Universal Technologies Corporation

Beavercreek, OH, United States

Universal Technologies Corporation

Beavercreek, OH, United States
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Magar K.T.,University of Dayton | Reich G.W.,Air Force Research Lab | Kondash C.,Universal Technologies Corporation | Slinker K.,Universal Technologies Corporation | And 3 more authors.
Bioinspiration and Biomimetics | Year: 2016

Distributed arrays of artificial hair sensors have bio-like sensing capabilities to obtain spatial and temporal surface flow information which is an important aspect of an effective fly-by-feel system. The spatiotemporal surface flow measurement enables further exploration of additional flow features such as flow stagnation, separation, and reattachment points. Due to their inherent robustness and fault tolerant capability, distributed arrays of hair sensors are well equipped to assess the aerodynamic and flow states in adverse conditions. In this paper, a local flow measurement from an array of artificial hair sensors in a wind tunnel experiment is used with a feedforward artificial neural network to predict aerodynamic parameters such as lift coefficient, moment coefficient, free-stream velocity, and angle of attack on an airfoil. We find the prediction error within 6% and 10% for lift and moment coefficients. The error for free-stream velocity and angle of attack were within 0.12 mph and 0.37 degrees. Knowledge of these parameters are key to finding the real time forces and moments which paves the way for effective control design to increase flight agility, stability, and maneuverability. © 2016 IOP Publishing Ltd.


Szmulowicz F.,Air Force Research Lab | Szmulowicz F.,U Dayton Res Institute | Haugan H.J.,Universal Technologies Corporation | Brown G.J.,Air Force Research Lab
Infrared Physics and Technology | Year: 2013

In order to limit cooling requirements, it is important to operate superlattice devices such as infrared detectors at the highest possible temperatures consistent with maintaining satisfactory figures of merit regarding signal and noise. One of the characteristics governing the device performance is vertical carrier mobility, although only horizontal mobilities are routinely measured. Recently, we calculated low-temperature vertical and horizontal mobilities, as limited by interface roughness scattering, for type-II InAs/GaSb superlattices as a function of SL dimensions and the degree of roughness. We found that the horizontal mobility was a double-valued function of the roughness correlation length, Λ. Here, we show that the indeterminacy of Λ can be overcome by comparing the temperature dependence of the calculated and measured mobilities; hence, we extend the calculation to higher temperatures. While the scattering mechanism itself is temperature independent, the band structure and the carrier distribution are temperature-dependent. As a function of temperature, we find that as a function of the correlation length, mobilities can increase, decrease, or remain constant. This behavior is explained on the basis of the physics of the problem. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Szmulowicz F.,Air Force Research Lab | Szmulowicz F.,U Dayton Res Institute | Haugan H.J.,Universal Technologies Corporation | Elhamri S.,U. Dayton | Brown G.J.,Air Force Research Lab
Infrared Physics and Technology | Year: 2013

In order to limit cooling requirements, it is important to operate superlattice devices such as infrared detectors at the highest possible temperatures consistent with maintaining satisfactory figures of merit regarding signal and noise. One of the characteristics governing the device performance is vertical carrier mobility, although only horizontal mobilities are routinely measured. Recently, we calculated low-temperature vertical and horizontal mobilities, as limited by interface roughness scattering, for type-II InAs/GaSb superlattices as a function of SL dimensions and the degree of roughness. We found that the horizontal mobility was a double-valued function of the roughness correlation length, Λ. Here, we show that the indeterminacy of Λ can be overcome by comparing the temperature dependence of the calculated and measured mobilities; hence, we extend the calculation to higher temperatures. While the scattering mechanism itself is temperature independent, the band structure and the carrier distribution are temperature-dependent. As a function of temperature, we find that as a function of the correlation length, mobilities can increase, decrease, or remain constant. This behavior is explained on the basis of the physics of the problem. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Williams T.,Tuskegee University | Hosur M.,Tuskegee University | Theodore M.,Universal Technologies Corporation | Theodore M.,Air Force Research Lab | And 3 more authors.
International Journal of Polymer Science | Year: 2011

Properties of cellulose-derived fibers are extremely sensitive to surface treatment. Many studies have investigated the effects of varying surface treatment parameters in natural fibers to improve fiber-matrix bonding; however, work is still needed to assist with developing better quality control methods to use these fibers in more load-bearing composites. Kenaf fibers were alkali treated, and the surface and morphology were analyzed to determine how treatment time affected the bonding sites in natural fibers. The mechanical behavior was also characterized, and tensile testing reported a 61% increase in strength and a 25% increase inmodulus in fibers treated for 16 hours. The increase in tensile properties was assumed to result from increased intermolecular interaction and increased crystallinity in cellulose, which was supported by XRD. On the other hand, FTIR spectroscopy and XPS showed that the amount of hydroxyl groups needed for fiber-matrix bonding decreased at longer treatment times. Copyright © 2011 T.Williams et al.


Jones A.,University of Maryland University College | Hodara J.,Georgia Institute of Technology | Smith M.,Georgia Institute of Technology | Granlund K.,Universal Technologies Corporation | And 2 more authors.
Annual Forum Proceedings - AHS International | Year: 2015

A low-Reynolds number rectilinear analog of the retreating-blade problem is considered by computationally and experimentally studying a NACA0012 blade in spanwise oscilla-tion in a free stream. Three-dimensional hybrid RANS-LES simulations with spanwise periodic boundary conditions and experimental flow visualization support the description of experimental direct force measurements for a wide range reduced frequencies and advance ratios, including fully reversed flow conditions. A fixed incidence of 6 degrees is taken as a nominally attached-flow case, and agrees reasonably well with Isaacs' theory. A fixed incidence of 20 degrees is taken as a fully-separated case, and departs markedly from invis-cid theory, and even more so from quasi-steady approximation. Experimental-computational comparison shows a computational overprediction of lift relative to experimental results, at moderate advance ratios. Agreement in fully reversed flow is, however, quite good.


Criner A.K.,University of Dayton | Cherry A.J.,Southwestern Ohio Council for Higher Education | Cooney A.T.,Air Force Research Lab | Katter T.D.,Universal Technologies Corporation
AIP Conference Proceedings | Year: 2014

A semi-classical model of the reflectance of a complex material is modeled. Model selection techniques using this reflectance model are developed to detect molecular vibration modes measured using infrared spectroscopy. An inverse problem methodology is then used to ascertain the underlying vibrational modes associated with varying concentrations of different chemical species. These two techniques are developed to characterize the extent of material degradation through the detection of spectra associated with the chemical processes underlying the degradation process. These methods are validated using data from samples of ceramic matrix composites. The samples considered were exposed to varying amounts of thermal treatment to ascertain the effectiveness of these methods to detect degradation. © 2014 AIP Publishing LLC.


Borton P.T.,Air Force Research Lab | Borton P.T.,University of Dayton | Check M.H.,Air Force Research Lab | Check M.H.,Universal Technologies Corporation | And 3 more authors.
ECS Transactions | Year: 2013

A wide variety of fullerene based materials has shown great promise for energy conversion applications such as thermoelectric and photovoltaic devices. With their intrinsically low thermal conductivities, fullerene based materials may offer several advantages for thermoelectric applications over traditional inorganic based thermoelectric materials. Fulleride materials have already shown electrical properties spanning from the insulative to superconductive regimes. In order to rapidly advance the development of new transition metal fullerides, a thin film approach, novel wet chemical method, and chemical vapor deposition method were explored. Materials formed from these synthesis routes have been found to retain their low thermal conductivities. A present focus is on Raman spectral analysis for preliminary determination of the materials' stoichiometries. © The Electrochemical Society.


Szmulowicz F.,University of Dayton | Haugan H.J.,Universal Technologies Corporation | Elhamri S.,University of Dayton | Brown G.J.,Air Force Research Lab
Physical Review B - Condensed Matter and Materials Physics | Year: 2011

Superlattice (SL) devices such as infrared detectors and quantum-cascade lasers rely on efficient transport of carriers perpendicular to the SL layers by drift and/or diffusion. While horizontal mobilities are measured routinely, measurements of perpendicular-carrier mobilities require nonstandard experimental techniques such as the geometric magneto-resistance. Here we show how perpendicular mobilities can be estimated from horizontal mobility measurements and calculated mobilities. We treat low-temperature horizontal and vertical transport in SL on an equal footing by calculating both mobilities using the same interface roughness scattering (IRS) model from a rigorous solution of the Boltzmann transport equation. The calculation is specialized to the case of InAs/GaSb SLs, which are of current interest in the development of third-generation infrared detector focal plane arrays. The results are compared to available data. © 2011 American Physical Society.

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