Unit of Hereditary Cancers

Genova, Italy

Unit of Hereditary Cancers

Genova, Italy
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Ottini L.,University of Rome La Sapienza | Rizzolo P.,University of Rome La Sapienza | Zanna I.,Cancer Research and Prevention Institute ISPO | Silvestri V.,University of Rome La Sapienza | And 20 more authors.
Breast Cancer Research and Treatment | Year: 2014

Male breast cancer (MBC) is rare and poorly understood. Like female breast cancer (FBC), MBCs are highly sensitive to hormonal changes, and hyperestrogenism, specifically, represents a major risk factor for MBC. MBC is considered similar to late-onset, post-menopausal estrogen/progesteron receptors positive FBC (ER+/PR+). Sulfotransferase 1A1 (SULT1A1) is an enzyme involved in the metabolism of estrogens. Recently, SULT1A1 common functional polymorphism Arg213His (638G>A) variant has been found to be associated with increased breast cancer (BC) risk, particularly in post-menopausal women. For this reason, we decided to explore whether SULT1A1 Arg213His could exert an effect on MBC development. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the SULT1A1 Arg213His polymorphism on MBC risk. The secondary aim was to investigate possible associations with relevant clinical–pathologic features of MBC. A total of 394 MBC cases and 786 healthy male controls were genotyped for SULT1A1 Arg213His polymorphism by PCR–RFLP and high-resolution melting analysis. All MBC cases were characterized for relevant clinical–pathologic features. A significant difference in the distribution of SULT1A1 Arg213His genotypes was found between MBC cases and controls (P < 0.0001). The analysis of genotype-specific risk showed a significant increased MBC risk in individuals with G/A (OR 1.97, 95 % CI 1.50–2.59; P < 0.0001) and A/A (OR 3.09, 95 % CI 1.83–5.23; P < 0.0001) genotypes in comparison to wild-type genotype, under co-dominant model. A significant association between SULT1A1 risk genotypes and HER2 status emerged. Results indicate that SULT1A1 Arg213His may act as a low-penetrance risk allele for developing MBC and could be associated with a specific tumor subtype associated with HER2 overexpression. © 2014, Springer Science+Business Media New York.


Peterlongo P.,The FIRC Institute of Molecular Oncology | Peterlongo P.,Fondazione IRCCS Instituto Nazionale dei Tumori | Catucci I.,The FIRC Institute of Molecular Oncology | Catucci I.,Fondazione IRCCS Instituto Nazionale dei Tumori | And 122 more authors.
Human Molecular Genetics | Year: 2015

Numerous genetic factors that influence breast cancer risk are known. However, approximately two-thirds of the overall familial risk remain unexplained. To determine whether some of the missing heritability is due to rare variants conferring high to moderate risk, we tested for an association between the c.5791C>T nonsense mutation (p. Arg1931*; rs144567652) in exon 22 of FANCM gene and breast cancer. An analysis of genotyping data from 8635 familial breast cancer cases and 6625 controls from different countries yielded an association between the c.5791C>T mutation and breast cancer risk [odds ratio (OR) = 3.93 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.28-12.11; P = 0.017)]. Moreover, we performed two meta-analyses of studies from countries with carriers in both cases and controls and of all available data. These analyses showed breast cancer associations with OR = 3.67 (95% CI = 1.04-12.87; P = 0.043) and OR = 3.33 (95% CI = 1.09-13.62; P = 0.032), respectively. Based on information theory-based prediction, we established that the mutation caused an out-of-frame deletion of exon 22, due to the creation of a binding site for the pre-mRNA processing protein hnRNP A1. Furthermore, genetic complementation analyses showed that the mutation influenced the DNA repair activity of the FANCM protein. In summary, we provide evidence for the first time showing that the common p. Arg1931* loss-of-function variant in FANCM is a risk factor for familial breast cancer. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.


Silvestri V.,University of Rome La Sapienza | Rizzolo P.,University of Rome La Sapienza | Scarno M.,Inter University Consortium for Super Computing | Chillemi G.,Inter University Consortium for Super Computing | And 21 more authors.
European Journal of Cancer | Year: 2015

Increasing evidence indicates that common genetic variants may contribute to the heritable risk of breast cancer (BC). In this study, we investigated whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), within the 8q24.21 multi-cancer susceptibility region and within BC-associated loci widespread in the genome, may influence the risk of BC in men, and whether they may be associated with specific clinical-pathologic characteristics of male BC (MBC). In the frame of the ongoing Italian Multicenter Study on MBC, we performed a case-control study on 386 MBC cases, including 50 BRCA1/2 mutation carriers, and 1105 healthy male controls, including 197 unaffected BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. All 1491 subjects were genotyped by Sequenom iPLEX technology for a total of 29 susceptibility SNPs. By logistic regression models, we found a significant association with MBC risk for five SNPs: rs1562430 (p = 0.002) and rs445114 (p = 0.026) both within the 8q24.21 region; rs1011970/9p21.3 (p = 0.011), rs614367/11q13.3 (p = 0.016) and rs1314913/14q24.1 (p < 0.0001). Differences in the distribution of rs614367/11q13.3 genotypes according to oestrogen receptor (ER) status (p = 0.006), and of rs1011970/9p21.3 genotypes according to human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status (p = 0.002) emerged. Association of rs1011970/9p21.3 risk genotype with HER2+ MBC was confirmed by a multivariate analysis. rs1314913/14q24.1 was associated with increased MBC risk in analyses restricted to male BRCA1/2 mutation carriers (p = 0.041). In conclusion, we provided the first evidence that the 8q24.21 region is associated with MBC risk. Furthermore, we showed that the SNPs rs1562430/8q24.21 and rs1314913/14q24.1 strongly influence BC risk in men and suggested that the SNP rs1314913/14q24.1 may act as a risk modifier locus in male BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


PubMed | Fondazione IRCCS Instituto Nazionale Tumori INT, Fondazione Instituto Firc Of Oncologia Molecolare Ifom And Cogentech Cancer Genetic Test Laboratory, University of Palermo, Italian National Cancer Institute and 11 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: European journal of cancer (Oxford, England : 1990) | Year: 2015

Increasing evidence indicates that common genetic variants may contribute to the heritable risk of breast cancer (BC). In this study, we investigated whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), within the 8q24.21 multi-cancer susceptibility region and within BC-associated loci widespread in the genome, may influence the risk of BC in men, and whether they may be associated with specific clinical-pathologic characteristics of male BC (MBC). In the frame of the ongoing Italian Multicenter Study on MBC, we performed a case-control study on 386 MBC cases, including 50 BRCA1/2 mutation carriers, and 1105 healthy male controls, including 197 unaffected BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. All 1491 subjects were genotyped by Sequenom iPLEX technology for a total of 29 susceptibility SNPs. By logistic regression models, we found a significant association with MBC risk for five SNPs: rs1562430 (p=0.002) and rs445114 (p=0.026) both within the 8q24.21 region; rs1011970/9p21.3 (p=0.011), rs614367/11q13.3 (p=0.016) and rs1314913/14q24.1 (p<0.0001). Differences in the distribution of rs614367/11q13.3 genotypes according to oestrogen receptor (ER) status (p=0.006), and of rs1011970/9p21.3 genotypes according to human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status (p=0.002) emerged. Association of rs1011970/9p21.3 risk genotype with HER2+MBC was confirmed by a multivariate analysis. rs1314913/14q24.1 was associated with increased MBC risk in analyses restricted to male BRCA1/2 mutation carriers (p=0.041). In conclusion, we provided the first evidence that the 8q24.21 region is associated with MBC risk. Furthermore, we showed that the SNPs rs1562430/8q24.21 and rs1314913/14q24.1 strongly influence BC risk in men and suggested that the SNP rs1314913/14q24.1 may act as a risk modifier locus in male BRCA1/2 mutation carriers.

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