Unidade de Nutricao e Metabolismo

Lisbon, Portugal

Unidade de Nutricao e Metabolismo

Lisbon, Portugal

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Cortez-Pinto H.,Unidade de Nutricao e Metabolismo | Gouveia M.,Catholic University of Portugal
Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research | Year: 2010

Background and Aims: The World Health Organization estimated that 3.2% of the burden of disease around the world is attributable to the consumption of alcohol. The aim of this study is to estimate the burden of disease attributable to alcohol consumption in Portugal. Methods: Burden and costs of diseases attributable to alcohol drinking were estimated based on demographic and health statistics available for 2005, using the Disability-Adjusted Life Years (DALY) lost generated by death or disability. Results: In Portugal, 3.8% of deaths are attributable to alcohol (4,059 of 107,839). After measuring the DALY generated by mortality data, the proportion of disease attributable to alcohol was 5.0%, with men having 5.6% of deaths and 6.2% of disease burden, while female figures were, respectively, 1.8 and 2.4%. Considering the sum of death and disability DALYs, liver diseases represented the main source of the burden attributable to alcohol with 31.5% of total DALYs, followed by traffic accidents (28.2%) and several types of cancer (19.2%). As for the cost of illness incurred by the health system, our results indicate that €95.1 millions are attributable to alcohol-related disease admissions (liver diseases, cancer, traffic accidents, and external causes) while the ambulatory costs of alcohol-related diseases were estimated in €95.9 million, totaling €191.0 million direct costs, representing 0.13% of Gross Domestic Product and 1.25% of total national health expenditures. An alternative analysis was carried out using higher consumption levels so as to replicate aggregate alcohol consumption statistics. In this case, DALYs lost increased by 11.7% and health costs by 23%. Conclusion: Our results confirm that alcohol is an important health risk factor in Portugal and a heavy economic burden for the health system, with hepatic diseases ranking first as a source of burden of disease attributable to alcohol. Copyright © 2010 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.


Pimenta N.M.,Polytechnic Institute of Santarém | Cortez-Pinto H.,Unidade de Nutricao e Metabolismo | Melo X.,Polytechnic Institute of Santarém | Silva-Nunes J.,Curry Cabral Hospital Lisbon Portugal | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics | Year: 2016

Background: Waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) has been reported as a preferable risk related body fat (BF) marker, although no standardised waist circumference measurement protocol (WCmp) has been proposed. The present study aimed to investigate whether the use of a different WCmp affects the strength of relationship between WHtR and both whole and central BF in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) patients. Methods: BF was assessed with dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in 28 NAFLD patients [19 males, mean (SD) 51 (13) years and nine females, 47 (13) years]. All subjects also underwent anthropometric evaluation including height and waist circumference (WC) measurement using four different WCmp (WC1, minimal waist; WC2, iliac crest; WC3, mid-distance between iliac crest and lowest rib; WC4, at the umbilicus) and WHtR was calculated using each WC measurements (WHtR1, WHtR2, WHtR3 and WHtR4, respectively). Partial correlations were conducted to assess the relation of WHtR and DXA assessed BF. Results: All WHtR were particularly correlated with central BF, including abdominal BF (r = 0.80, r = 0.84, r = 0.84 and r = 0.78, respectively, for WHtR1, WHtR2, WHtR3 and WHtR4) and central abdominal BF (r = 0.72, r = 0.77, r = 0.76 and r = 0.71, respectively, for WHtR1, WHtR2, WHtR3 and WHtR4), after controlling for age, sex and body mass index. There were no differences between the correlation coefficients obtained between all studied WHtR and each whole and central BF variable. Conclusions: Waist-to-height ratio was found a suitable BF marker in the present sample of NAFLD patients and the strength of the relationship between WHtR and both whole and central BF was not altered by using different WCmp in the present sample of NAFLD patients. © 2016 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.


Carvalhana S.,Unidade de Nutricao e Metabolismo | MacHado M.V.,Unidade de Nutricao e Metabolismo | Cortez-Pinto H.,Unidade de Nutricao e Metabolismo
Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care | Year: 2012

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the liver epidemic of our time. Diet strongly influences its development and should be a component of any treatment plan. It is crucial to standardize diet recommendations in an evidence-based manner. RECENT FINDINGS: Calorie restriction per se seems beneficial regardless of macronutrients composition. However, fat consumption, mainly cholesterol and saturated fatty acids are particularly steatogenic. There is increasing evidence that fructose, mainly consumed as soft drinks, is highly deleterious to the liver. Controversial results regarding modest alcohol consumption, suggest that although alcohol should not be advised, it should not be strictly forbidden. Recent studies suggest beneficial effects of coffee and tea in NAFLD. SUMMARY: Patients with NAFLD should have an individualized diet recommendation, in order to lose at least 7% of their weight if overweight, reducing caloric intake, mainly at cost of cholesterol and saturated fatty acids. Simple sugars should be avoided, and soft drinks discouraged. © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health.


Catarina Moreira A.,Polytechnic Institute of Coimbra | Carolino E.,Matematica. Escola Superior de Tecnologia da Saude de Lisbon | Domingos F.,Nephrocare | Gaspar A.,Nephrocare | And 2 more authors.
Nutricion Hospitalaria | Year: 2013

Background: Poor nutritional status and worse healthrelated quality of life (QoL) have been reported in haemodialysis (HD) patients. The utilization of generic and disease specific QoL questionnaires in the same population may provide a better understanding of the significance of nutrition in QoL dimensions. Objective: To assess nutritional status by easy to use parameters and to evaluate the potential relationship with QoL measured by generic and disease specific questionnaires. Methods: Nutritional status was assessed by subjective global assessment adapted to renal patients (SGA), body mass index (BMI), nutritional intake and appetite. QoL was assessed by the generic EuroQoL and disease specific Kidney Disease Quality of Life-Short Form (KDQoL-SF) questionnaires. Results: The study comprised 130 patients of both genders, mean age 62.7 ± 14.7 years. The prevalence of undernutrition ranged from 3.1% by BMI ≤ 18.5 kg/m2 to 75.4% for patients below energy and protein intake recommendations. With the exception of BMI classification, undernourished patients had worse scores in nearly all QoL dimensions (EuroQoL and KDQoL-SF), a pattern which was dominantly maintained when adjusted for demographics and disease-related variables. Overweight/ obese patients (BMI ≥ 25) also had worse scores in some QoL dimensions, but after adjustment the pattern was maintained only in the symptoms and problems dimension of KDQoL-SF (p = 0.011). Conclusion: Our study reveals that even in mildly undernourished HD patients, nutritional status has a significant impact in several QoL dimensions. The questionnaires used provided different, almost complementary perspectives, yet for daily practice EuroQoL is simpler. Assuring a good nutritional status, may positively influence QoL.


PubMed | Unidade de Nutricao e Metabolismo
Type: Comparative Study | Journal: Alcoholism, clinical and experimental research | Year: 2010

The World Health Organization estimated that 3.2% of the burden of disease around the world is attributable to the consumption of alcohol. The aim of this study is to estimate the burden of disease attributable to alcohol consumption in Portugal.Burden and costs of diseases attributable to alcohol drinking were estimated based on demographic and health statistics available for 2005, using the Disability-Adjusted Life Years (DALY) lost generated by death or disability.In Portugal, 3.8% of deaths are attributable to alcohol (4,059 of 107,839). After measuring the DALY generated by mortality data, the proportion of disease attributable to alcohol was 5.0%, with men having 5.6% of deaths and 6.2% of disease burden, while female figures were, respectively, 1.8 and 2.4%. Considering the sum of death and disability DALYs, liver diseases represented the main source of the burden attributable to alcohol with 31.5% of total DALYs, followed by traffic accidents (28.2%) and several types of cancer (19.2%). As for the cost of illness incurred by the health system, our results indicate that 95.1 millions euros are attributable to alcohol-related disease admissions (liver diseases, cancer, traffic accidents, and external causes) while the ambulatory costs of alcohol-related diseases were estimated in 95.9 million euros, totaling 191.0 million euros direct costs, representing 0.13% of Gross Domestic Product and 1.25% of total national health expenditures. An alternative analysis was carried out using higher consumption levels so as to replicate aggregate alcohol consumption statistics. In this case, DALYs lost increased by 11.7% and health costs by 23%.Our results confirm that alcohol is an important health risk factor in Portugal and a heavy economic burden for the health system, with hepatic diseases ranking first as a source of burden of disease attributable to alcohol.

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