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News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

SANTA CLARA, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Open-NFP, a worldwide, community-driven organization focused on research and development in datapath offloads and acceleration for SDN and NFV applications, announced today that it will host the upcoming Dataplane Acceleration Developer Day (DXDD) Europe on June 7 in Utrecht, the Netherlands. Open-NFP is experiencing significant demand for furthering dataplane acceleration education and hand-on training for the commercial and research community within Europe to foster next-generation, high-performance SDN and NFV solutions and applications. The DXDD Europe will bring together researchers, developers, students and industry affiliates for hands-on training that satisfies a critical modern data center need: the ability to change the network behavior of COTS server networking hardware at the speed at which one can change software. Since its inception and the first annual developer conference in 2015, Open-NFP membership has grown and now hosts over 35 open research and development projects from academia and industry. Relevant software and sample datapath libraries are all hosted on GitHub, enabling collaborative development across distributed teams. Many organizations and universities have contributed from within Europe including Airbus, Cambridge University, Fraunhofer FOKUS Institute, Universita della Svizzera italiana, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, SURFnet, and the University of Wuerzburg. Designers and operators of modern data center networks want the ability to evolve the features they require in their networks to meet the needs of new cloud workloads and changing traffic patterns. The DXDD will feature extensive hands-on training that will enable participants to rapidly develop or add new networking features into production and ready-to-deploy COTS server networking hardware. The following industry-leading topics spanning multiple programming methods will be the focus of the training: SmartNIC dataplane programming using the P4 programming language; implementation of network functions such as time stamping, probing, and micro VNF using C; as well as implementation of seamless and hardware-agnostic dataplane acceleration using Open vSwitch (OVS) and Enhanced Berkeley Packet Filter (eBPF) technologies. “Many of the Open-NFP research and development projects are coming from within the European university and research community, and we are excited to expand our highly educational dataplane acceleration workshops into the region,” said Dr. Bapi Vinnakota, managing director of Open-NFP. “Developers wishing to discuss today’s dataplane acceleration challenges and further their own practical knowledge will appreciate the opportunity for detailed technical discussions and interaction with their peers. We look forward to continuing our collaboration with the academic, industry and research communities to further enhance their programming education and productivity.” “P4 is a vendor neutral domain specific language that offers many exciting new possibilities,” said Ronald van der Pol of SURFnet’s network department. “We investigate P4 applications that give more insight into what is happening inside the network, and also P4’s potential to facilitate the introduction of new protocols. We look forward to collaborating with Open-NFP to further dataplane acceleration programming education within the European research community.” “I head a young research group addressing topics related to data analytics, network and systems security working in tight collaboration with several industrial partners. Open-NFP is important for us because we have access to technologies, which are otherwise closed and accessible only through NDAs,” said Dr. Radu State, senior research scientist and head of SEDAN research group at the SnT research center of the University of Luxembourg. “Therefore, the Open-NFP constitutes a valuable asset to my team to get a deep technical understanding of cutting edge research and technologies in the field of computer networking. Furthermore, the platform allows us to develop new approaches for security monitoring, test and prototype them in realistic conditions. I am glad that Open-NFP is making an effort to bring closer and even more reachable all this content and expertise to us. I hope there will be many more chances like this for researchers and universities to come together and strengthen their knowledge.” Register today to ensure your seat at the conference. Members of the NREN community receive a 50 percent registration discount. The conference will be held at the SURFnet office at Hoog Overborch (Hoog Catharijne) in Utrecht, the Netherlands. Open-NFP.org is a worldwide, community-driven organization that enables open and collaborative research in the area of network function processing in server networking hardware. The organization is designed to serve the growing need from the academic and data center networking communities to conduct cutting-edge research and development in the areas of server-based networking datapath offload and acceleration techniques. The organization’s website is designed to be a common repository of open source networking datapath P4/C application code and research papers. For more information please visit www.open-nfp.org. All trademarks mentioned are registered trademarks or trademarks of their respective owners in the United States and other countries.


News Article | May 5, 2017
Site: www.24-7pressrelease.com

ROCHESTER, NY, May 05, 2017-- Camillo Peracchia is a celebrated Marquis Who's Who biographee. As in all Marquis Who's Who biographical volumes, individuals profiled are selected on the basis of current reference value. Factors such as position, noteworthy accomplishments, visibility, and prominence in a field are all taken into account during the selection process.Marquis Who's Who, the world's premier publisher of biographical profiles, is proud to name Dr. Peracchia a Lifetime Achiever. An accomplished listee, Dr. Peracchia celebrates many years' experience in his professional network, and has been noted for achievements, leadership qualities, and the credentials and successes he has accrued in his field.Dr. Peracchia serves as a professor emeritus of pharmacology and physiology with the University of Rochester Medical Center.In addition to his status as a Lifetime Achiever, Dr. Peracchia has earned a number of awards and accolades, including a Manuel D. Goldman Prize, an Adolph Medal for Excellence in Physiology from the University of Rochester Medical Center and five Teaching Commendation Awards. He has also earned grants from Rochester Eye and Human Parts, Inc., and the National Institutes of Health (Institute of General Medical Science). Furthermore, he has been featured in a number of Marquis Who's Who publications, including Who's Who in America, Who's Who in Medicine and Healthcare, Who's Who in Science and Engineering and Who's Who in the World.Dr. Peracchia is an elected member of the American Society for Cell Biology (1967-present) and the Biophysics Society (1980-present). He is an elected honorary member of the Societa di Medicina e Scienze Naturali di Parma, Universita di Parma, Italy (1994-present) and an elected member of the National Reviewers Reserve (NRR), NIH (June 1994-present). He was an elected member of the Cell Biology and Physiology Study Section (Subcommittee 1), NIH (October 1990-June 1994). He is the author of over 100 scientific papers, an invited speaker at over 40 International Congresses and invited speaker at over 100 seminars.For over five decades Dr. Peracchia's research has been focused on cell-to-cell communication via gap junction channels. In particular, Dr. Peracchia has studied the molecular mechanisms that regulate the chemical gating of gap junction channels. In the early 1980s Dr. Peracchia pioneered a theory that envisions a direct role of calmodulin (a calcium modulated protein) in the channel gating mechanism. Over the years this theory has been confirmed by numerous studies.Dr. Peracchia is the editor of three books:Peracchia, C. (Editor) 1991. Biophysics of Gap Junction Channels. CRC Press, Inc., Boca Raton, FLPeracchia, C. (Editor) 1994. "Handbook of Membrane Channels. Molecular and Cellular Physiology". Academic Press, Inc., San Diego, CAPeracchia, C. (Editor) 2000. "Gap Junctions - Molecular Basis of Cell Communication in Health and Disease". Academic Press, Inc., San Diego, CAHe is the author of the books:Peracchia, C. and Anaizi, N.H. "Lung Function in Health and Disease - Basic Concepts of Respiratory Physiology and Pathophysiology. Bentham Science Publishers, March 2014Peracchia, C. Gap Junction Structure and Chemical Regulation. Calmodulin Role in Cell-to-Cell Channel Gating. A personal journey. (book in preparation, projected date of publication: 2018).In recognition of outstanding contributions to his profession and the Marquis Who's Who community, Dr. Peracchia has been featured on the Marquis Who's Who Lifetime Achievers website. Please visit http://whoswholifetimeachievers.com/2017/03/13/camillo-peracchia/ to view this distinguished honor.About Marquis Who's Who :Since 1899, when A. N. Marquis printed the First Edition of Who's Who in America , Marquis Who's Who has chronicled the lives of the most accomplished individuals and innovators from every significant field of endeavor, including politics, business, medicine, law, education, art, religion and entertainment. Today, Who's Who in America remains an essential biographical source for thousands of researchers, journalists, librarians and executive search firms around the world. Marquis publications may be visited at the official Marquis Who's Who website at www.marquiswhoswho.com


News Article | May 5, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

SANTA CLARA, Californie--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Open-NFP, une organisation mondiale communautaire axée sur la recherche et le développement en matière de déchargements de chemins de données et d'accélération pour applications SDN et NFV, a annoncé aujourd'hui qu'elle hébergera le prochain évènement Dataplane Acceleration Developer Day (DXDD) Europe le 7 juin à Utrecht, aux Pays-Bas. Open-NFP constate une demande significative en termes de promotion de l'éducation en accélération de plan de données et de formation pratique pour la communauté commerciale et de la recherche en Europe pour promouvoir les solutions et les applications SDN et NFV haute performance de prochaine génération. DXDD Europe rassemblera des chercheurs, des développeurs, des étudiants et des affiliés de l'industrie pour une formation pratique répondant à une exigence critique du centre de données moderne : la capacité à changer le comportement du réseau du matériel de mise en réseau de serveur COTS à la vitesse à laquelle on peut changer le logiciel. Depuis sa création et la première conférence de développeurs annuelle en 2015, l'adhésion à Open-NFP a augmenté et compte actuellement plus de 35 projets de recherche et de développement ouverts du secteur universitaire et de l'industrie. Les bibliothèques de logiciel et de chemins de données échantillons sont toutes hébergées sur GitHub, ce qui permet un développement collaboratif entre des équipes distribuées. De nombreuses organisations et universités ont contribué en Europe, y compris Airbus, l'Université de Cambridge, Fraunhofer FOKUS Institute, Universita della Svizzera italiana, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, SURFnet, et l'Université de Wuerzburg. Les concepteurs et opérateurs de réseaux de centres de données modernes veulent être capables de développer les fonctionnalités qu'ils souhaitent dans leurs réseaux afin de répondre aux exigences des nouvelles charges de travail en nuage et à l'évolution des flux de trafic. Le DXDD offrira une formation pratique approfondie qui permettra aux participants de développer ou d'ajouter rapidement de nouvelles fonctionnalités de mise en réseau dans un matériel de mise en réseau de serveurs COTS de production facile à déployer. La formation portera sur des thèmes leaders du secteur couvrant de multiples méthodes de programmation : la programmation du plan de données SmartNIC utilisant le langage de programmation P4 ; l'implémentation de fonctions de réseau telles que l'horodatage, le sondage, et micro VNF utilisant C ; ainsi que l'implémentation d'une accélération du plan de données transparente et indépendante du logiciel utilisant les technologies Open vSwitch (OVS) et Enhanced Berkeley Packet Filter (eBPF). « De nombreux projets de recherche et développement Open-NFP proviennent de la communauté universitaire et de la recherche européenne, et nous sommes ravis d'offrir nos ateliers d'accélération du plan de données hautement instructifs dans la région », a déclaré Dr Bapi Vinnakota, directeur général d'Open-NFP. « Les développeurs qui souhaitent aborder les défis actuels que présente l'accélération du plan de données et améliorer leurs propres connaissances pratiques apprécieront l'occasion de participer à des discussions techniques détaillées et d'interagir avec leurs homologues. Nous nous réjouissons à l'idée de poursuivre notre collaboration avec les communautés universitaires, industrielles et de la recherche afin d'améliorer leurs connaissances et leur productivité en matière de programmation. » « Je dirige un jeune groupe de recherche qui aborde des thèmes concernant l'analyse des données et la sécurité des systèmes et des réseaux en étroite collaboration avec plusieurs partenaires de l'industrie. L'organisation Open-NFP est importante pour nous car nous avons accès à des technologies qui sont autrement fermées et uniquement accessibles via des NDA », a ajouté Dr Radu State, chercheur scientifique principal et responsable du groupe de recherche SEDAN au centre de recherche SnT de l'Université du Luxembourg. « L'Open-NFP est donc un actif de valeur permettant à mon équipe d'acquérir des connaissances techniques approfondies de la recherche et des technologies dans le domaine de la mise en réseau informatique. Qui plus est, la plateforme nous permet de développer de nouvelles approches pour la surveillance de la sécurité, de les tester et de les prototyper dans des conditions réalistes. Je suis heureux que l'Open-NFP s'efforce de rendre tout ce contenu et toute cette expertise plus proches et encore plus atteignables pour nous. J'espère que les chercheurs et les universités auront encore plus d'occasions telles que celle-ci de se rassembler et de consolider leurs connaissances. » Open-NFP.org est une organisation communautaire mondiale permettant une recherche ouverte et collaborative dans le domaine du traitement de la fonction réseau dans le matériel de mise en réseau de serveurs. L'organisation a pour but de répondre au besoin croissant des communautés de mise en réseau de centre de données et universitaires de mener une recherche et un développement de pointe dans les domaines des techniques d'accélération et de déchargement de chemins de données de mise en réseau basée serveur. Le site Web de l'organisation est conçu pour être un référentiel commun de code d'application P4/C de chemins de données de mise en réseau open source et de documents de recherche. Pour en savoir plus, veuillez consulter www.open-nfp.org.


News Article | March 4, 2016
Site: www.spie.org

For the first time, scientists have observed gravitational waves, ripples in the fabric of spacetime arriving at Earth from a cataclysmic event in the distant universe. This confirms a major prediction of Albert Einstein's 1915 general theory of relativity and opens an unprecedented new window to the cosmos. The discovery was announced on 11 February at a press conference in Washington, DC, hosted by the National Science Foundation, the primary funder of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO). The gravitational waves were produced during the final fraction of a second of the merger of two black holes to produce a single, more massive spinning black hole. This collision of two black holes had been predicted but never observed. The event took place on 14 September 2015 at 5:51 a.m. EDT (09:51 UTC) by both of the twin (LIGO) detectors, located in Livingston, Louisiana, and Hanford, Washington. The LIGO observatories are funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), and were conceived, built and are operated by the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). SPIE video and related article: LIGO Hanford scientists celebrate while looking ahead to future discoveries This discovery comes at the culmination of decades of instrument research and development, through a world-wide effort of thousands of researchers, and made possible by dedicated support for LIGO from the NSF. It marks the beginning of a new era of gravitational-wave astronomy - the possibilities for discovery are as rich and boundless as they have been with light-based astronomy. Gravitational waves carry information about their dramatic origins and about the nature of gravity that cannot otherwise be obtained. Based on the observed signals, LIGO scientists estimate that the black holes for this event were about 29 and 36 times the mass of the sun, and the event took place 1.3 billion years ago. About 3 times the mass of the sun was converted into gravitational waves in a fraction of a second-with a peak power output about 50 times that of the whole visible universe. By looking at the time of arrival of the signals-the detector in Livingston recorded the event 7 milliseconds before the detector in Hanford-scientists can say that the source was located in the Southern Hemisphere, in the approximate direction of the Magellanic Clouds. How our sun and Earth warp space and time, or spacetime, is represented here with a green grid. As Albert Einstein demonstrated in his theory of general relativity, the gravity of massive bodies warps the fabric of space and time-and those bodies move along paths determined by this geometry. His theory also predicted the existence of gravitational waves, which are ripples in space and time. These waves, which move at the speed of light, are created when massive bodies accelerate through space and time. (LIGO) According to general relativity, a pair of black holes orbiting around each other lose energy through the emission of gravitational waves, causing them to gradually approach each other over billions of years, and then much more quickly in the final minutes. During the final fraction of a second, the two black holes collide into each other at nearly one-half the speed of light and form a single more massive black hole, converting a portion of the combined black holes' mass to energy, according to Einstein's formula E=mc2. This energy is emitted as a final strong burst of gravitational waves. It is these gravitational waves that LIGO has observed. "Our observation of gravitational waves accomplishes an ambitious goal set out over 5 decades ago to directly detect this elusive phenomenon and better understand the universe, and, fittingly, fulfills Einstein's legacy on the 100th anniversary of his general theory of relativity," says Caltech's David H. Reitze, executive director of the LIGO Laboratory. The discovery, accepted for publication in the journal Physical Review Letters, was made by the LIGO Scientific Collaboration (which includes the GEO Collaboration and the Australian Consortium for Interferometric Gravitational Astronomy) and the Virgo Collaboration using data from the two LIGO detectors. The discovery was made possible by the enhanced capabilities of Advanced LIGO, a major upgrade that increases the sensitivity of the instruments compared to the first generation LIGO detectors, enabling a large increase in the volume of the universe probed-and the discovery of gravitational waves during its first observation run. The US National Science Foundation leads in financial support for Advanced LIGO. Funding organizations in Germany (Max Planck Society), the U.K. (Science and Technology Facilities Council, STFC) and Australia (Australian Research Council) also have made significant commitments to the project. Several of the key technologies that made Advanced LIGO so much more sensitive have been developed and tested by the German UK GEO collaboration. Significant computer resources have been contributed by the AEI Hannover Atlas Cluster, the LIGO Laboratory, Syracuse University, and the University of Wisconsin- Milwaukee. Several universities designed, built, and tested key components for Advanced LIGO: The Australian National University, the University of Adelaide, the University of Florida, Stanford University, Columbia University of the City of New York, and Louisiana State University. "In 1992, when LIGO's initial funding was approved, it represented the biggest investment the NSF had ever made," says France Córdova, NSF director. "It was a big risk. But the National Science Foundation is the agency that takes these kinds of risks. We support fundamental science and engineering at a point in the road to discovery where that path is anything but clear. We fund trailblazers. It's why the U.S. continues to be a global leader in advancing knowledge." LIGO research is carried out by the LIGO Scientific Collaboration (LSC), a group of more than 1000 scientists from universities around the United States and in 14 other countries. More than 90 universities and research institutes in the LSC develop detector technology and analyze data; approximately 250 students are strong contributing members of the collaboration. The LSC detector network includes the LIGO interferometers and the GEO600 detector. The GEO team includes scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics (Albert Einstein Institute, AEI), Leibniz Universität Hannover, along with partners at the University of Glasgow, Cardiff University, the University of Birmingham, other universities in the United Kingdom, and the University of the Balearic Islands in Spain. LIGO was originally proposed as a means of detecting these gravitational waves in the 1980s by Rainer Weiss, professor of physics, emeritus, from MIT; Kip Thorne, Caltech's Richard P. Feynman Professor of Theoretical Physics, emeritus; and Ronald Drever, professor of physics, emeritus, also from Caltech. "The description of this observation is beautifully described in the Einstein theory of general relativity formulated 100 years ago and comprises the first test of the theory in strong gravitation. It would have been wonderful to watch Einstein's face had we been able to tell him," says Weiss. "With this discovery, we humans are embarking on a marvelous new quest: the quest to explore the warped side of the universe-objects and phenomena that are made from warped spacetime. Colliding black holes and gravitational waves are our first beautiful examples," says Thorne. In a 1987 interview with SPIE, Thorne talked about his vision for the LIGO detectors. "The kinds of things one will see with gravitational waves will be very different from what one sees with electromagnetic waves," Thorne said. "The region from which the gravitational waves would come would be the region of very strong gravity, deep in the interior of the imploding star...Gravitational waves are the only things that can get out unimpeded, with no loss of information." The SPIE video below is from a visit in September 2015 to the Hanford LIGO observatory. The first gravitational wave had been detected a week earlier, but was not announced until February 2016.


News Article | November 28, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

ROME, Nov. 28, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The Electronic Components and Systems for European Leadership (ECSEL) Joint Undertaking announced the Lab4MEMS project as the winner of its 2016 Innovation Award during the European Nanoelectronics Forum, in Rome, Italy. At its launch in January 2014, Lab4MEMS was identified as a Key Enabling Technology Pilot-Line project for next-generation Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) devices augmented with advanced technologies such as piezoelectric or magnetic materials and 3D packaging to enhance the next generation of smart sensors, actuators, micro-pumps, and energy harvesters. These technologies were recognized as important contributors to future data-storage, printing, healthcare, automotive, industrial-control, and smart-building applications, as well as consumer applications such as smartphones and navigation devices. In accepting the award, Roberto Zafalon, General Project Coordinator of Lab4MEMS and the European Programs Manager in R&D and Public Affairs for STMicroelectronics Italy said, "The ECSEL Innovation Award highlights the excellent results the Lab4MEMS team achieved through the project's execution and the high impact of its successes. In particular, Lab4MEMS developed innovative MEMS solutions with advanced piezoelectric and magnetic materials, including advanced 3D Packaging technologies." In coordinating the €28m[1], 36-month Lab4MEMS project, ST led the team of twenty partners, which included universities, research institutions, and technology businesses across ten European countries. ST's MEMS facilities in Italy and Malta contributed their complete set of manufacturing competencies for next-generation devices, spanning design and fabrication to test and packaging to the project. All of these successes contributed to the Lab4MEMS project and are available to benefit the contributors. These participants were Politecnico di Torino (Italy); Fondazione Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (Italy); Politecnico di Milano (Italy); Consorzio Nazionale Interuniversitario per la Nanoelettronica (Italy); Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique et aux énergies alternatives (France); SERMA Technologies SA (France); STMicroelectronics Ltd. (Malta); Universita ta Malta (Malta); Solmates BV (Netherlands); Cavendish Kinetics BV (Netherlands); Okmetic OYJ (Finland); VTT (Finland); Picosun OY (Finland); KLA-Tencor ICOS (Belgium); Universitatea Politehnica din Bucuresti (Romania); Instytut Technologii Elektronowej (Poland); Stiftelsen SINTEF (Norway); Sonitor Technologies AS (Norway); BESI GmbH (Austria). [1] The total cost of the project - € 28.2 million - was supported in part by funding from the ECSEL Joint Undertaking and by contributions from each of the respective National agencies: Italy, France, Malta, The Netherlands, Finland, Belgium, Poland, Norway, Austria, Romania. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/58bc7ac2-94f2-4219-b124-e313a3235239


ROME, 01-Dec-2016 — /EuropaWire/ — The Electronic Components and Systems for European Leadership (ECSEL) Joint Undertaking announced the Lab4MEMS project as the winner of its 2016 Innovation Award during the European Nanoelectronics Forum, in Rome, Italy. At its launch in January 2014, Lab4MEMS was identified as a Key Enabling Technology Pilot-Line project for next-generation Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) devices augmented with advanced technologies such as piezoelectric or magnetic materials and 3D packaging to enhance the next generation of smart sensors, actuators, micro-pumps, and energy harvesters. These technologies were recognized as important contributors to future data-storage, printing, healthcare, automotive, industrial-control, and smart-building applications, as well as consumer applications such as smartphones and navigation devices. In accepting the award, Roberto Zafalon, General Project Coordinator of Lab4MEMS and the European Programs Manager in R&D and Public Affairs for STMicroelectronics Italy said, “The ECSEL Innovation Award highlights the excellent results the Lab4MEMS team achieved through the project’s execution and the high impact of its successes. In particular, Lab4MEMS developed innovative MEMS solutions with advanced piezoelectric and magnetic materials, including advanced 3D Packaging technologies. In coordinating the €28m[1], 36-month Lab4MEMS project, ST led the team of twenty partners, which included universities, research institutions, and technology businesses across ten European countries. ST’s MEMS facilities in Italy and Malta contributed their complete set of manufacturing competencies for next-generation devices, spanning design and fabrication to test and packaging to the project. In accepting the award, Roberto Zafalon, General Project Coordinator of Lab4MEMS and the European Programs Manager in R&D and Public Affairs for STMicroelectronics Italy said, “The ECSEL Innovation Award highlights the excellent results the Lab4MEMS team achieved through the project’s execution and the high impact of its successes. In particular, Lab4MEMS developed innovative MEMS solutions with advanced piezoelectric and magnetic materials, including advanced 3D Packaging technologies.” In coordinating the €28m[1], 36-month Lab4MEMS project, ST led the team of twenty partners, which included universities, research institutions, and technology businesses across ten European countries. ST’s MEMS facilities in Italy and Malta contributed their complete set of manufacturing competencies for next-generation devices, spanning design and fabrication to test and packaging to the project. All of these successes contributed to the Lab4MEMS project and are available to benefit the contributors. These participants were Politecnico di Torino (Italy); Fondazione Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (Italy); Politecnico di Milano (Italy); Consorzio Nazionale Interuniversitario per la Nanoelettronica (Italy); Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux énergies alternatives (France); SERMA Technologies SA (France); STMicroelectronics Ltd. (Malta); Universita ta Malta (Malta); Solmates BV (Netherlands); Cavendish Kinetics BV (Netherlands); Okmetic OYJ (Finland); VTT (Finland); Picosun OY (Finland); KLA-Tencor ICOS (Belgium); Universitatea Politehnica din Bucuresti (Romania); Instytut Technologii Elektronowej (Poland); Stiftelsen SINTEF (Norway); Sonitor Technologies AS (Norway); BESI GmbH (Austria). [1] The total cost of the project – € 28.2 million – was supported in part by funding from the ECSEL Joint Undertaking and by contributions from each of the respective National agencies: Italy, France, Malta, The Netherlands, Finland, Belgium, Poland, Norway, Austria, Romania.


News Article | November 17, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

AUSTIN, Texas, Nov. 17, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- XBiotech Inc. (NASDAQ:XBIT), developer of True Human™ therapeutic antibodies, announced today commencement of a collaboration with a research team at Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) School of Medicine headed by leading gastroenterologist, Fabio Cominelli, M.D., Ph.D. Dr. Cominelli and his research team will conduct pre-clinical studies to help develop new treatments for Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) using the company’s pioneering approach to using natural human antibody therapy to neutralize harmful inflammation. Dr. Cominelli is a world-leading expert in inflammatory bowel disease. His group was the first to report that specific blockade of interleukin-1 (IL-1) was effective in reducing disease severity in colitis and that deregulated inflammation is a cause of auto-inflammatory diseases, including IBD. Dr. Cominelli is Chief of the Division of Gastroenterology and Liver Disease and Director of the Digestive Health Institute at CWRU School of Medicine in Cleveland and Chief Scientific Officer of the Digestive Health Institute at University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center. Dr. Cominelli is also the Hermann Menges Jr. Chair in Internal Medicine and Professor at CWRU School of Medicine. Dr. Cominelli has a professional interest in Crohn's disease, gastrointestinal (GI) cancer, IBD and ulcerative colitis. He is a member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation and Association of American Physicians. He has previously earned a NIH Merit Award. His work has been published in a number of peer-reviewed journals, such as Inflammatory Bowel Diseases and The Journal of Immunology. Dr. Cominelli earned his medical degree at Universita’ Degli Studi di Firenze in Florence, Italy, where he also completed his internal medicine residency. He completed his gastroenterology fellowship at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center in Torrance, California. Dr. Cominelli stated, “I have researched IL-1’s role in disease severity in colitis for many years, and am excited about the opportunity to be able to selectively inhibit IL-1 alpha to better define its role in IBD. These results will help shape the design of future clinical trials as we look for new and better treatments for this wide-spread condition.” John Simard, the Company’s President and Chief Executive Officer, commented, “Dr. Cominelli’s past research has formed the foundation for clinical trials with important implications for new treatments for patients suffering from inflammatory diseases of the bowl. We are hopeful that this collaboration will provide for further advances in treatment.” About Inflammatory Bowel Disease Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a common condition involving chronic inflammation of the digestive tract. IBD primarily includes ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, both of which are typically associated with severe diarrhea, pain, fatigue and weight loss. IBD can have a devastating impact on quality of life and in some cases lead to life-threatening complications. There are approximately 1.6 million Americans and 5 million people worldwide suffering from IBD with as many as 70,000 new cases diagnosed yearly in the U.S1. About True Human™ Therapeutic Antibodies Unlike previous generations of antibody therapies, XBiotech’s True Human™ antibodies are derived without modification from individuals who possess natural immunity to certain diseases. With discovery and clinical programs across multiple disease areas, XBiotech’s True Human antibodies have the potential to harness the body’s natural immunity to fight disease with increased safety, efficacy and tolerability. About XBiotech XBiotech is a fully integrated global biosciences company dedicated to pioneering the discovery, development and commercialization of therapeutic antibodies based on its True Human™ proprietary technology. XBiotech currently is advancing a robust pipeline of antibody therapies to redefine the standards of care in oncology, inflammatory conditions and infectious diseases. Headquartered in Austin, Texas, XBiotech also is leading the development of innovative biotech manufacturing technologies designed to more rapidly, cost-effectively and flexibly produce new therapies urgently needed by patients worldwide. For more information, visit www.xbiotech.com. Cautionary Note on Forward-Looking Statements This press release contains forward-looking statements, including declarations regarding management's beliefs and expectations that involve substantial risks and uncertainties. In some cases, you can identify forward-looking statements by terminology such as "may," "will," "should," "would," "could," "expects," "plans," "contemplate," "anticipates," "believes," "estimates," "predicts," "projects," "intend" or "continue" or the negative of such terms or other comparable terminology, although not all forward-looking statements contain these identifying words. Forward-looking statements are subject to inherent risks and uncertainties in predicting future results and conditions that could cause the actual results to differ materially from those projected in these forward-looking statements. These risks and uncertainties are subject to the disclosures set forth in the "Risk Factors" section of certain of our SEC filings. Forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance, and our actual results of operations, financial condition and liquidity, and the development of the industry in which we operate, may differ materially from the forward-looking statements contained in this press release. Any forward-looking statements that we make in this press release speak only as of the date of this press release. We assume no obligation to update our forward-looking statements whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, after the date of this press release.


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

BOSTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--GE (NYSE:GE) announced today the appointment of seven new company officers. Adrian Button has been promoted in his current role to Vice President of Supply Chain for Industrial Solutions, GE Energy Connections. Adrian joined GE in 1998 as a Quality Engineer and has held several operations leadership positions with GE Aviation, Unison Industries and GE Oil & Gas. Prior to joining GE Energy Connections, Adrian served as General Manager of Turbo Machinery Solutions for GE Oil & Gas covering the Middle East and North Africa region and General Manager of the Global Operations team. Adrian earned his bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Glamorgan in the United Kingdom. Buckmaster “Buck” de Wolf has been promoted to Chief Intellectual Property Counsel for GE and General Counsel for GE Global Research. Buck has been at GE for more than eleven years in senior legal roles at GE Corporate and GE Global Research. Prior to joining GE, Buck was a Partner at Howrey in San Francisco, CA. He earned his bachelor’s degree in economics from Middlebury College and his juris doctorate from Boston College. Danny Di Perna has been appointed Vice President, Global Sourcing for GE Power. Prior to joining GE, Danny was Pratt & Whitney’s Senior Vice President of Operations, responsible for new product development, sourcing, manufacturing, supply chain, supplier quality and production engine assembly. Danny has more than 27 years of experience within the aerospace industry, including 24 years with United Technologies Corporation. He earned his bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from Concordia University and his master’s in business administration from McGill University. Amit Phadnis has been appointed Vice President, Chief Technology Officer- Imaging, GE Healthcare. In this role, Amit will drive digitization, software and cross modality initiatives across the Imaging business. Amit joins GE from Cisco Systems where, most recently, he was the India Site Leader and Senior Vice President of Engineering for the Core Software Group. Prior to working at Cisco Systems, Amit held leadership roles at Motorola, Tata Elxsi and Silcom Automation Systems. Amit earned his master’s degree in electronics & communication from the Indian Institute of Science. Pascal Schweitzer has been appointed Vice President, Global Services at GE Transportation. Pascal joined GE in 2015 after GE’s acquisition of Alstom’s power and grid businesses, and was appointed General Manager for GE Power Services in Europe. Prior to joining GE, Pascal spent eight years at Alstom where he held several leadership positions, leading Gas Turbine global services in his most recent role. Pascal earned his master’s degree in finance from HEC Paris. Maria Sferruzza has been promoted to Vice President, Global Services for Turbomachinery Solutions at GE Oil & Gas. With more than twenty years of experience at GE Oil & Gas, Maria has held a variety of leadership roles in operations, sales, marketing, and services. Maria earned her master’s degree in industrial engineering from the Universita’ di Palermo, Italy. Anup Sharma has been promoted to Vice President, Chief Information Officer and Chief Application Architect at GE Digital. With twenty years of experience at GE, Anup has held Chief Information Officer roles at GE Power and GE Oil & Gas before his current position at GE Digital. Anup earned his bachelor’s degree in management information systems and business management from Huntington University in Indiana. GE (NYSE:GE) is the world’s Digital Industrial Company, transforming industry with software-defined machines and solutions that are connected, responsive and predictive. GE is organized around a global exchange of knowledge, the "GE Store," through which each business shares and accesses the same technology, markets, structure and intellect. Each invention further fuels innovation and application across our industrial sectors. With people, services, technology and scale, GE delivers better outcomes for customers by speaking the language of industry. www.ge.com


News Article | October 31, 2016
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

In the age of fast-paced global communication, it's no wonder that teasing apart the anatomy of the new mineral merelaniite took a team from around the world. Most mineral discoveries start with boots on the ground -- or, rather, below the ground. The Merelani mining district is a well-known locale. Not only for prized tanzanite and tsavorite used in jewelry, but also for hosting a suite of other minerals increasingly prized by mineral collectors. "The Merelani district has been famous since the late 1960s for the blue gem variety of zoisite known as tanzanite, but this is really a mineral collector's paradise and an exciting place to look for new minerals," says John Jaszczak, a physics professor at Michigan Tech and the lead author on a new study published in Minerals that describes the new mineral. "The importance of the area is the reason we wanted to give tribute to the miners and name merelaniite for the district." There are 5,179 minerals listed by the International Mineralogical Association and their Commission on New Minerals, Nomenclature and Classification (CNMNC) receive more than 80 proposals each year for new ones. Many turn out to be variations of existing minerals. To discern the new from the variable, Jaszzak and his team put the tiny merelaniite whiskers through a battery of rigorous tests, particularly to discern its chemistry and crystal structure. "It is one thing to find a mineral that is probably new, it is quite another thing to be able to perform all of the required analyses to satisfy the CNMNC for approval of its status and a new name," Jaszczak says. Jaszczak teamed up with Mike Rumsey and John Spratt at the Natural History Museum in London to determine the chemical composition of the new mineral with precision. To help with understanding the crystal structure, Steve Hackney, professor of materials science at Michigan Tech, was able to provide crucial high-resolution images and diffraction patterns using transmission electron microscopy on ultrathin samples prepared with a diamond knife by Owen Mills, director of Michigan Tech's Applied Chemical & Morphological Analysis Laboratory. The growing team then sought out the help of Luca Bindi, a professor at the Università di Firenze in Italy and an expert in solving complicated crystals structures. He helped run x-ray diffraction studies to put all of the pieces together. The results revealed a complex structure made up of layers of molybdenum disulfide alternating at the atomic scale with layers of lead sulfide, along with other elements, including vanadium, antimony, bismuth, and selenium. The layers curve inward, growing into a scroll-like cylinder. Although it is not a showcase gem, merelaniite is attractive, and as the analyses show, it has an intricate, microscopic internal beauty as well. A better understanding of the crystal chemistry of these exotic materials may eventually find useful applications. Echoing physicist Richard Feynman, Jaszczak notes, "Science is about taking pleasure in finding things out and we're delighted to have uncovered and described this beautiful new mineral."


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

SALT LAKE CITY, UT (Oct., 2016) - The reproductive behaviors of birds are some of their most conspicuous and endearing qualities. From the colorful mating display of some birds, like peacocks, to the building of nests by nearly all birds, these are the characters we use to define birds and make them popular study subjects. One peculiar aspect of some birds is communal nesting, where multiple breeding pairs lay eggs in the same nest. This most famously occurs in ostriches, who can have several females lay their eggs in one nest that is tended by one dominant female. The reasons why this behavior may have evolved are unclear, especially when it's known that the females who share a nest are often unrelated. Knowing when this behavior evolved may help elucidate its evolutionary history. Now, thanks to research by Tzu-Ruei Yang and his colleagues, we know this behavior may have its origins back in the ancestors of birds, dinosaurs. Dr. Yang, of the Universita?t Bonn in Germany, and his colleagues, Jasmina Wiemann and Beate Spiering also of Universita?t Bonn, Anneke Van Heteren of the Zoologische Staatssammlung Mu?nchen in Germany, and Chun-Jung Chen of the National Museum of Natural Sciences in Taiwan, used the chemical composition of the fossil eggs shells in one nest to determine if they were laid by different mothers. This had been proposed before, but wasn't backed by multiple lines of evidence. "Dinosaur behaviors that are unlikely to be preserved in fossilization could be elucidated by chemical analysis more unambiguously", said Yang. The team used a peculiarity of egg laying physiology: birds of different ages lay eggs with different phosphorous content in their shells. Also, different birds lay eggs of different shapes. It turns out that the same was true for dinosaurs. So by examining the eggs from one nest, they could determine if they were laid by different mothers, and they were. The nests that were examined were of oviraptorid dinosaurs, two-legged carnivorous dinosaurs (theropods) closely related to the group that evolved into modern birds. Said Dr. van Heteren, "This research shows how important interdisciplinary collaborations are to unveal the truth about the past." About the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology Founded in 1940 by thirty-four paleontologists, the Society now has more than 2,300 members representing professionals, students, artists, preparators, and others interested in VP. It is organized exclusively for educational and scientific purposes, with the object of advancing the science of vertebrate paleontology. The Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology (JVP) is the leading journal of professional vertebrate paleontology and the flagship publication of the Society. It was founded in 1980 by Dr. Jiri Zidek and publishes contributions on all aspects of vertebrate paleontology.

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