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Minones J.,University of Santiago de Compostela | Munoz M.,University of Barcelona | Minones Trillo J.,University of Santiago de Compostela | Haro I.,Unit of Synthesis and Biomedical Applications of Peptides IQAC CSIC | And 2 more authors.
Langmuir | Year: 2015

Mixed monolayers of E2(279-298), a synthetic peptide belonging to the structural protein E2 of the GB virus C (GBV-C), formerly know as hepatitis G virus (HGV), and the phospholipids dipalmitoylphosphatidyl choline (DPPC) and dimiristoylphosphatidyl choline (DMPC),which differ in acyl chains length, were obtained at the A/W interface (monolayers of extension) in order to provide new insights on E2/phospholipids interaction. Analysis of the surface pressure-area isotherms, Brewster angle microscopy images, relative thickness, and mean areas per molecule has allowed us to establish the conditions under which the mixed components of the monolayer are miscible or immiscible and know how the level of the E2/phospholipid interaction varies with the composition of the mixed films, the surface pressure, and the hydrocarbon chains length of the phospholipids. The steric hindrance caused by the penetration of the polymer strands into the more or less ordered hydrocarbon chains of the phospholipids was suggested to explain the differences in the peptide interaction with the phospholipids studied. Therefore, the novelty of results obtained with the Langmuir film balance technique, supplemented with BAM images allow us to achieve a deeper understanding of the interaction. © 2015 American Chemical Society. Source


Gomara M.J.,Unit of Synthesis and Biomedical Applications of Peptides IQAC CSIC | Fernandez L.,Unit of Synthesis and Biomedical Applications of Peptides IQAC CSIC | Perez T.,Unit of Synthesis and Biomedical Applications of Peptides IQAC CSIC | Tenckhoff S.,University of Leipzig | And 4 more authors.
Chemical Biology and Drug Design | Year: 2011

The beneficial effect of co-infection by GB virus C (GBV-C) in the course of the disease in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients has been described, although its mechanism of action is yet to be determined. The role of anti-GBV-C antibodies in HIV-infected patients also remains unknown. At present, there are no commercial systems to detect specific markers of GBV-C infection. The research presented follows our previous work from which we obtained chimeric molecules formed by two domains of different GBV-C proteins with good sensitivity/specificity balances in the detection of anti-GBV-C antibodies in hemodialyzed and chronic hepatitis patient samples. It has been investigated the ability of the synthetic peptides to recognize specific anti-GBV-C antibodies in HIV and HCV/HIV co-infected patients by a peptide-based ELISA immunoassay. The results showed that human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients have a significantly higher frequency of anti-GBV-C antibodies than healthy controls. A comparison between HCV +/HIV + and HCV -/HIV + was analyzed. Although a higher percentage of HCV/HIV-positive sera were positive for antibodies against GBV-C peptides, the difference was not significant. The presence of anti-GBV-C antibodies could represent a good marker of exposure to GBV-C in HIV-infected patients to facilitate a further analysis of the effect of this exposure in the progression of illness caused by HIV infection. The presence of antibodies against chimeric peptides formed by two domains of different GBV-C proteins could represent a good marker of exposure to GBV-C in HIV patients. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Source


Herrera E.,Unit of Synthesis and Biomedical Applications of Peptides IQAC CSIC | Tenckhoff S.,University of Leipzig | Gomara M.J.,Unit of Synthesis and Biomedical Applications of Peptides IQAC CSIC | Galatola R.,Unit of Synthesis and Biomedical Applications of Peptides IQAC CSIC | And 8 more authors.
Journal of Medicinal Chemistry | Year: 2010

The use of synthetic peptides as HIV-1 inhibitors has been subject to research over recent years. Although the initial therapeutic attempts focused on HIV-coded enzymes, structural HIV proteins and, more specifically, the mechanisms that the virus uses to infect and replicate are now also considered therapeutic targets. The interest for viral fusion and entry inhibitors is growing significantly, given that they are applicable in combined therapies or when resistance to other antiretroviral drugs is seen and that they act before the virus enters the cell. The 124 synthetic sequences of the GBV-C E2 envelope protein have been obtained by SPPS. The interaction of certain GBV-C peptide sequences with the HIV-1 fusion peptide has been proven through the use of biophysical techniques. We also show how GBV-C E2 domains notably decrease cellular membrane fusion and interfere with the HIV-1 infectivity in a dose-dependent manner, highlighting their potential utility in future anti-HIV-1 therapies. © 2010 American Chemical Society. Source


Gomara M.J.,Unit of Synthesis and Biomedical Applications of Peptides IQAC CSIC | Fernandez L.,Unit of Synthesis and Biomedical Applications of Peptides IQAC CSIC | Perez T.,Unit of Synthesis and Biomedical Applications of Peptides IQAC CSIC | Ercilla G.,Immunology Service | Haro I.,Unit of Synthesis and Biomedical Applications of Peptides IQAC CSIC
Analytical Biochemistry | Year: 2010

The use of synthetic peptides of both structural and nonstructural proteins of GB virus C (GBV-C) has been studied for the development of new systems to diagnose infection caused by this virus. In an attempt to increase the antigenicity of linear peptide sequences, chimeric multiple antigenic peptides (MAPs) containing epitopes from E2, NS4, and NS5 GBV-C proteins have been synthesized. The synthetic constructs were evaluated by ELISA to establish whether the epitopes in chimeric branched peptides are more efficiently recognized by the specific antibodies compared to the monomeric linear sequences. Moreover, we have investigated the application of a commercial biosensor instrument for the detection of antibodies against the GBV-C in human serum samples. The results of the immunoassays reported in this work highlight the usefulness of synthetic tetrameric branched peptides containing sequences from envelope and nonstructural GBV-C proteins for the diagnosis of GBV-C infection. The potential clinical value of the MAP4(E2-NS5a) for the serodiagnosis of GBV-C infection was demonstrated, thus providing the basis for performing prevalence studies of the infection among the hemodialyzed and hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected population. © 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Source

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