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Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: NERC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 1.21M | Year: 2013

This project aims to better understand the links between ecosystem services (ES) and wellbeing in order to design and implement more effective interventions for poverty alleviation. We do this in the context of coastal, social-ecological systems in two poor African countries; Kenya and Mozambique. Despite recent policy and scientific interest in ES, there remain important knowledge gaps regarding how ecosystems actually contribute to wellbeing, and thus poverty alleviation. Following the ESPA framework, distinguishing ecological processes, final ES, capital inputs, goods and values, this project is concerned with how these elements are interrelated to produce ES benefits, and focuses specifically on how these benefits are distributed to (potentially) benefit the poor, enhancing their wellbeing. We thus address the ESPA goal of understanding and promoting ways in which benefits to the poorest can be increased and more people can meet their basic needs, but we also identify conflicted tradeoffs, i.e. those which result in serious harm to either the ecosystem or poor people and which need urgent attention. Several fundamental questions are currently debated in international scientific and policy fora, relating to four major global trends which are likely to affect abilities of poor people to access ES benefits: (1) devolution of governance power and its impacts on local governance of ecosystems and production of ES, (2) unprecedented rates and scales of environmental change, particularly climate change, which are creating new vulnerabilities, opportunities and constraints, shifting baselines, and demanding radical changes in behaviour to cope, (3) market integration now reaches the most remote corners of the developing world, changing relationships between people and resources and motivations for natural resource management, (4) societal changes, including demographic, population, urbanisation and globalisation of culture, forge new relationships with ES and further decouple people from direct dependency on particular resources. Study sites have been chosen so as to gather empirical evidence to help answer key questions about how these four drivers of change affect abilities of poor people to benefit from ES. We aim for direct impact on the wellbeing of poor inhabitants of the rapidly transforming coastal areas in Mozambique and Kenya, where research will take place, while also providing indirect impact to coastal poor in other developing countries through our international impact strategy. Benefits from research findings will also accrue to multiple stakeholders at various levels. Local government, NGOs and civil society groups - through engagement with project activities, e.g. participation in workshops and exposure to new types of analysis and systems thinking. Donor organizations and development agencies - through research providing evidence to inform strategies to support sector development (e.g. fisheries, coastal planning and tourism development) and methods to understand and evaluate impacts of different development interventions - e.g. through tradeoff analysis and evaluation of the elasticities between ecosystem services and wellbeing. International scientific community - through dissemination of findings via conferences, scientific publications (open access), and from conceptual and theoretical development and new understandings of the multiple linkages between ecosystem services and wellbeing. Regional African scientists will benefit specifically through open courses offered within the scope of the project, and through dissemination of results at regional venues. Our strategies to deliver impact and benefits include (1) identifying windows of opportunity within the context of ongoing coastal development processes to improve flows of benefits from ecosystems services to poor people, and (2) identifying and seeking to actively mitigate conflicted tradeoffs in Kenya and Mozambique.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SSH.2013.7.1-1 | Award Amount: 2.98M | Year: 2014

The project POst-CArbon CIties of TOmorrow foresight for sustainable pathways towards liveable, affordable and prospering cities in a world context (POCACITO) will develop an evidence-based 2050 roadmap for EU post-carbon cities. POCACITO facilitates the transition of EU cities to a forecasted sustainable or post-carbon economic model. The project focuses on towns, cities, megacities, metropolitan areas and urban clusters larger than 1 million people as well as small and medium-sized cities. POCACITOs approach uses participatory scenario development as a mutual learning and living lab environment strategy. The project recognises that post-carbon city transitions should improve urban resilience to fluctuating environmental and socio-economic pressure. Pressure in this context includes long-term changes in urban resident demographics, city and rural migration patterns, and potential city health concerns. Further, POCACITO develops innovative long-term outlooks for European post-carbon cities to address climate adaptation and urban environmental metabolism concerns by using a participatory city case study approach. Case study cities include Barcelona, Copenhagen/Malm, Istanbul, Lisbon, Litomerice, Milan/Turin, Offenburg and Zagreb. These cities will develop qualitative post-carbon visions with local stakeholders. Visions will be chosen based on selected best-practice measures and preliminary city assessments. Accompanying studies will yield a typology of post-carbon cities and a post-carbon city index. A marketplace of ideas will spread best practices from other EU cities and global cities in global emerging nations, allowing an international exchange of urban best practices. Related research will produce case study city roadmaps and an evidence-based 2050 roadmap for post-carbon EU cities within a global context. The projects research supports the sustainable development objective of the Europe 2020 strategy and the Innovation Union flagship initiative.


News Article | December 1, 2016
Site: en.prnasia.com

BEIJING, Dec. 1, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- An assessment tool for Chinese cities has been developed to measure Chinese cities' performance on sustainable development, based on a set of measurable indicators ranging from income, education, health to pollution, resource consumption, with an aim to help drive urban development towards a more inclusive and resilient future, says a new urbanization report by The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) in China. "The New Urban Agenda, launched during the UN Conference on Human Settlements (Habitat III), calls for cities to be safer, resilient and more sustainable, to lower carbon emissions and become cleaner and greener, and more inclusive, providing equal opportunities for all," noted Nicholas Rosellini, UN Resident Coordinator and UNDP Resident Representative in China. Launched during the 2016 International Forum on City Happiness and Sustainability in China, the UNDP's 2016 flagship report on sustainable urban development has established models and methods for the evaluation of urban sustainable development based on the China Sustainable Cities Index, a quantitative and objective evaluation system to assist cities in assessing their sustainability performance based on UNDP's Human Development Index (HDI), which has been applied to countries world-wide since 1990. Here it has been deployed at city level alongside the Urban Ecological Input Index (UEII), which measures resource consumption and pollution discharge. The Report evaluates 35 cities and categorizes them into 4 quadrants: high human development, low ecological input (sustainable); high human development, high ecological input (less sustainable); low human development, low ecological input (less sustainable); low human development, high ecological input (unsustainable). Additionally, the report gives recommendations for development paths for cities depending on their current development stage, whether they need to improve human development, decrease ecological input, or both. All of China's major cities score highly on UNDP's HDI in the report, due to continual investment in health, education and economic growth, meaning all major Chinese cities have reached the same level of development as developed countries globally. However, this has come at the expense of environmental well-being with the overall trend of the 35 cities included in the report consuming more resources and producing more pollution than in past years. Of the 35 cities evaluated in the report, Beijing, Hangzhou, Tianjin, Qingdao, Dalian, Shenyang, Changsha, and Jinan have taken crucial steps to shift to cleaner energy, investing in cleaner transportation, developing policies to limit sprawl, and improving waste management. The report recommends these efforts now need to be scaled up to include smaller cities that will see the most significant growth over the next few years. "To tackle the challenges in the process of urbanization, we must pursue sustainable development and ensure that China's cities are inclusive, safe and resilient. It is essential to balance social development and environmental protection to meet people's desire for a better and sustainable future" said Zhang Sutang, Vice President of Xinhua News Agency. In addition, China's sustainability efforts are examined in three case studies from Foshan and Guangzhou that demonstrate good sustainability practices linked to the indicators included in the Index.  The case from Wulong County, Chongqing, shows how the environmental protection policies instituted originally to support the tourism industry have become a driving force behind a wide range of economic development activities. Sustainable urbanization is a key focal area for UNDP globally and in China. UNDP just released its global Sustainable Urbanization Strategy which sets out UNDP's vision for sustainable, inclusive and resilient cities. In the future UNDP will continue to work with the Chinese Government and partners to promote the 2030 Agenda and New Urban Agenda, and ensure that Chinese cities are at the forefront of the global transition to a more sustainable future. Commissioned by UNDP and in association with Xinhua Oriental Outlook Weekly, the 2016 Report, entitled the '2016 China Sustainable Cities Report: Measuring Ecological and Human Development', was completed by an expert team comprised by Tongji University and UNDP China, and is the first report to offer recommendations on sustainable urban development in China since the recent Habitat III. UNDP partners with people at all levels of society to help build nations that can withstand crisis, and drive and sustain the kind of growth that improves the quality of life for everyone. On the ground in around 170 countries and territories, we offer global perspective and local insight to help empower lives and build resilient nations. www.undp.org Get in touch:                UNDP on Weibo| Media Contacts| WeChat ID: undpchina, QR code:


Honorees to be recognized at the AGENDA17 Conference FRAMINGHAM, MA--(Marketwired - November 14, 2016) - Computerworld -- the leading IT media brand dedicated to being the voice of business technology -- reveals the 2017 Computerworld Premier 100 Technology Leaders (click to tweet). One hundred leaders from technology and business are being acknowledged by Computerworld for their exceptional technology leadership and innovative approaches to business challenges. The honorees will be recognized during an awards ceremony at the AGENDA Conference, co-produced by CIO, Computerworld and the CIO Executive Council. The AGENDA17 conference will be held March 20-22, 2017, at Sawgrass Marriott Golf Resort & Spa in Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida. AGENDA is the business leadership conference focused on driving your business forward in changing times. At the 2017 conference, 300+ senior IT and line of business professionals will explore digital business demands including artificial intelligence (AI), Internet of Things (IoT), virtual reality and leadership in the digital economy, as well as hear first-hand experiences from experts and peers, including Premier 100 honorees. "The Premier 100 awards program highlights the exceptional work of an elite group of IT executives who are leading their organizations through times of unprecedented change. They are using technology to drive high-stakes business projects and create dynamic growth in their organizations," said Scot Finnie, editor-in-chief of Computerworld. "These 100 men and women are not only strategic business thinkers, but also team leaders who recognize the importance of recruiting and retaining the brightest talent to enable digital transformation and harness the opportunities of cloud, big data, mobile and social. We're pleased to recognize their leadership and honor their achievements." This year's Premier 100 honorees are not only leading their organizations through digital transformation, they are also launching cutting-edge projects that are helping their businesses thrive. This innovative spirit is cultivated throughout their organizations, driving team engagement and new business opportunities. "Maintaining status quo is no longer a business option. Organizations that cause disruption will quickly advance in their industry, and technology is often the force of this disruption," said Adam Dennison, SVP / General Manager, IDG Events & Publisher, CIO. "We are excited to recognize and bring together such a dynamic group of technology leaders at AGENDA17. Their stories will no doubt spark ideas in future winners and help elevate the technology industry overall." 2017 Premier 100 Honorees: Dimitris Agrafiotis, Chief data officer and head of technology products, Covance Peter Ambs, CIO, City of Albuquerque Peter Anderson, CIO, Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority Matthew Arvay, CIO, City of Virginia Beach, Va. Sami Ben Jamaa, Senior executive officer and CIO, Coca-Cola East Japan Timothy Birdsall, Senior vice president of Information Services and chief medical information officer, Cancer Treatment Centers of America Douglas Blackwell, Senior vice president and CIO, Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey Brett Bonner, Vice president, IT Research and Development, Kroger Daniel Bosman, Managing director and assistant vice president, TD Securities Gary Brantley, CIO, DeKalb County School District Michal Cenkl, Director of Innovation and Technology, Center for Information and Technology, Mitre Christopher Chang, Senior vice president and CIO, Darden Restaurants Samuel Chesterman, Worldwide CIO, IPG Mediabrands Abhishek Choudhary, Manager, Information Systems, Indian Oil William Confalonieri, Chief digital officer, CIO and vice president, Deakin University Paul Czarapata, Vice president and CIO, Kentucky Community & Technical College System Paul Daugherty, CTO, Accenture Lesley Dickie, Vice president, Global Business Services, IT, Raytheon Jim Dye, Director, Global IT Infrastructure, Pittsburgh Glass Works Saman Far, Senior vice president, technology, FINRA (Financial Industry Regulatory Authority) Kim Felix, Vice president, IT, UPS Airlines Jeff Fields, CIO, Servpro Harry Folloder, CIO, Advantage Waypoint Michael Garcia, Vice president, Development Services, Fannie Mae Rodell Garcia, Chief technology adviser, Manila Water Gint Grabauskas, CTO, VIxxo José Güereque, IT and innovation director, Arca Continental Saravanan Gurumurthy, CTO, ForwardLine Greg Hart, Vice president, Cloud Services, McKesson Joseph Haskell, CTO, Planned Systems International Chong Huan, CIO, The Inland Real Estate Group Konstandinos Kalpos, Senior advisor, Cybersecurity, U.S. Department of Homeland Security Mohit Kapoor, Chief information and technology officer, TransUnion Hakan Karamanli, Executive vice president and CIO, Tam Faktoring Jeffrey Keisling, Senior vice president and CIO, Business Technology, Pfizer Sajed Khan, Senior vice president and CIO, United Solutions Akash Khurana, Vice president and CIO, McDermott International Georgette Kiser, Managing director and CIO, The Carlyle Group Wolfgang Krips, Executive vice president, Global Operations, and general manager, Amadeus Data Processing George Labelle, CIO, Independent Purchasing Cooperative Jason Lei, General manager, Intelligence Product, MediaMath Paul Lough, Vice president, Technology Strategy and Planning, and CTO, Navy Federal Credit Union Ryan Loy, Vice president, IT, Adtran Nandu Mahadevan, Vice president, SaaS Operations, BMC Software Charles Mance, Director, Communications & Technology Support Services, The George Washington University Saran Mandair, Vice president, Production Operations & IT, Yapstone Dave McCandless, Vice president, IT, Navis Trevor McDougall, CIO, Open Colleges Scott McIsaac, CTO, Secure-24 Matthew Minetola, Executive vice president of technology, CIO, Travelport Sumit Nagpal, Co-founder, chief architect and UX officer, LumiraDx USA Robert Napoli, CIO, Planned Parenthood of the Great Northwest and the Hawaiian Islands Sarah Naqvi, Executive vice president, CIO, HMSHost Rafat Naqvi, Vice president, IT Services, Avanade Steven Narvaez, IT director and CIO, City of Deltona, Fla. Timothy Newman, Associate deputy assistance secretary, HR Automation, Systems and Analytics, Department of Veteran Affairs Niel Nickolaisen, Senior vice president and CTO, O.C. Tanner Jim Noel, Vice president, Software Services, Veterans United Home Loans Anthony Norris, Senior vice president, IT, FedEx Services Ken Piddington, CIO and executive advisor, MRE Consulting Phil Potloff, Chief digital officer, Edmunds Prabhakar Posam, Head of IT & Business Process, PAE Kaushik Ray, Vice president, Global Architecture and Customer Engineering, Sungard Availability Services Jamshid Rezaei, CIO, Mitel Olaf Romer, Head of corporate IT and group CIO, Baloise Group Douglas Rousso, Senior vice president and CTO, CBS Theresa Rowe, CIO, Oakland University Sanjay Saraf, Senior vice president and CTO, Western Union Digital, Western Union Robin Sarkar, CIO, Lakeland Health Sorabh Saxena, Senior vice president, Software Development & Engineering, AT&T Julie Schlabach, Senior director, Emerging Technology Services, Cerner Glenn Schneider, Executive vice president and CIO, Discover Financial Services Lori Scott, CIO, NatureServe Carlos Selonke, CIO, Santander Bank John Showalter, Chief health information officer, University of Mississippi Medical Center Shane Snider, Executive vice president, IT and Customer Care, SkillPath Seminars Scott Spradley, Senior vice president and CIO, Hewlett Packard Enterprise Sanjay Srinivasan, Vice president and chief technology architect, Business Engineering, Vonage Suresh Srinivasan, CTO, NYU Langone Medical Center Tom Stafford, Vice president and CIO, Halifax Health Raied Stanley, Vice president, Business Systems, Metropolitan Utilities District Alan Stukalsky, Managing director and CIO, North America, Randstad North America Ramakrishnan Sudarshanam, Divisional vice president, IT, United Breweries Mike Sutten, Senior vice president and CTO, Kaiser Permanente Thomson Thomas, Senior vice president, Business Systems and Technology, HDFC Standard Life Insurance Sean Valcamp, Chief information security officer, Avnet Robin Veit, Director, Client Engineering and Operations, Starz Radhika Venkatraman, Senior vice president and CIO, Network and Technology, Verizon Craig Walker, Vice president and Global CIO Shell Downstream, Shell International Petroleum Melissa Ward, Vice president, IT, Eurpac Service Creighton Warren, CIO, USG Florian Wegener, Vice president and head of global ecommerce, Qiagen Tommy Whitten, District technology coordinator, Madison County Schools Judd Williams, CIO, National Collegiate Athletic Association Richard Wilson, Chief, Solution Delivery, Defense Health Agency Lisa Woodley, Vice president, Digital Experience, NTT Data Naoto Yamamoto, Chief, Business Solutions, United Nations Development Programme Michael Young, Chief product security officer, Esri Michael Yzerman, Vice president and Deputy CIO, Community Health Systems Sigal Zarmi, CIO, Network and U.S., PwC AGENDA17 Sponsorship Opportunities We invite leading technology solution providers to join us at AGENDA17 through our various sponsorship opportunities, including the awards celebration. Please contact Adam Dennison, SVP / General Manager, IDG Events & Publisher, CIO at adennison@idgenterprise.com to learn more. Follow Computerworld on Twitter: @Computerworld and #Premier100 Follow IDG Enterprise on Twitter: @IDGEnterprise Join Computerworld on LinkedIn Like Computerworld on Facebook About the Premier 100 Technology Leadership Awards The Premier 100 program was created in 2000 to spotlight individuals who have had a positive impact on their organizations through technology. These are individuals who manage internal IT organizations, mentor and motivate their IT teams and business colleagues, create a positive work environment, envision innovative solutions to business challenges and effectively manage and execute IT strategies. Each year nominees are invited to complete a survey that addresses a number of topics, including their background and experience and their attitude toward risk and innovation. Using Computerworld's IT Leader Index, which is a measurement of how closely an individual matches our definition of the IT Leader, we analyze the data. Each year, 100 honorees are selected to receive this life-time recognition award. Information on previous honorees can be viewed at: http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9065479/Premier_100_IT_Leaders About AGENDA17 March 20-22, 2017 :: Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida :: AGENDAConference.com AGENDA is the business leadership conference focused on transforming business for the digital world. Transformation changes how companies look at technology, fostering conversations and partnerships among multiple business stakeholders. AGENDA17 brings together more than 300 senior IT and line of business leaders from a range of industries to develop action plans for the digital transformation at their organizations. This event creates a unique atmosphere for technology solution providers to integrate themselves into discussions during the strategic planning stage. About Computerworld Computerworld from IDG is the leading technology media brand helping senior IT, business decision-makers and key influencers navigate change with effective business strategy. As the voice of business technology, Computerworld enables the IT value chain with unique editorial coverage from setting strategies to deriving value. Computerworld's award-winning website (www.computerworld.com), focused conference series, strategic marketing solutions and research forms the hub of the world's largest (40+ edition) global IT media network and provides opportunities for IT vendors to engage this audience. Computerworld leads the industry with an online audience of over 7.2 million monthly page views (Omniture, January 2016 - March 2016 average) and was recognized in BtoB's 2013 Media Power 50 list; recognition Computerworld has received for more than 5 consecutive years. Computerworld is published by IDG Enterprise, a subsidiary of IDG. Company information is available at www.idgenterprise.com. About IDG IDG connects the world of tech buyers with insights, intent and engagement. IDG is the world's largest media, data and marketing services company that activates and engages the most influential technology buyers. Our premium brands, including CIO®, Computerworld®, PCWorld® and Macworld®, engage the most powerful audience of technology buyers providing essential guidance on the evolving technology landscape. Our global data intelligence platform activates purchasing intent, powering our clients' success. IDG Marketing Services creates custom content with marketing impact across video, mobile, social and digital. We execute complex campaigns that fulfill marketers' global ambitions seamlessly with consistency that delivers results and wins awards. IDG is the #1 tech media company in the world, per comScore.*


News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: www.nature.com

It is astonishing to many that lakes and rivers account for less than one-third of 1% of global fresh water. Some 95% of unfrozen fresh water resides unsung and underground, dimly visible at the bottom of a well or gushing from a pump. Big cities such as Buenos Aires and entire countries, including Germany, depend hugely on groundwater. About 70% of it goes into irrigation, accounting for more than half of irrigated agriculture — which in turn provides nearly half of the global food basket. In large parts of India, groundwater is egregiously overdrawn. And everywhere, aquifers are poorly measured and managed. As a result, no scientific consensus exists on the details of this vast and vital source of fresh water — although there is consensus on the fact that we face a worldwide problem. In High and Dry, hydrologist William Alley and science writer Rosemary Alley encapsulate the crisis in a description of the US High Plains Aquifer, which spans eight states from South Dakota to Texas. “This virtual ocean of groundwater, which accumulated over thousands of years, is being used up in decades,” they write. In three ways, the book provides a deep and broad understanding of groundwater use and abuse, mostly in the United States but with some international scope. First, it abounds in case studies, many centring on grand, polarizing projects. In the early twentieth century, engineer William Mulholland fomented water wars in California by diverting the Owens River to Los Angeles; that process has ultimately led to groundwater pumping in the Owens Valley. Today, Texas tycoon T. Boone Pickens has tried to sell water from the Ogallala Aquifer to municipalities. In the mid-1980s, Libyan leader Mu'ammer Gaddafi masterminded the Great Man-Made River, a piping system fed by the Nubian Sandstone Aquifer, to service the country's dry reaches. India, the Alleys show, swiftly progressed from famine to food exporting beginning in the 1960s. That astonishing development was driven mostly by private pumps (16 million of them as of 2010) using free electricity to pull water from an ever-lower water table. The authors also delve into Australia's Murray–Darling basin, which has been overpumped and overused, largely because of allocations based on volumes in high-water years. And they explore how water politics in apartheid-era South Africa denied non-whites adequate water rights for rural development. These stories are crucial to global understanding of current imbroglios, and they are told with verve. The second achievement of High and Dry is its excellent distillation of aquifer science. There are clear descriptions of how geology and geography affect the depth or movement of water, the relation of aquifers to stream flow and how these stores recharge. Pollution of aquifers by pesticides, fertilizers, pharmaceuticals and arsenic is thoroughly laid out, as is arsenic poisoning, which remains slow and expensive to treat. The Alleys show how artesian wells can push pressurized water into the atmosphere and aquifer depletion can cause subsidence of metres per decade, which plays havoc with railways and sewers. Finally, the book unpicks the tangles that impede groundwater governance. In the United States, the “secret, occult and concealed” nature of the resource, as an 1861 court ruling had it, rendered regulation impossible. US history accordingly reveals a rich tapestry of legal suits, counter suits, interstate conflicts, water theft, treaties, compacts, agreements, accords, lobbying, bullying and temporizing. Yet national water governance is slowly finding ways to measure and manage water use as technology and awareness grow. In the American West there are several, sometimes competing, fundamental water laws. “First in time, first in right” means that, during shortages, the earliest registered licence holders get all of the water specified in their licence. The “law of the biggest pump” means that those who can pump it, own it. Water and water rights can be bought and sold: large Californian cities buy huge water allocations from farmers. Quebec in Canada, where the legal system enshrines the public good over individual rights, has moved more easily towards management. But the Alleys find few unalloyed successes. Under Governor Jerry Brown, California has used the severe droughts of the past decade to create a credible, and broadly supported, groundwater-management agenda. The Murray–Darling region, however, has gone one step forward, one back. In the 2000s, it moved towards a federally managed system based mostly on the public good, but backed off as the rains returned. The Alleys do examine aquifer replenishment. They cover wastewater recycling through tried and true reverse osmosis, and the increasing use of microorganisms and innovative technologies. They look at rainwater collection in ponds, and well replenishment. But there is little detail, particularly on the actual capacity for meeting challenges. More problematic is the book's US-centrism: Arizona occupies 23 pages, India just 11. Measurements are not primarily metric, which demands translation. And the sub-Saharan sections, concentrating on the work of non-governmental organizations (NGOs), are thin — although they do at least pick up on a fundamental problem. NGOs, engineers and aid programmes come, drill a well and leave. Eventually, the well empties. The well could empty for millions more. The United Nations Development Programme notes that, in 2011, more than 40 countries experienced water stress; of those, 10 have nearly depleted their renewable freshwater supply. By 2050, one in four people globally may be hit by periodic shortages. The near future could see refugee numbers swell, to include more people without water. Yet High and Dry, like so many books on the environment, is stronger on issues than fixes. More mapping, more statistical detail and a tougher editor might have helped to contextualize and clarify the riches of this book.


News Article | November 21, 2016
Site: en.prnasia.com

SINGAPORE, Nov. 21, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and Global Initiatives, Singapore will welcome over 600 business & sustainability leaders, senior government officials, UN agencies, NGOs from across the globe for the Responsible Business Forum on Sustainable Development (RBF) in Singapore on 22-24 November 2016. Large-scale conferences tend to be highly resource-intensive with major sources of greenhouse gas emissions, pollution and waste for the host city and residents. Taking the environmental impact into consideration, the 5th Responsible Business Forum in Singapore sets itself the ambitious target to be Asia's first Zero Waste to Landfill Zero Emission Event, underpinning its commitment to a sustainable economy not only with the issues addressed in the programme but also in the logistics of putting the event together. This is the first time such efforts have been undertaken at a large-scale business conference in Asia. "With 2016 as yet another hottest year on record, it is now urgent to innovate, scale up and increase efficiency to achieve the SDG's," explains Haoliang Xu, UN Assistant Secretary-General and UNDP Director for Asia-Pacific. "The zero-waste zero-emission Responsible Business Forum leads by example on how this can be accomplished." "As we engage the business community here at RBF to break new ground on their existing sustainability commitments, we need to 'walk the talk' ourselves in running the event. We also want to get everyone thinking about how much each single plastic cup, plane ride, conference badge actually impacts the earth," explains Tony Gourlay, CEO, Responsible Business Forum, Global Initiatives. Together with Marina Bay Sands (MBS), RBF's venue sustainability partner and with their Sands ECO360° programme, everything has been minutely reviewed from food to napkins to stage set decorations in order to raise the bar exponentially this year to minimise the waste and footprint during the event, wherever possible, to reduce its carbon footprint and overall environmental impact. "This is our fourth and most ambitious Responsible Business Forum event to date. We have initiated solutions to meet the Forum's high sustainability targets each year, but this year is particularly exciting as it is Marina Bay Sands' first-ever Zero Waste to Landfill event. We are sparing no efforts to calibrate our services to minimise all waste produced within the boundaries of the event's footprint," says Kevin Teng, Executive Director of Sustainability, Marina Bay Sands. RBF Singapore will be audited on all its sustainability efforts including the zero-waste to landfill, zero emission targets and certified by SACEOS (Singapore Association of Convention and Exhibition Organisers and Suppliers) on its Management Approach, Waste, Energy, Water, Community, Human Resources with the MICE Sustainability Certification (MSC), an initiative by supported by the Singapore Tourism Board's Sustainable Event Guidelines. MBS will provide RBF with a sustainability impact statement that captures the event's sustainability highlights and tracked usage data report. RBF will then publish a comprehensive sustainability report about a month after the event. Key impact issues that RBF faces include carbon emissions created by the high volume of international flights to Singapore for delegates, food waste, stage set production waste, delegates communication materials, catering as well as a high energy demand for the event.  In order for RBF to achieve its zero waste to landfill goal and be a zero-emission event, here are some highlights of measures taken: No printed programmes or business cards -- RBF has a bespoke live mobile app with live session Q&A, integration with LinkedIn and social media that enables live chat with participants, digital programme and media events schedule Read Media Factsheet here for zero waste details What cannot be recycled will be offset. All carbon emissions from over 200 international flights to and from Singapore related to the event will be 100 % carbon offset through our offset partner South Pole Group. At last year's RBF, 207 tonnes of carbon dioxide were generated - 92% were due to international flights, all of which was offset by RBF. With a much higher number of participants, this year's zero-emission target estimates to offset approximately 320 tonnes of carbon dioxide on transportation. This year's zero waste to landfill ambition is expected to contribute positively to the emissions balance of the conference and save an additional 130 kg carbon dioxide. Global Initiatives, organiser of Responsible Business Forum Global Initiatives is an international company based in Singapore that promotes sustainable partnership solutions to global challenges through film, media projects and public-private initiative driven events. The Responsible Business Forum (RBF) global event series help drive sustainable industry solutions through public-private partnerships that enhance responsible business growth. www.globalinitiatives.com UNDP (United Nations Development Programme) partners with people at all levels of society to help build nations that can withstand crisis, and drive and sustain the kind of growth that improves the quality of life for everyone. On the ground in more than 170 countries and territories, we offer global perspective and local insight to help empower lives and build resilient nations. www.undp.org


News Article | December 7, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

What:  United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the world’s largest multilateral development agency, present in nearly 170 countries and territories, will visit the Nasdaq MarketSite in Times Square in celebration of its 50th anniversary and inaugural Global Goals Gala, Night for Change. In honor of the occasion, Michael O’Neill, UN Assistant Secretary-General and Director of UNDP’s Bureau of External Relations and Advocacy will ring the opening bell. UNDP this week celebrated 50 years at the frontline of development and its leading role in realising the Global Goals, an ambitious plan to end poverty and protect the planet by 2030, with its inaugural gala at Philips in Manhattan. Corporate partners Tribal Planet, Deutsche Post DHL and Baidu received the UNDP People and Planet Award in recognition of their accomplishments. When: Thursday, December 8, 2016 – 9:15 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. ET Social Media: For multimedia features such as exclusive content, photo postings, status updates and video of bell ceremonies, please visit our Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/NASDAQ. For photos from ceremonies and events, please visit our Instagram page: http://instagram.com/nasdaq For livestream of ceremonies and events, please visit our YouTube page: http://www.youtube.com/nasdaq/live For news tweets, please visit our Twitter page: http://twitter.com/nasdaq For exciting viral content and ceremony photos, please visit our Tumblr page: http://nasdaq.tumblr.com/ Webcast: A live stream of the Nasdaq Opening Bell will be available at: https://new.livestream.com/nasdaq/live or http://www.nasdaq.com/about/marketsitetowervideo.asx Photos: To obtain a hi-resolution photograph of the Market Open, please go to http://business.nasdaq.com/discover/market-bell-ceremonies and click on the market open of your choice. About United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) UNDP partners with people at all levels of society to help build nations that can withstand crisis, and drive and sustain the kind of growth that improves the quality of life for everyone. On the ground in nearly 170 countries and territories, we offer global perspective and local insight to help empower lives and build resilient nations. About Nasdaq Nasdaq (Nasdaq:NDAQ) is a leading provider of trading, clearing, exchange technology, listing, information and public company services across six continents. Through its diverse portfolio of solutions, Nasdaq enables customers to plan, optimize and execute their business vision with confidence, using proven technologies that provide transparency and insight for navigating today's global capital markets. As the creator of the world's first electronic stock market, its technology powers more than 70 marketplaces in 50 countries, and 1 in 10 of the world's securities transactions. Nasdaq is home to more than 3,700 listed companies with a market value of $10.0 trillion and approximately 18,000 corporate clients. To learn more, visit: nasdaq.com/ambition or business.nasdaq.com


News Article | November 4, 2016
Site: www.PR.com

A New Initiative to Achieve the Sustainable Development Goals in India Los Angeles, CA, November 04, 2016 --( Work in India will focus on ending poverty, ensuring inclusive, quality education, achieving gender equality and women’s empowerment, and promoting inclusive and sustainable economic growth, employment and decent work for all. The Platform was launched in 2014 with support from the Conrad N. Hilton, Ford and The MasterCard Foundations, with a number of other funders joining over the last year, including Oak Foundation support for the work in India. Heather Grady, Vice President at Rockefellter Philanthropy Advisors, welcomed Avasant Foundation into the SDG Philanthropy Platform. “We applaud Avasant Foundation for being the first member of the India Founders Circle and, along with the Oak Foundation, helping to catalyze philanthropy’s commitment to collaborative approaches to the SDGs in India.” Kevin Parikh, Chairman of Avasant Foundation, noted that “advancing the Sustainable Development Goals is critical to Avasant Foundation’s mission of empowering disadvantaged youth across the globe. The partnership with the SDG Philanthropy Platform illustrates how we are aligned in our mission for India given our focus on quality education, gender equality, and decent work and economic growth.” Avasant Foundation’s Executive Director Chitra Rajeshwari sees the “challenges, but even more the opportunities, to make real progress working together - not only in India but in other countries around the world,” and is helping to plan the 2017 launch. Radhika Shah, Co-President of Stanford Angels & Entrepreneurs and an Advisor to the Platform, linked the vision of Agenda 2030 with India’s most famous visionary – Mahatma Gandhi. "We are excited to launch the SDG Philanthropy Platform in the land of Mahatma Gandhi to advance his vision of a world that respects the dignity of every human being via self-reliance. We aim to bring together very different but equally committed stakeholders from within India and outside. We will draw on outstanding entrepreneurial and systems-change approaches from Stanford University and UCLA, and link technology innovation from networks such as Stanford Angels and Entrepreneurs, the South Asian diaspora in Silicon Valley, and universities in India including the IITs.” This week’s announcement follows a commitment made by the Platform team at the 7th Annual Global Entrepreneurship Summit, hosted by President Obama, in Silicon Valley in June 2016. The 8th Summit in 2017 will be held in India. (https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2016/06/24/fact-sheet-global-entrepreneurship-summit) For more information, and to find out how to become a supporter of the SDG Philanthropy Platform in India, contact Radhika Shah at radhika@cs.stanford.edu or Karolina Mzyk-Callias at karolina.myzk@undp.org. Follow the discussion on Twitter: #phil2015 @philSDGs About The SDG Philanthropy Platform The SDG Philanthropy Platform informs and catalyzes collaboration through building awareness and connections between those working in the philanthropy sector and beyond. Launched by the United Nations Development Program, Foundation Center, and Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors in 2014, the Platform has brought together hundreds of foundations and philanthropists across many countries to create new partnerships to increase funding and create programs that will have greater, and more sustainable, impact on people’s lives. For more information, visit: www.sdgfunders.org (http://www.sdgfunders.org) About the United Nations Development Programme The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) partners with people around the world to help build nations that can withstand crisis, and drive and sustain the kind of growth that improves the quality of life for everyone. On the ground in more than 170 countries and territories, we offer a global perspective and local insight to help empower lives and build resilient nations. www.undp.org (http://www.undp.org/) About Avasant Foundation Avasant Foundation improves lives and communities by empowering high potential, disadvantaged youth in developing countries through education, employment & entrepreneurship in the new digital economy. Avasant Foundation leverages the expertise and relationships of Avasant, a global management strategy firm, in achieving the Foundation’s mission. (http://www.avasantfoundation.org) About Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors (RPA) is a nonprofit organization that advises on and manages more than $200 million in annual giving by foundations, philanthropists and corporations. Founded in 2002 and continuing the Rockefeller family's legacy of thoughtful, effective philanthropy, RPA has a diverse team led by experienced grantmakers with significant depth of knowledge across the spectrum of issue areas. RPA has facilitated more than $3 billion in grantmaking to, and within, nearly 70 countries. www.rockpa.org (http://www.rockpa.org/) About Foundation Center Established in 1956, Foundation Center is the leading source of information about philanthropy worldwide. Through data, analysis, and training, it connects people who want to change the world to the resources they need to succeed. Foundation Center maintains the most comprehensive database on U.S. and, increasingly, global grantmakers and their grants -- a robust, accessible knowledge bank for the sector. It also operates research, education, and training programs designed to advance knowledge of philanthropy at every level. (http://foundationcenter.org) Los Angeles, CA, November 04, 2016 --( PR.com )-- As India marked its national holiday of Diwali, the SDG Philanthropy Platform, a growing collaborative promoting sustainable development, announced its second founding supporter for the initiative in India – the Avasant Foundation. The Platform in India will connect and catalyze partnerships between philanthropic organizations, grantees and partners, the UN system, government, academia, impact investors and the broader business community in order to accelerate achievement of Agenda 2030 – a set of 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) – agreed by all the world’s governments in September 2015. The Platform’s website www.sdgfunders.org will also document how philanthropy is investing in the SDGs across India and promote exchange across those working on shared goals.Work in India will focus on ending poverty, ensuring inclusive, quality education, achieving gender equality and women’s empowerment, and promoting inclusive and sustainable economic growth, employment and decent work for all. The Platform was launched in 2014 with support from the Conrad N. Hilton, Ford and The MasterCard Foundations, with a number of other funders joining over the last year, including Oak Foundation support for the work in India. Heather Grady, Vice President at Rockefellter Philanthropy Advisors, welcomed Avasant Foundation into the SDG Philanthropy Platform. “We applaud Avasant Foundation for being the first member of the India Founders Circle and, along with the Oak Foundation, helping to catalyze philanthropy’s commitment to collaborative approaches to the SDGs in India.” Kevin Parikh, Chairman of Avasant Foundation, noted that “advancing the Sustainable Development Goals is critical to Avasant Foundation’s mission of empowering disadvantaged youth across the globe. The partnership with the SDG Philanthropy Platform illustrates how we are aligned in our mission for India given our focus on quality education, gender equality, and decent work and economic growth.” Avasant Foundation’s Executive Director Chitra Rajeshwari sees the “challenges, but even more the opportunities, to make real progress working together - not only in India but in other countries around the world,” and is helping to plan the 2017 launch.Radhika Shah, Co-President of Stanford Angels & Entrepreneurs and an Advisor to the Platform, linked the vision of Agenda 2030 with India’s most famous visionary – Mahatma Gandhi. "We are excited to launch the SDG Philanthropy Platform in the land of Mahatma Gandhi to advance his vision of a world that respects the dignity of every human being via self-reliance. We aim to bring together very different but equally committed stakeholders from within India and outside. We will draw on outstanding entrepreneurial and systems-change approaches from Stanford University and UCLA, and link technology innovation from networks such as Stanford Angels and Entrepreneurs, the South Asian diaspora in Silicon Valley, and universities in India including the IITs.”This week’s announcement follows a commitment made by the Platform team at the 7th Annual Global Entrepreneurship Summit, hosted by President Obama, in Silicon Valley in June 2016. The 8th Summit in 2017 will be held in India. (https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2016/06/24/fact-sheet-global-entrepreneurship-summit)For more information, and to find out how to become a supporter of the SDG Philanthropy Platform in India, contact Radhika Shah at radhika@cs.stanford.edu or Karolina Mzyk-Callias at karolina.myzk@undp.org.Follow the discussion on Twitter: #phil2015 @philSDGsAbout The SDG Philanthropy PlatformThe SDG Philanthropy Platform informs and catalyzes collaboration through building awareness and connections between those working in the philanthropy sector and beyond. Launched by the United Nations Development Program, Foundation Center, and Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors in 2014, the Platform has brought together hundreds of foundations and philanthropists across many countries to create new partnerships to increase funding and create programs that will have greater, and more sustainable, impact on people’s lives. For more information, visit: www.sdgfunders.org (http://www.sdgfunders.org)About the United Nations Development ProgrammeThe United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) partners with people around the world to help build nations that can withstand crisis, and drive and sustain the kind of growth that improves the quality of life for everyone. On the ground in more than 170 countries and territories, we offer a global perspective and local insight to help empower lives and build resilient nations. www.undp.org (http://www.undp.org/)About Avasant FoundationAvasant Foundation improves lives and communities by empowering high potential, disadvantaged youth in developing countries through education, employment & entrepreneurship in the new digital economy. Avasant Foundation leverages the expertise and relationships of Avasant, a global management strategy firm, in achieving the Foundation’s mission. (http://www.avasantfoundation.org)About Rockefeller Philanthropy AdvisorsRockefeller Philanthropy Advisors (RPA) is a nonprofit organization that advises on and manages more than $200 million in annual giving by foundations, philanthropists and corporations. Founded in 2002 and continuing the Rockefeller family's legacy of thoughtful, effective philanthropy, RPA has a diverse team led by experienced grantmakers with significant depth of knowledge across the spectrum of issue areas. RPA has facilitated more than $3 billion in grantmaking to, and within, nearly 70 countries. www.rockpa.org (http://www.rockpa.org/)About Foundation CenterEstablished in 1956, Foundation Center is the leading source of information about philanthropy worldwide. Through data, analysis, and training, it connects people who want to change the world to the resources they need to succeed. Foundation Center maintains the most comprehensive database on U.S. and, increasingly, global grantmakers and their grants -- a robust, accessible knowledge bank for the sector. It also operates research, education, and training programs designed to advance knowledge of philanthropy at every level. (http://foundationcenter.org) Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from Avasant

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