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Gondoni L.A.,Unit of Cardiac Rehabilitation Ospedale San Giuseppe | Titon A.M.,Unit of Cardiac Rehabilitation Ospedale San Giuseppe | Montano M.,Unit of Cardiac Rehabilitation Ospedale San Giuseppe | Caetani G.,Unit of Cardiac Rehabilitation Ospedale San Giuseppe | And 7 more authors.
Obesity | Year: 2011

This study aims to describe the changes that a period of low-calorie diet and physical training determines in heart rate and in corrected QT (QTc) interval in obese patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) and to verify whether it is effective in shortening the QT interval using three different methods for QT correction. Two hundred and seventy obese white patients (162 males60%) affected with stable CHD and treated with Β-blockers were retrospectively studied in the setting of a program aimed at losing weight through training (aerobic activity strength exercise) and diet (80% of estimated resting energy expenditure). Age was related to RR interval, QTc was related to left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) while sex exerted no effects. At the end of the study period heart rate decreased by 8.3% and noncorrected QT increased by 3.0%; QT corrected with the Bazett formula decreased by 0.7% (P = 0.007), QT corrected with the Fridericia formula increased by 0.5% (P = 0.023), whereas the modifications were nonsignificant when the Framingham correction was used. In conclusion, contrary to the current views, physical training and diet, which are effective in reducing heart rate, produced no clinically relevant change in the QT interval. © 2010 The Obesity Society. Source


Gondoni L.A.,Unit of Cardiac Rehabilitation Ospedale San Giuseppe | Nibbio F.,Unit of Cardiac Rehabilitation Ospedale San Giuseppe | Caetani G.,Unit of Cardiac Rehabilitation Ospedale San Giuseppe | Augello G.,Unit of Cardiac Rehabilitation Ospedale San Giuseppe | Titon A.M.,Unit of Cardiac Rehabilitation Ospedale San Giuseppe
International Journal of Cardiology | Year: 2010

We sought to describe the differences in exercise prescription in obese subjects using attained METs as compared to the subjective perception of the effort using the Borg scale ratings of perceived exertion (Borg RPE). We studied 552 obese patients who underwent an exercise stress test in the setting of a rehabilitation program. Exercise was prescribed at 70% of peak attained METS. This method was compared to an exercise level prescription that induces a subjective perception of mild fatigue (13 on the 20 points Borg scale). Attained METS were 6.2 ± 2.5 and Borg RPE was 15.2 ± 1.7. Borg RPE was negatively related to intensity and duration of exercise. Females, patient with a lower level of education and patients on diuretics perceived higher efforts. Patients who stopped exercising because of dyspnea or angina reached a lower level of METs (4.7 ± 1.7 vs 6.3 ± 2.7 METs; P < 0.001) but the perceived effort was similar (15.5 ± 1.7 vs 15.2 ± 1.7; P = 0.252). The subjective method would have yielded a significantly higher training workload: 5.4 ± 2.3 vs 4.3 ± 1.8 (P < 0.001). In conclusion, in obese patients, Borg RPE is not equivalent to attained METs in exercise prescription and it influenced by educational level. © 2008 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved. Source

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