Unit of Respiratory Medicine

Sant'Ambrogio di Torino, Italy

Unit of Respiratory Medicine

Sant'Ambrogio di Torino, Italy
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Verlato G.,University of Verona | Bortolami O.,University of Verona | Accordini S.,University of Verona | Olivieri M.,University of Verona | And 6 more authors.
Journal of Adolescent Health | Year: 2011

Background: The association between smoking habits and asthma is complex because subjects with asthma could avoid smoking, whereas smoking could increase asthma severity or incidence. Purpose: The relation between asthma in childhood (0-10 years) and smoking initiation in the second decade (11-20 years) was investigated using the database of the Italian Study on Asthma in Young Adults, performed in 1998-2000 on people aged 20-45 years. Methods: The cumulative incidence of smoking initiation was compared among (1) subjects not reporting asthma attacks in the first 20 years of life (n = 17,384), (2) subjects reporting asthma onset in the first decade and no disease remission by the age of 20 years (n = 305), (3) subjects reporting asthma onset in the first decade and remission in the first and second decades (n = 573). Results: Among men, the cumulative incidence of smoking onset was higher among nonasthmatics (49%) than among asthmatics (35.6%), and intermediate among asthmatics with disease remission (44.2%) (p = .001). These differences were larger in males born between 1953 and 1965, and tended to decrease in males born between 1966 and 1979: cumulative incidence of smoking onset decreased from 54.3% to 43.8% in nonasthmatics, whereas it remained stable in asthmatics (from 36.8% to 35%). Women, instead, had similar cumulative incidence of smoking initiation, irrespective of asthma onset or remission (p = .849). Conclusion: Asthma in childhood reduces smoking initiation during the subsequent teenage in men, but not in women. This protective effect tends to fade when asthma remission occurs. In the last decades, smoking initiation has decreased among nonasthmatic males, but not among asthmatic males. © 2011 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine.


de Marco R.,University of Verona | Pesce G.,University of Verona | Marcon A.,University of Verona | Accordini S.,University of Verona | And 10 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2013

Background:The joint distribution of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has not been well described. This study aims at determining the prevalence of self-reported physician diagnoses of asthma, COPD and of the asthma-COPD overlap syndrome and to assess whether these conditions share a common set of risk factors.Methods:A screening questionnaire on respiratory symptoms, diagnoses and risk factors was administered by mail or phone to random samples of the general Italian population aged 20-44 (n = 5163) 45-64 (n = 2167) and 65-84 (n = 1030) in the frame of the multicentre Gene Environment Interactions in Respiratory Diseases (GEIRD) study.Results:A physician diagnosis of asthma or COPD (emphysema/chronic bronchitis/COPD) was reported by 13% and 21% of subjects aged <65 and 65-84 years respectively. Aging was associated with a marked decrease in the prevalence of diagnosed asthma (from 8.2% to 1.6%) and with a marked increase in the prevalence of diagnosed COPD (from 3.3% to 13.3%). The prevalence of the overlap of asthma and COPD was 1.6% (1.3%-2.0%), 2.1% (1.5%-2.8%) and 4.5% (3.2%-5.9%) in the 20-44, 45-64 and 65-84 age groups. Subjects with both asthma and COPD diagnoses were more likely to have respiratory symptoms, physical impairment, and to report hospital admissions compared to asthma or COPD alone (p<0.01). Age, sex, education and smoking showed different and sometimes opposite associations with the three conditions.Conclusion:Asthma and COPD are common in the general population, and they coexist in a substantial proportion of subjects. The asthma-COPD overlap syndrome represents an important clinical phenotype that deserves more medical attention and further research. © 2013 de Marco et al.


Pesce G.,University of Verona | Locatelli F.,University of Verona | Cerveri I.,University of Pavia | Bugiani M.,Unit of Respiratory Medicine | And 6 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2015

Background: It is well known that asthma prevalence has been increasing all over the world in the last decades. However, few data are available on temporal trends of incidence and remission of asthma. Objective: To evaluate the rates of asthma incidence and remission in Italy from 1940 to 2010. Methods: The subjects were randomly sampled from the general Italian population between 1991 and 2010 in the three population-based multicentre studies: ECRHS, ISAYA, and GEIRD. Individual information on the history of asthma (age at onset, age at the last attack, use of drugs for asthma control, co-presence of hay-fever) was collected on 35,495 subjects aged 20-84 and born between 1925-1989. Temporal changes in rates of asthma incidence and remission in relation to age, birth cohort and calendar period (APC) were modelled using Poisson regression and APC models. Results: The average yearly rate of asthma incidence was 2.6/1000 (3,297 new cases among 1,263,885 person-years). The incidence rates have been linearly increasing, with a percentage increase of +3.9% (95%CI: 3.1-4.5), from 1940 up to the year 1995, when the rates begun to level off. The stabilization of asthma incidence was mainly due to a decrease in the rates of atopic asthma after 1995, while non-atopic asthma has continued to increase. The overall rate of remission was 43.2/1000person-years, and it did not vary significantly across generations, but was associated with atopy, age at asthma onset and duration of the disease. Conclusions: After 50 years of a continuous upward trend, the rates of asthma incidence underwent a substantial stabilization in the late 90s. Despite remarkable improvements in the treatment of asthma, the rate of remission did not change significantly in the last seventy years. Some caveats are required in interpreting our results, given that our estimates are based on selfreported events that could be affected by the recall bias. © 2015 Pesce et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.


PubMed | University of Verona, University of Sassari, University of Pavia, University of Bergen and Unit of Respiratory Medicine
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2015

It is well known that asthma prevalence has been increasing all over the world in the last decades. However, few data are available on temporal trends of incidence and remission of asthma.To evaluate the rates of asthma incidence and remission in Italy from 1940 to 2010.The subjects were randomly sampled from the general Italian population between 1991 and 2010 in the three population-based multicentre studies: ECRHS, ISAYA, and GEIRD. Individual information on the history of asthma (age at onset, age at the last attack, use of drugs for asthma control, co-presence of hay-fever) was collected on 35,495 subjects aged 20-84 and born between 1925-1989. Temporal changes in rates of asthma incidence and remission in relation to age, birth cohort and calendar period (APC) were modelled using Poisson regression and APC models.The average yearly rate of asthma incidence was 2.6/1000 (3,297 new cases among 1,263,885 person-years). The incidence rates have been linearly increasing, with a percentage increase of +3.9% (95%CI: 3.1-4.5), from 1940 up to the year 1995, when the rates begun to level off. The stabilization of asthma incidence was mainly due to a decrease in the rates of atopic asthma after 1995, while non-atopic asthma has continued to increase. The overall rate of remission was 43.2/1000person-years, and it did not vary significantly across generations, but was associated with atopy, age at asthma onset and duration of the disease.After 50 years of a continuous upward trend, the rates of asthma incidence underwent a substantial stabilization in the late 90s. Despite remarkable improvements in the treatment of asthma, the rate of remission did not change significantly in the last seventy years. Some caveats are required in interpreting our results, given that our estimates are based on self-reported events that could be affected by the recall bias.

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