Unite de Rhumatologie

Hôpital-Camfrout, France

Unite de Rhumatologie

Hôpital-Camfrout, France
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Pham T.,Marseille University Hospital Center | Claudepierre P.,Service de Rhumatologie | Constantin A.,Toulouse University Hospital Center | de Bandt M.,Unite de Rhumatologie | And 16 more authors.
Joint Bone Spine | Year: 2010

Objectives: :. To develop fact sheets about tocilizumab, in order to assist physicians in the management of patients with inflammatory joint disease. Methods: :1.selection by a committee of rheumatology experts of the main topics of interest for which fact sheets were desirable;2.identification and review of publications relevant to each topic;3.development of fact sheets based on three levels of evidence: evidencebased medicine, official recommendations, and expert opinion. The 20 experts were rheumatologists and invited specialists in other fields, and they had extensive experience with the management of RA. They were members of the CRI (Club Rhumatismes et Inflammation), a section of the Société Francaise de Rhumatologie. Each fact sheet was revised by several experts and the overall process was coordinated by three experts. Results: :. Several topics of major interest were selected: contraindications of tocilizumab; the management of adverse effects and concomitant diseases that may develop during tocilizumab therapy; and the management of everyday situations such as pregnancy, surgery, and immunizations. After a review of the literature and discussions among experts, a consensus was developed about the content of the fact sheets presented here. These fact sheets focus on several points:1.in RA, initiation and monitoring of tocilizumab therapy, management of patients with specific past histories, and specific clinical situations such as pregnancy;2.diseases other than RA, such as juvenile idiopathic arthritis;3.models of letters for informing the rheumatologist and general practitioner;4.and patient information. Conclusion: :. These tocilizumab fact sheets built on evidence-based medicine and expert opinion will serve as a practical tool for assisting physicians who manage patients on tocilizumab therapy. They will be available continuously at www.cri-net.com and updated at appropriate intervals. © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.


Fardellone P.,Service de Rhumatologie | Fardellone P.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | Sejourne A.,Service de Rhumatologie | Sejourne A.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | And 3 more authors.
Joint Bone Spine | Year: 2016

Cow's milk is often severely criticized as a cause of multiple health problems, including an increased risk of fractures. A close look at the scientific literature shows a striking contradiction. On the one hand, experimental studies of surrogate markers (e.g., bone turnover markers and bone mineral density [BMD]) usually indicate benefits from drinking cow's milk. On the other, the findings from epidemiological studies are conflicting and disconcerting. In all age groups, including children and postmenopausal women, consuming cow's milk, powdered milk supplements, or whey protein is associated with a slower bone turnover and unchanged or higher BMD values. These benefits are particularly marked in populations where calcium deficiency is prevalent, for instance in Asian countries. No interventional studies have addressed the fracture risk potentially associated with drinking cow's milk. The only available data come from epidemiological observational studies, whose results are conflicting, with a lower fracture risk in some cases and no difference or a higher risk in others. Several hypotheses have been offered to explain these findings, such as a deleterious effect of D-galactose, lactose intolerance, and acid overload. Epidemiological studies face many obstacles when seeking to detect effects of a single food, particularly the multiplicity of interactions among foods. Furthermore, reliable dietary intake data must be collected over prolonged periods, often long before the occurrence of a fracture, and defective recall may therefore introduce a major yet often unrecognized bias, particularly in populations where calcium deficiency is uncommon. To date, there is no conclusive evidence that we should modify our currently high level of consumption of cow's milk. © 2016 Société française de rhumatologie.


PubMed | Montpellier University Hospital Center, Center dEvaluation des Maladies Osseuses, Unite de Rhumatologie, French Institute of Health and Medical Research and Lille University Hospital Center
Type: | Journal: Joint, bone, spine : revue du rhumatisme | Year: 2016

Cows milk is often severely criticized as a cause of multiple health problems, including an increased risk of fractures. A close look at the scientific literature shows a striking contradiction. On the one hand, experimental studies of surrogate markers (e.g., bone turnover markers and bone mineral density [BMD]) usually indicate benefits from drinking cows milk. On the other, the findings from epidemiological studies are conflicting and disconcerting. In all age groups, including children and postmenopausal women, consuming cows milk, powdered milk supplements, or whey protein is associated with a slower bone turnover and unchanged or higher BMD values. These benefits are particularly marked in populations where calcium deficiency is prevalent, for instance in Asian countries. No interventional studies have addressed the fracture risk potentially associated with drinking cows milk. The only available data come from epidemiological observational studies, whose results are conflicting, with a lower fracture risk in some cases and no difference or a higher risk in others. Several hypotheses have been offered to explain these findings, such as a deleterious effect of D-galactose, lactose intolerance, and acid overload. Epidemiological studies face many obstacles when seeking to detect effects of a single food, particularly the multiplicity of interactions among foods. Furthermore, reliable dietary intake data must be collected over prolonged periods, often long before the occurrence of a fracture, and defective recall may therefore introduce a major yet often unrecognized bias, particularly in populations where calcium deficiency is uncommon. To date, there is no conclusive evidence that we should modify our currently high level of consumption of cows milk.


Harifi G.,Unite de Rhumatologie | Ait Ouazar M.,Unite de Rhumatologie | Ouiiki I.,Unite de Rhumatologie | Beikhou A.,Unite de Rhumatologie | And 5 more authors.
Eastern Mediterranean Health Journal | Year: 2010

We studied the effect of Ramadan fasting on calcium intake in 2 groups of 500 healthy subjects from Marrakesh using the colloquial Arabic version of the Fardellone questionnaire. The first group was investigated 5 months before Ramadan and the second during Ramadan. No significant difference was observed between the 2 groups. However, comparison of the pre-Ramadan and Ramadan periods for each age group showed a significant increase in calcium intake in subjects over 60 years. During Ramadan, consumption of milk was significantly higher, while consumption of other dairy products was not different. Overall, no significant difference in calcium intake was noted between pre-Ramadan and Ramadan periods.


Gremion G.,Swiss Olympic Medical Center | Zufferey P.,Unite de Rhumatologie
Revue Medicale Suisse | Year: 2015

Tendinopathy is one of the most common diagnosis in sports. Knowledges about their etiology, the repair process to their diagnosis and their treatment have improved thanks to the development of imaging, especially ultrasound. The disorder whose etiology could be mechanical or degenerative can cause long-term disability and sometimes the end of the sport carreer. The risk of reccurence is common ; this may lead to tendon rupture whose functional effects can be significative. The management should be early : it must respect the deadlines for tendon healing and propose a gradual recovery efforts after elimination of the contributing factors involved.


Raharinjatovo L.,University of Antananarivo | Ralandison S.,Unite de rhumatologie
Medecine et Sante Tropicales | Year: 2015

Frequently ignored or neglected, poor adherence is an important cause of treatment failure and a major public health problem. We assessed the factors involved in adherence in a hospital in Madagascar. This long-term study evaluated two groups of variables: patients’ level of understanding of their disease and drug prescriptions, and the information on the prescription written by the doctor. We interviewed 93 in-patients (mean age: 50 years) and found that 16% were illiterate. Overall, 27% did not know the name of their illness, 34% were unaware of the treatment objectives, and 14% did not understand the drug prescription. On 20% of the prescriptions, the patients’ name was not included, and the daily dose information and schedule was omitted from 16%. A day after receiving the prescription, only 64% had purchased the medication and only 53% of all patients had taken any. A correlation was observed between illiteracy, knowledge of the disease/ treatment goals, and non-purchase of drugs. The poor quality of information contained in the prescriptions and patients’ poor understanding of what they were supposed to do are obvious. Using pre-completed health forms and text messages might improve adherence. © 2015, John Libbey Eurotext. All rights reserved.


Raonivelo A.M.,Unite de rhumatologie | Ralandison D.S.,Unite de rhumatologie | Raonivelo M.T.,Unite de rhumatologie | Rapelanoro F.,Unite de rhumatologie
Douleurs | Year: 2014

Introduction: Our goal was to identify among the pain scales existing, the most effective, simple, reproducible, and comprehensible with all the socio-economic layers of Malagasy people. Patients and methods: This was a prospective study in the form of survey of patients with joint disease seen in the unique service of rheumatology in Madagascar. We evaluated seven self-assessment scales. The relevance of a scale was designated by its quality be better understood, the easier and quicker to respond, as well as the preferred physicians. Results: We investigated 100patients. The mean age was 53. years and the sex ratio 0.58. The Faces pain scale was better understood by 50%, followed by the Verbal Rating Scale. Compared to the ease of filling, the Verbal Rating Scale was in first position at 41.5% of the patients, follow-up of the Numerical rating Scale (38.6%). In multivariate analysis, the Verbal Rating scale was being most relevant for patients, followed by the Faces Pain scale. Side physicians, 70% believed that the Verbal Scale Simple was the easiest and quickest to implement. Discussions: Despite the great diversity in socio-economic and educational levels of the population, the Verbal Rating Scale related to different Malagasy society. She was the most relevant whatever age, educational level, occupation and dwelling place of the patients. Conclusion: The Verbal Rating Scale would be adapted to the Malagasy people in musculoskeletal pain autoevaluation. The result of those analyses could be used as models for many sub-Saharan countries, which have the appreciably same socio-economic contexts as ours. © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS.


PubMed | Unite de Rhumatologie
Type: Comparative Study | Journal: Eastern Mediterranean health journal = La revue de sante de la Mediterranee orientale = al-Majallah al-sihhiyah li-sharq al-mutawassit | Year: 2010

We studied the effect of Ramadan fasting on calcium intake in 2 groups of 500 healthy subjects from Marrakesh using the colloquial Arabic version of the Fardellone questionnaire. The first group was investigated 5 months before Ramadan and the second during Ramadan. No significant difference was observed between the 2 groups. However, comparison of the pre-Ramadan and Ramadan periods for each age group showed a significant increase in calcium intake in subjects over 60 years. During Ramadan, consumption of milk was significantly higher, while consumption of other dairy products was not different. Overall, no significant difference in calcium intake was noted between pre-Ramadan and Ramadan periods.


PubMed | University of Antananarivo and Unite de rhumatologie
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Medecine et sante tropicales | Year: 2015

Frequently ignored or neglected, poor adherence is an important cause of treatment failure and a major public health problem. We assessed the factors involved in adherence in a hospital in Madagascar. This long-term study evaluated two groups of variables: patients level of understanding of their disease and drug prescriptions, and the information on the prescription written by the doctor. We interviewed 93 in-patients (mean age: 50 years) and found that 16% were illiterate. Overall, 27% did not know the name of their illness, 34% were unaware of the treatment objectives, and 14% did not understand the drug prescription. On 20% of the prescriptions, the patients name was not included, and the daily dose information and schedule was omitted from 16%. A day after receiving the prescription, only 64% had purchased the medication and only 53% of all patients had taken any. A correlation was observed between illiteracy, knowledge of the disease/treatment goals, and non-purchase of drugs. The poor quality of information contained in the prescriptions and patients poor understanding of what they were supposed to do are obvious. Using pre-completed health forms and text messages might improve adherence.

Loading Unite de Rhumatologie collaborators
Loading Unite de Rhumatologie collaborators