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News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

NEW YORK & BOGOTA, Colombia--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Today the Hon. Anil C. Singh stayed all discovery in Kingsland Holdings Ltd.’s lawsuit attempting to prevent Avianca Holdings S.A.’s strategic alliance with United Airlines. In doing so, the Court rejected Kingsland’s request for expedited discovery, which Avianca believes was intended solely to derail the Company’s negotiations with United. Avianca continues to explore an alliance with United, a critical component of the Company’s strategy to become the leading Latin American airline. Avianca is pleased with today’s outcome and looks forward to the Court’s consideration of its motion to dismiss Kingsland’s lawsuit. Avianca believes the lawsuit is entirely baseless and without merit. Avianca Holdings S.A. (NYSE: AVH) (BVC:PFAVH) comprises the airlines: Aerovías del Continente Americano S.A. Avianca (Avianca), Tampa Cargo S.A.S., incorporated in Colombia, Aerolineas Galapagos S.A. - Aerogal, incorporated in Ecuador, and the TACA Group companies: TACA International Airlines S.A., incorporated in El Salvador, Lineas Aereas Costarricenses S.A., LACSA, incorporated in Costa Rica, Trans Américan Airlines S.A., incorporated in Perú, Servicios Aéreos Nacionales S.A., SANSA, incorporated in Costa Rica, Aerotaxis La Costeña S.A., incorporated in Nicaragua, Isleña de Inversiones S.A. de C.V., ISLEÑA, incorporated in Honduras and Aviateca S.A., incorporated in Guatemala.


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

It's not a good year for United, as everyone knows, and even their genuine PR attempts to get their reputation back up are being mocked relentlessly. SEE ALSO: That Wendy's chicken nugget teen just beat Ellen's Twitter record In April, Carter Wilkerson went on a mission to achieve 18 million retweets in order to get a year's supply of Wendy's chicken nuggets and United offered him a free flight. When the teenager made history with the most retweeted tweet of all time, the airline thought it was a good idea to jump on the bandwagon and remind him of the deal: Naturally, people were not having it: United Airlines came under fire after a video of a man being forcibly removed from an overbooked flight surfaced online. The company was earlier criticised for banning two girls wearing leggings from a flight. In the last PR disaster, a giant rabbit named Simon died on a United London-to-Chicago flight.


The airline moved to settle quickly, likely because it had much more to lose by going to court against Dr. Dao Last month, a settlement was reached between Doctor David Dao and United Airlines in the now infamous April 9 incident in which the doctor was forcefully removed from a flight by police in Chicago. Los Angeles Personal Injury Attorney Belal Hamideh said the incident has prompted an important case study in personal injury cases. The incident was caught on cellphone video and has since been virally distributed around the world. The public reaction was swift against United Airlines, and there was not much that could be done to pass blame to Dr. Dao, as the incident was caught on video by several passengers. According to Hamideh, the publicized video accounts show that Dao was not exhibiting any threat to safety, nor was he being a disruption. The video does appear to show the police officers showing an unreasonable amount of force. Dao is said to have suffered a broken nose, concussion and had two teeth knocked out when he was thrown into an adjacent armrest. According to Dao's lawyer, Thomas A. Demetrio, Dao will require reconstructive nose surgery. Now that a settlement has been reached, Hamideh estimates amounts that Dao should be entitled to that stem directly from the incident. Past medical expenses incurred immediately after the incident may range close to $100,000. Future medical expenses are likely to include treatment for concussion syndrome, dental and nasal surgery and can safely be estimated at close to $300,000. Dao can also be entitled to damages for pain and suffering somewhere in the range of $1-2 million according to Hamideh. Hamideh added that if the case would have gone to court, they could have faced punitive damages up to nine times the case value. "Now the kicker is that there probably would be imposition of punitive damages, since dragging him off the plane was a reckless act with disregard for his well-being, so the total damages can be multiplied up to 9 times, which would bring total damages to roughly $10 million," said Hamideh. Hamideh points out that due to how highly-publicized the incident was, a jury may offer very high judgments against defendants in order to put other airlines on notice in regards to similar risky and negligent business practices. In addition, another significant amount the airline would be liable for would have been the emotional stress that Dao experienced; he was caught on camera visibly distraught and possibly in shock after the incident. He adds that in the event of last month's settlement, part of the airline's agreement with Dr. Dao would likely include that he would not speak publicly about the incident, nor negatively about the airline in a public forum. A spokesperson for United said that the settlement that was reached was amicable. The incident had prompted a major public relations crisis for the airline, including massive calls for boycotts in China, where the airline is trying to gain a foothold in the airline market. For press inquiries on the matter, contact Belal Hamideh Law at (213) 335-6282


NASSAU, Bahamas--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Kingsland Holdings Limited (“Kingsland”), the largest minority shareholder of Avianca Holdings S.A. (“Avianca”), today issued a statement in response to a misleading securities filing issued by Avianca on May 5, 2017 regarding the vote on Kingsland’s motion to appoint an independent auditor to examine numerous related party transactions that Avianca has entered into with the controlling shareholder, Synergy Aerospace Corporation (“Synergy”), and other entities affiliated with Synergy and Germán Efromovich. “In a securities filing issued on May 5, 2017, Avianca misleadingly states that, at the Extraordinary Shareholders Meeting, controlling shareholder Synergy supported the motion by Kingsland to appoint an independent auditor. In fact, Synergy rejected Kingsland’s highly qualified auditor candidate, and insisted instead that the auditor be appointed by the Audit Committee of Avianca. This is fundamentally at odds with the spirit of Kingsland’s motion and yet again demonstrates Efromovich’s determination to avoid any checks on his power. Synergy’s ploy to involve the Audit Committee is a smokescreen intended to stall the appointment of an auditor and create the appearance of transparency. Because the Audit Committee’s membership consists entirely of directors appointed by Synergy, the committee and any auditor it appoints will answer to Efromovich. Further, it is the same Audit Committee that examined and recommended in recent years that the Board of Directors approve the very same 30-plus related party transactions that purportedly will be audited. Kingsland believes these transactions have, at the expense of the company and its minority shareholders, diverted hundreds of millions of dollars’ worth of Avianca assets to projects of Germán Efromovich and Synergy, a matter which should be investigated by the authorities. These types of practices fly in the face of appropriate corporate governance. Kingsland is seeking a truly independent auditor that will conduct an unbiased audit and thereby determine whether and how much Avianca and all its minority stockholders have been injured by Synergy's control of Avianca. It is clear that when seeking to investigate related party transactions, the parties to such transactions (Avianca and Synergy in this case) should not be the ones appointing the independent auditor. The independent auditor should audit on behalf of the minority shareholders, the authorities, the creditors and other relevant stakeholders, not on behalf of the parties involved. This self-serving behavior is in line with the deal Efromovich is negotiating with United Airlines under which Kingsland believes hundreds of millions of dollars from United would flow directly to his holding company, Synergy, with few of the monetary benefits flowing to Avianca and its minority stockholders. In light of these events, Kingsland will exercise the rights it has at its disposal in the Panamanian courts.” On March 8, 2017, Kingsland announced it had formally requested an extraordinary meeting of shareholders to consider appointing an independent auditor, in light of the many related party transactions that Mr. Efromovich has caused, and is continuing to cause, Avianca to enter into with his affiliates, and the one-sided nature of such transactions that favor Synergy at the expense of Avianca’s other shareholders. Arbitrarily, the shareholders meeting to consider this request was only convened almost two months after it had been requested by Kingsland. On February 28, 2017, Kingsland filed a lawsuit in New York State Court challenging Synergy’s and Mr. Efromovich’s conduct with respect to Avianca. Court filings by Synergy on March 27, 2017 concede that it is actively negotiating with United to obtain funds for itself as part of a United-Avianca transaction, just as Kingsland has alleged in its lawsuit. As a significant shareholder, Kingsland Holdings is deeply committed to the long-term success of Avianca and is pursuing this action to protect the viability of the company and safeguard the interests of all minority shareholders.


News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (AP) — Irate passengers swarmed ticket counters and some started a near-riot at Fort Lauderdale's airport after Spirit Airlines canceled nine flights, blaming the decision on pilots' failure to show up. Hundreds were left stranded at the airlines' Florida terminal late Monday. The chaos was the latest instance of airlines dealing with high-profile customer frustration. Problems began last month with cellphone video capturing a passenger being dragged off a United Airlines flight. Other horror stories from customers surfaced later involving flights on Delta and American airlines. Deputies arrested three people from New York in the Fort Lauderdale airport, charging them with inciting a riot, disorderly conduct, resisting arrest and trespassing. The Broward Sheriff's Office said about 500 people were crowded into Spirit's terminal at Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport late Monday night after the airline canceled the flights because there were no pilots. Video posted online showed deputies grappling with screaming passengers and breaking up fights. The discount airline says pilots are refusing to pick up open flying assignments, which Spirit claims is an illegal and concerted plot by the Air Line Pilots Association to apply pressure during contract negotiations. It has filed a lawsuit, saying it has had to cancel about 300 flights nationally and internationally over the past week because of the union's actions. Another 36 were canceled Tuesday. Federal District Judge William P. Dimitrouleas issued a temporary restraining order against the union Tuesday, ordering its member pilots to not engage in any boycotts or slowdown, saying that would violate federal law. Spirit spokesman Paul Berry issued a statement apologizing to customers and saying the company is "shocked and saddened" by the Fort Lauderdale melee. "We believe this is the result of intimidation tactics by a limited number of our pilots affecting the behavior of the larger group," Berry said. The union has denied the accusation, but said in a statement that its members will obey the judge's order with the goal of helping Spirit resume normal operations. Airline analyst Robert Mann said it doesn't take many pilots calling in sick or refusing to accept extra shifts for Spirit or any airline to find itself in the position of having to cancel numerous flights. An airline doesn't have that many reserve pilots on call, he said, and they have to be in the right place to step in. "There's not much they can do," he said. Sheriff's reports released Tuesday say 22-year-old Desmond Waul of Selden, New York, and 24-year-old Janice Waul and 22 year-old Davante Garrett, both of Brentwood, New York, were seen by deputies threatening the airline's front counter employees. Deputies said their actions caused the crowd to become increasingly aggressive to the point of near-violence and that they wouldn't leave when ordered. When deputies tried to arrest them, they said the three threatened them and resisted efforts to handcuff them. They were being held Tuesday at the Broward jail in lieu of $10,000 bond each. It's unclear whether they have lawyers. Jennifer Glann said at the airport Tuesday that she was in the crowd Monday night, trying to get home to New Haven, Connecticut. She said conditions were "awful" and "horrible." "There was nowhere to stand, nowhere to sit," she said. Employees were forcing people to go outside, she said. Soon, scuffles started. "People were getting arrested left and right." Paul Yankowitz of Newark, New Jersey, said he tried to remain calm as the crowd became enraged. He didn't think the cancellations were worth getting angry about. "It sucks but like anything else in this life, life is short and you can't get stressed," he said. Fort Lauderdale airport was the scene of a mass shooting in January that killed five people and wounded six. It happened in another terminal on the opposite side of the airport. Airport spokesman Greg Meyer said Tuesday that the airport staff has added security agents and other staff at the terminal to help Spirit. He said passengers are often anxious before flying, so any serious disruption can aggravate matters. Three more flights were canceled Tuesday. "For many people, airline travel is very challenging. A lot of people don't do it frequently, so they are nervous anyway. When your flight is canceled and you need to be somewhere at a certain time it is an imposition and we understand that. The airport tries to work with our airline partner to work with our passengers," Meyer said. Associated Press Airlines Writer David Koenig in Dallas contributed to this report.


News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: www.cnet.com

Carter Wilkerson's tweet begging Wendy's for a free one-year supply of chicken nuggets has become the most retweeted tweet of all time at 3.43 million and counting, surpassing Ellen DeGeneres' famous 2014 Oscars selfie, Guinness World Records said Tuesday. It began when the 16-year-old from Reno, Nevada, jokingly asked the fast-food chain on April 5 how many retweets it would take to get the nuggets. Wendy's replied with an absurd 18 million, spurring the hashtag #NuggsforCarter and an emoji. The tweet went viral instantly, reaching more than a million retweets in two days. Wilkerson also gained fame as he was mentioned in tweets by celebrities, politicians and strangers. Soon, companies including United Airlines and T-Mobile began offering Wilkerson free stuff. Check out the tweet from T-Mobile CEO John Legere: Silicon Valley also jumped in with Google, Amazon and Microsoft joining in support of Wilkerson's free nuggets' goal. The #NuggsforCarter challenge attracted a wide audience ranging from gamers, political junkies and pop culture enthusiasts, according to Affinio, which analyzes social media platforms. "It's definitely unique and admirable how much traction he's been able to get," said Affinio spokeswoman Maura Woodman about Wilkerson. "Remember Ken Bone (the bright-red sweater guy from the presidential debate)? He lasted about seven days. Carter Wilkerson is getting way more mileage." Wilkerson's challenge also spawned a website, cartervsellen.com, to track the challenge. As the teen saw his Twitter account spike from 138 followers on April 1 to now more than 105,000 (and earning a blue verification badge), the social network even kept count: But Wilkerson decided to take the attention a step further and made #NuggsforCarter into a fundraising campaign. He created custom T-shirts promoting the campaign with all proceeds going to the Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption. He's encouraged his Twitter followers to also donate to Pinocchio's Moms on the Run, a Reno-based organization that provides support services to women with breast cancer and their families. The "engaging presence" Wilkerson has was key to the viral success of his campaign, said Lizz Kannenberg, Director of Content at Sprout Social, a social media management platform for businesses. On her talk show, DeGeneres chatted about her record possibly being broken by "Nugget Boy" a week after Wilkerson's plea, when his tweet reached 2.6 million retweets. "Stop it right now," she joked. "I worked so hard to set that record ... and this guy asked for nuggets?" Wilkerson eventually appeared on her show and the two posed for a selfie together. Now, with the retweet record broken, Wendy's said it would indeed give Wilkerson free chicken nuggets for a year, even though he's far from 18 million retweets. Wendy's also said it would donate $100,000 in his name to the Dave Thomas Foundation. First published May 9, 9:01 a.m. PT. Update, 12:30 p.m.: Adds comment from social media analysis expert. CNET Magazine: Check out a sample of the stories in CNET's newsstand edition. Tech Enabled: CNET chronicles tech's role in providing new kinds of accessibility.


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

It is very difficult to change consumers’ minds about a company and its products, and winning back “trust” is easier said than done. Following allegations that it forced a woman to urinate in cups after refusing to let her use the lavatory, United Airlines made headlines yet again this week after a video surfaced of an airline employee canceling a man’s flight from New Orleans to San Francisco for recording a heated exchange over his baggage. The airline has since issued a public apology to the man, who says he was forced to pay for another ticket home on a different carrier. Fremont, California resident Navang Oza posted a video of the altercation at Louis Armstrong International Airport to his Facebook page shortly after it occurred Saturday. In the 13-minute video — which had been viewed more than 30,000 times by Thursday — Oza can be heard arguing with an airline employee who cancels his flight seconds after he begins recording. The argument allegedly began over the charges for his oversized bag, which Oza says in the video’s caption were going to to be more than $300 even though it only cost him $125 on his initial flight. “You do not have my permission to videotape,” the woman says before adding, “What's his name? Cancel the reservation.” When Oza proceeds to ask why his reservation is being canceled, the woman turns to another agent and says, “I need you to a) call the cops because this will be confiscated or b) cancel the reservation.” The woman then proceeds to begin recording Oza, asking him if he would like to pay for his oversized bag. Oza replies that he would like to speak to her manager. Read: Woman Forced To Pee In Cup During United Airlines Flight, Was Humiliated By Attendant Holding up her phone toward Oza, the agent can be heard saying, “Customer is willing to pay, however, he refuses to stop taping. This is insubordination. This is what we have to go through as agents.” Oza is later approached by a Jefferson Parish Sheriff's deputy, who asks Oza if he has been drinking. Oza replies, “Obviously,” but wrote in the video’s caption that “they said I was drunk when I only had 2 beers before getting to the airport.” When asking the deputy if he can continue recording, the officer tells him that he can indeed continue taping, as the airport is a public space. The deputy noted that Oza smelled like alcohol and told him he could either leave the terminal “peacefully” or be arrested for public intoxication. “I personally feel like I did nothing wrong and was kicked out only because I started recording the lady as she was being rude and I asked to speak to the manager as to why I had to pay more than what they charged me on my flight from SFO to NOLA,” he wrote on Facebook. Oza added, “I need to share this with everyone as I really don't feel like I did anything wrong and the lady at the counter was just being rude and not willing to help me as I inquired why it was costing more than what I paid on my way from SFO to NOLA.” In a statement to International Business Times, a spokesperson for United Airlines said, “The video does not reflect the positive customer experience we strive to offer, and for that we apologize. We are reviewing this situation, including talking with Mr. Oza and our employees to better understand what happened.” According to Oza, he had to pay more than $550 to take a flight home on American Airlines. Watch news, TV and more Yahoo View, available on iOS and Android.


News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

The company continues to expect second-quarter 2017 consolidated passenger unit revenue to be up 1.0 to 3.0 percent compared to the second quarter of 2016. United Airlines and United Express operate approximately 4,500 flights a day to 337 airports across five continents. In 2016, United and United Express operated more than 1.6 million flights carrying more than 143 million customers. United is proud to have the world's most comprehensive route network, including U.S. mainland hubs in Chicago, Denver, Houston, Los Angeles, New York/Newark, San Francisco and Washington, D.C. United operates 743 mainline aircraft and the airline's United Express partners operate 478 regional aircraft. The airline is a founding member of Star Alliance, which provides service to 190 countries via 28 member airlines. For more information, visit united.com, follow @United on Twitter or connect on Facebook. The common stock of United's parent, United Continental Holdings, Inc., is traded on the NYSE under the symbol "UAL". Safe Harbor Statement under the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995: Certain statements included in this investor update are forward-looking and thus reflect our current expectations and beliefs with respect to certain current and future events and anticipated financial and operating performance. Such forward-looking statements are and will be subject to many risks and uncertainties relating to our operations and business environment that may cause actual results to differ materially from any future results expressed or implied in such forward-looking statements. Words such as "expects," "will," "plans," "anticipates," "indicates," "believes," "forecast," "guidance," "outlook," "goals" and similar expressions are intended to identify forward-looking statements. Additionally, forward-looking statements include statements that do not relate solely to historical facts, such as statements which identify uncertainties or trends, discuss the possible future effects of current known trends or uncertainties or which indicate that the future effects of known trends or uncertainties cannot be predicted, guaranteed or assured. All forward-looking statements in this investor update are based upon information available to us on the date of this investor update. We undertake no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statement, whether as a result of new information, future events, changed circumstances or otherwise, except as required by applicable law. Our actual results could differ materially from these forward-looking statements due to numerous factors including, without limitation, the following: our ability to comply with the terms of our various financing arrangements; the costs and availability of financing; our ability to maintain adequate liquidity; our ability to execute our operational plans and revenue-generating initiatives, including optimizing our revenue; our ability to control our costs, including realizing benefits from our resource optimization efforts, cost reduction initiatives and fleet replacement programs; costs associated with any modification or termination of our aircraft orders; our ability to utilize our net operating losses; our ability to attract and retain customers; potential reputational or other impact from adverse events in our operations; demand for transportation in the markets in which we operate; an outbreak of a disease that affects travel demand or travel behavior; demand for travel and the impact that global economic and political conditions have on customer travel patterns; excessive taxation and the inability to offset future taxable income; general economic conditions (including interest rates, foreign currency exchange rates, investment or credit market conditions, crude oil prices, costs of aircraft fuel and energy refining capacity in relevant markets); our ability to cost-effectively hedge against increases in the price of aircraft fuel if we decide to do so; any potential realized or unrealized gains or losses related to fuel or currency hedging programs; economic and political instability and other risks of doing business globally; the effects of any hostilities, act of war or terrorist attack; the ability of other air carriers with whom we have alliances or partnerships to provide the services contemplated by the respective arrangements with such carriers; the effects of any technology failures or cybersecurity breaches; disruptions to our regional network; the costs and availability of aviation and other insurance; industry consolidation or changes in airline alliances; the success of our investments in airlines in other parts of the world; competitive pressures on pricing and on demand; our capacity decisions and the capacity decisions of our competitors; U.S. or foreign governmental legislation, regulation and other actions (including Open Skies agreements and environmental regulations); the impact of regulatory, investigative and legal proceedings and legal compliance risks; the impact of any management changes; labor costs; our ability to maintain satisfactory labor relations and the results of any collective bargaining agreement process with our union groups; any disruptions to operations due to any potential actions by our labor groups; weather conditions; and other risks and uncertainties set forth under Part I, Item 1A., "Risk Factors," of our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2016, as well as other risks and uncertainties set forth from time to time in the reports we file with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/united-reports-april-2017-operational-performance-300453473.html


News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: www.theguardian.com

A United Airlines spokesman said on Monday the beleaguered airline had reached a satisfactory resolution with the British breeder of Simon, a giant rabbit that died after flying from the UK to Chicago. The airline declined to comment on a threat of legal action from the owners of Simon the rabbit, a group of businessmen who live in Iowa. An attorney for the owners, Guy Cook, said they were troubled that the continental giant rabbit was cremated without a necropsy, or post-mortem examination, soon after its death on 20 April. Cook said he sent a letter to United Airlines on 4 May but said he had not heard back. A United spokesman, Charles Hobart, said United reached a resolution with breeder Annette Edwards, who was United’s customer and is based in Worcestershire, England. He said she declined the airline’s offer of a necropsy. Hobart declined to comment on the letter sent by Cook. Simon had been expected to grow to become the world’s largest rabbit. The owners are seeking the costs of buying and transporting him – estimated at $2,300 – as well as compensation for lost future earnings. Speaking in front of a large video monitor displaying a photo of the dead rabbit on its side in a large crate, Cook said the group of Des Moines area businessmen who bought Simon had planned to enter Simon at the Iowa State Fair, win a prize for the biggest rabbit, then display him at later events to raise money for the fair. When he died, Simon was about 3.5ft long and weighed 20lbs. Cook said he could have grown to weigh 40lbs, likely making him larger than Simon’s father and the world’s biggest rabbit. “United has taken no action to rectify this,” Cook said. “This case is about more than one rabbit.” News of the rabbit’s death came as the airline was struggling to repair its image following the videotaped removal of a passenger from a United plane at Chicago’s O’Hare airport. Images of the passenger, who was battered as he was dragged from the plane, circulated widely on social media and prompted condemnation and threats of a lawsuit. The passenger quickly reached a settlement with United for an undisclosed sum. Last week, the airline’s chief executive said the incident had been “a mistake of epic proportions”. Earlier, the airline was criticized after two young girls weren’t allowed on a flight because they wore leggings.


News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

The airline company has been surrounded by several controversies for over the last few months. Here are five such instances after the David Dao incident. A passenger aboard a United Airlines flight claims she was forced to urinate in a cup because attendants told her she couldn't leave her seat with the "fasten seatbelt" sign turned on. The airline says it is now investigating the April incident. Kansas City resident Nicole Harper, a mother of two children, told CBS affiliate KCTV that she was humiliated in front of other passengers during the United Airlines flight from Houston to Kansas City. Harper claims she suffers from an overactive bladder and had already gotten up to use the restroom when the plane hit turbulence and a flight attendant told her she had to return to her seat. When Harper, who was traveling with her family, explained that the situation was an emergency and that she needed to urinate, the flight attendant allegedly handed Harper a plastic cup. Her husband reportedly helped her fill two cups with urine before an airline official demanded she empty the cups in the lavatory, threatened her and shamed her in front of the flight’s other passengers. “It's a little embarrassing to come forward,” she told KCTV. Harper said the incident occurred during drink service approximately 30 minutes into the flight. In a statement to International Business Times, the airline said it happened during descent. Other passengers had gotten up from their seats, Harper claims, and she was ready for her turn to use the restroom when the attendant “told me very rudely it was not allowed to get out of my seat.” “Well, I'm going to need a cup then,” Harper reportedly told the attendant. Harper told KCTV that she was wearing a dress that allowed her to squat over the seat and use a cup. Her husband helped her fill two. Harper says the incident was humiliating. Read: United CEO Responds To David Dao Incident As New Video Surfaces “I was thinking I was on candid camera or being punked at this point,” she told KCTV. She said that after the attendant made her stand up and empty the cups, the individual told Harper they would report her, that she’d have to speak to the pilot upon landing and that the seat would have to be cleaned by a biohazard team. “Customer safety is always our first priority,” United Airlines told IBT in a statement. “Initial reports from the Mesa Airlines flight attendants indicate that Ms. Harper attempted to visit the lavatory on descent and was instructed to remain seated with the seat belt fastened per FAA regulations. At no point during the flight did flight attendants suggest that Ms. Harper use cups instead of the lavatory. We have reached out to Ms. Harper to better understand what occurred and we continue to review what happened.” This most recent incident occurred on the heels of the controversial incident involving Dr. David Dao, who was injured and bloodied after being pulled off an overbooked United flight. Cellphone video of Dao dragged off the overbooked flight went viral and the carrier later made a public apology. Dao and United Airlines reached an “amicable settlement” April 27 for an undisclosed amount. For more news videos visit Yahoo View, available now on iOS and Android.

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