows that the alders and birches split already around 60 Mya, and the white-barked birches had appeared around 10 million years ago," says Professor Victor Albert. After the last bottleneck the birch population has been steadily increasing. The last ice age split the birches into two populations, a European and a Siberian one, which have been mixing in Finland since the melting of the continental ice sheet. In addition to silver birch, the genomes of six other birch species were also sequenced, as well as two closely related alders, grey and black alder. Making a distinction between diploid silver birches and tetraploid downy birches (which have doubled their genomes compared to diploids) proved to be more difficult than expected, since some of the sampled silver birches themselves turned out to have four sets of chromosomes. "This illustrates that there has been and most likely still is some gene flow between the two species," says researcher Jarkko Salojärvi from the Department of Biosciences. In addition to population genomic analyses, the project assembled a reference genome for silver birch and predicted its genes. "This hybrid assembly combined data from four different next generation sequencing platforms," says researcher Olli-Pekka Smolander. Population genomic analyses identified 900 genes under natural selection, which have evolved birch into its current state as a cold-tolerant and fast-growing pioneer species. Genes under selection are in key positions in the development of birch phenotypes, which is why breeding could focus on these key genes when developing new birch lines for biotechnology purposes. "When the candidate genes have been identified, further breeding is rather rapid since birch is the only tree species that in special growth conditions can be made to flower within less than one year. This makes it possible to grow one breeding population in one year," says Professor Jaakko Kangasjärvi. "A unique trait in a single birch line can result from a mutation in a single gene, for example, the weeping birch cultivar known from gardens, Betula pendula "Youngii", had a truncated LAZY gene," says Professor Yrjö Helariutta. A mutation in this gene is known to produce a relaxed phenotype also in maize and thale cress. The research was carried out by D.Sc Jarkko Salojärvi and Professor Jaakko Kangasjärvi (Dept. Biosciences, University of Helsinki, Finland), D.Sc Olli-Pekka Smolander and Petri Auvinen (Institute of Biotechnology, University of Helsinki , Finland), Professor Yrjö Helariutta (Dept. Biosciences and Institute of Biotechnology, University of Helsinki and Sainsbury laboratories, Cambridge, UK), and Professor Victor Albert (University at Buffalo, USA). The gene models were curated by researchers from University of Helsinki, University of Turku, University of Eastern Finland, Estonian University of Life Sciences, Umeå University, and the Natural Resources Institute of Finland.

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