Reggio Calabria, Italy
Reggio Calabria, Italy

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Priolo M.,Unita Operativa di Genetica Medica | Micale L.,IRCCS Casa Sollievo Della Sofferenza Hospital | Augello B.,IRCCS Casa Sollievo Della Sofferenza Hospital | Fusco C.,IRCCS Casa Sollievo Della Sofferenza Hospital | And 9 more authors.
Molecular Genetics and Metabolism | Year: 2012

Kabuki syndrome is a rare, multiple congenital anomaly/mental retardation syndrome caused by MLL2 point mutations and KDM6A microdeletions. We screened a large cohort of MLL2 mutation-negative patients for MLL2 and KDM6A exon(s) microdeletion and microduplication. Our assays failed to detect such rearrangements in MLL2 as well as in KDM6A gene. These results show that these genomic events are extremely rare in the Kabuki syndrome, substantiating its genetic heterogeneity and the search for additional causative gene(s). © 2012 Elsevier Inc.


Cirstea I.C.,Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf | Kutsche K.,Universitatsklinikum Hamburg Eppendorf | Dvorsky R.,Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf | Gremer L.,Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf | And 34 more authors.
Nature Genetics | Year: 2010

Noonan syndrome, a developmental disorder characterized by congenital heart defects, reduced growth, facial dysmorphism and variable cognitive deficits, is caused by constitutional dysregulation of the RAS-MAPK signaling pathway. Here we report that germline NRAS mutations conferring enhanced stimulus-dependent MAPK activation account for some cases of this disorder. These findings provide evidence for an obligate dependency on proper NRAS function in human development and growth. © 2010 Nature America, Inc. All rights reserved.


Della Monica M.,Unita Operativa di Genetica Medica | Galzerano D.,Unita Operativa di Cardiologia | Di Michele S.,University of Rome La Sapienza | Acquaviva F.,Unita Operativa di Genetica Medica | And 6 more authors.
American Journal of Medical Genetics, Part A | Year: 2013

During the 18th century in Naples, Raimondo di Sangro, Prince of Sansevero, completed works on the family chapel, the so-called "Cappella Sansevero." The chapel houses statues of extraordinary beauty and spectacularly detailed but also, in the basement, two human skeletons known as the "Anatomical Machines" ("Macchine Anatomiche"). These two skeletons, a man and a pregnant woman, are entirely surrounded by their circulatory systems, just as if these were suddenly fixed. Legend, believed as truth until few years ago, says that Prince Raimondo had prepared and injected an unknown embalming substance in the blood vessels of two of his servants convicting them to eternal fixity. Recent investigations have demonstrated that, while the bones are authentic, the blood vessels are actually extraordinary artifacts that also reproduce some congenital malformations. The dreadful aspect of these two skeletons appears to be in strident contrast with the classic beauty of the statues which glorify and celebrate the ideal of morphology. Conversely, the two Anatomical Machines, protagonists of legends and superstitions since centuries, represent a marvelous example of science mixed with art. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Ritelli M.,University of Brescia | Chiarelli N.,University of Brescia | Dordoni C.,University of Brescia | Reffo E.,University of Padua | And 9 more authors.
BMC Medical Genetics | Year: 2014

Background: Arterial Tortuosity Syndrome (ATS) is a very rare autosomal recessive connective tissue disorder (CTD) characterized by tortuosity and elongation of the large- and medium-sized arteries and a propensity for aneurysm formation and vascular dissection. During infancy, children frequently present the involvement of the pulmonary arteries (elongation, tortuosity, stenosis) with dyspnea and cyanosis. Other CTD signs of ATS are dysmorphisms, abdominal hernias, joint hypermobility, skeletal abnormalities, and keratoconus. ATS is typically described as a severe disease with high rate of mortality due to major cardiovascular malformations. ATS is caused by mutations in the SLC2A10 gene, which encodes the facilitative glucose transporter 10 (GLUT10). Approximately 100 ATS patients have been described, and 21 causal mutations have been identified in the SLC2A10 gene. Case presentation: We describe the clinical findings and molecular characterization of three new ATS families, which provide insight into the clinical phenotype of the disorder; furthermore, we expand the allelic repertoire of SLC2A10 by identifying two novel mutations. We also review the ATS patients characterized by our group and compare their clinical findings with previous data. Conclusions: Our data confirm that the cardiovascular prognosis in ATS is less severe than previously reported and that the first years of life are the most critical for possible life-threatening events. Molecular diagnosis is mandatory to distinguish ATS from other CTDs and to define targeted clinical follow-up and timely cardiovascular surgical or interventional treatment, when needed. © 2014 Ritelli et al.


PubMed | University of Padua, The Second University of Naples, Unita Operativa di Genetica Medica and University of Brescia
Type: | Journal: BMC medical genetics | Year: 2015

Arterial Tortuosity Syndrome (ATS) is a very rare autosomal recessive connective tissue disorder (CTD) characterized by tortuosity and elongation of the large- and medium-sized arteries and a propensity for aneurysm formation and vascular dissection. During infancy, children frequently present the involvement of the pulmonary arteries (elongation, tortuosity, stenosis) with dyspnea and cyanosis. Other CTD signs of ATS are dysmorphisms, abdominal hernias, joint hypermobility, skeletal abnormalities, and keratoconus. ATS is typically described as a severe disease with high rate of mortality due to major cardiovascular malformations. ATS is caused by mutations in the SLC2A10 gene, which encodes the facilitative glucose transporter 10 (GLUT10). Approximately 100 ATS patients have been described, and 21 causal mutations have been identified in the SLC2A10 gene.We describe the clinical findings and molecular characterization of three new ATS families, which provide insight into the clinical phenotype of the disorder; furthermore, we expand the allelic repertoire of SLC2A10 by identifying two novel mutations. We also review the ATS patients characterized by our group and compare their clinical findings with previous data.Our data confirm that the cardiovascular prognosis in ATS is less severe than previously reported and that the first years of life are the most critical for possible life-threatening events. Molecular diagnosis is mandatory to distinguish ATS from other CTDs and to define targeted clinical follow-up and timely cardiovascular surgical or interventional treatment, when needed.


Priolo M.,Unita Operativa di Genetica medica | Grosso E.,SCDU Genetica Medica | Mammi C.,Unita Operativa di Genetica medica | Labate C.,Unita Operativa di Genetica medica | And 4 more authors.
Gene | Year: 2012

The Nuclear Factor I-X (NFIX) is a member of the nuclear factor I (NFI) family proteins, which are implicated as site-specific DNA-binding proteins and is deleted or mutated in a subset of patients with Sotos-like overgrowth syndrome and in patients with Marshall-Smith syndrome. We evaluated an additional patient with clinical features of Sotos-like syndrome by sequencing analysis of the NFIX gene and identified a 21 nucleotide in frame deletion predicting loss of 7 amino acids in the DNA-binding/dimerization domain of the NFIX protein. The deleted residues are all evolutionally conserved amino acids. The present report further confirms that mutations in DNA-binding/dimerization domain cause haploinsufficiency of the NFIX protein and strongly suggests that in individuals with Sotos-like features unrelated to NSD1 changes genetic testing of NFIX should be considered. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.


Montagnani M.,University of Bologna | Cazzato S.,Unita Operativa di Pediatria | Mutignani M.,Endoscopia Digestiva ed Interventistica | Cevenini M.,University of Bologna | And 8 more authors.
Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology | Year: 2013

Mutations in the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) have been reported to increase the risk of recurrent acute pancreatitis in patients with pancreas divisum. We assessed the CFTR gene in a young male patient with pancreas divisum and recurrent acute pancreatitis. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and computed tomography revealed that the patient had pancreas divisum, with an enlarged and tortuous pancreatic duct; he also had positive results from the cystic fibrosis sweat test. Genetic analysis did not identify any common CFTR mutations, but did show that he was homozygous for the 5T allele in intron 8 IVS8 5T-12TG (which affects splicing at intron 8). Endoscopic sphincterotomy and stenting of papilla minor was performed. The IVS8 5T-12TG variant has been associated with abnormal organ development, therefore it is possible that CFTR has an important role in the development of the pancreatic duct. We propose this patient has recurrent acute pancreatitis resulting from a developmental defect associated with a suboptimal CFTR function. © 2013 AGA Institute.

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