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Der erste Platz in der Kategorie Award für innovative Forschung und Entwicklung – Nationale Institutionen wurde gemeinsam vergeben an die Universität Khalifa für einen Dual-Desinfektion-Filter mit modifiziertem Biosand, gekoppelt mit einem Solar-Pasteurisierungssystem, und das Institut Masdar an der Universität Khalifa für einen Solarentsalzungsprozess unter Verwendung eines perforierten schwarzen Stoffes unter einem Sonnenkollektor. Der erste Platz in der Kategorie Award für innovative Forschung und Entwicklung – Internationale Institutionen ging an die niederländische Organisation für angewandte wissenschaftliche Forschung (TNO) in Zusammenarbeit mit der Katar General Electricity and Water Corporation (KAHRAMAA) für eine solarbetriebene Entsalzungstechnik auf Grundlage von TNOs hocheffizientem Membrandestillationskonzept. Al Tayer stellte fest, dass Hunderte von Millionen von Kindern in Zukunft keinen Zugang zu sauberem Wasser haben werden und dass Mädchen derzeit 200 Millionen Stunden pro Tag verbringen, um Wasser zu sammeln, was ihre Bildung beeinträchtigt, so UNICEF.


One of the perceived benefits of breastfeeding is the possibility that it can boost the child's IQ. Findings of a new study, however, suggest breastfeeding kids won't necessarily make them more intelligent. In a study involving children between 3 and 5 years old, researchers found that while breastfed children generally scored higher on standardized tests for cognitive abilities, the difference was not big enough to be considered as statistically significant. "We weren't able to find a direct causal link between breastfeeding and children's cognitive outcomes," said study author Lisa-Christine Girard from University College Dublin. Why children who were breastfed may be associated with having better cognitive abilities can be attributed to other factors, the researchers said. Mothers who decide to breastfeed their babies, for example, tend to have higher levels of education and engage less in risky behaviors when they were pregnant. Breastfeeding babies is still linked to advantages for both child and mother though, so despite the study's findings, mothers are still urged to breastfeed their babies. Here are some of the other reasons why breast milk is still best for children, especially newborns. In a 2016 study, researchers found that in infants with a high risk for asthma, those who were breastfed have a 27 percent reduced risk of developing respiratory symptoms. The research showed for the first time how infants with 17q21 gene variants, which make them susceptible to wheezing, may experience a different severity and frequency of respiratory symptoms depending on whether or not they are breastfed. In a report, researchers from UNICEF and the World Health Organization said that breastfeeding can slash the occurrence of sudden infant death in developed countries by up to a third. Breastfeeding can also reduce cases of diarrhea and respiratory infections. Breastfeeding children does not just provide them protection from health conditions when they are young. Researchers have also found that breastfeeding children can reduce their risk of developing obesity and diabetes later in life. Breastfeeding offers an array of benefits for babies, but research has also shown that mothers can also benefit from breastfeeding their kids. In a study published in the journal Maternal & Child Nutrition, researchers found that breastfeeding protects mothers from serious diseases and premature death. Breastfeeding appears to reduce the risk for hypertension, diabetes, pre-menopausal ovarian cancer, heart attack, and breast cancer. Despite the benefits associated with breastfeeding, some noted that there is no need to criticize women who have decided not to breastfeed their babies. "Women should not feel bullied or emotionally blackmailed into breastfeeding by one over-zealous section of society any more than they should be made to feel ashamed for breastfeeding in public by another," wrote The Lancet Global Health editor Zoe Mullan. "Breast milk provided exclusively for at least six months is unequivocally the best nutrition a baby can receive; women and their families need respectful advice to make the choice wherever that is possible," Mullan added. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


DUBAI, Emirados Árabes Unidos--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Sua alteza, o xeique Maktoum bin Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, governador adjunto de Dubai, honrou 10 vencedores de 8 países no Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum Global Water Award, no valor de US$ 1 milhão. Sua alteza, Mansoor bin Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, também participou. O prêmio foi lançado por sua alteza, o xeique Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, vice-presidente e primeiro ministro dos EAU e governador de Dubai, para incentivar centros de pesquisa, pessoas e inovadores de todo o mundo a encontrar soluções inovadoras e sustentáveis para combater a escassez mundial de água limpa, usando energia solar. O prêmio é supervisionado pela Water Aid Foundation (Suqia) dos EAU, sob o amparo das iniciativas globais de Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum. O prêmio tem três categorias principais: projetos inovadores, pesquisa e desenvolvimento inovadores e juventude inovadora. O primeiro colocado na categoria de pesquisa e desenvolvimento inovadores – instituições internacionais foi a Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research (TNO), em cooperação com a Qatar General Electricity and Water Corporation (KAHRAMAA) por uma tecnologia de dessalinização por energia solar com base no conceito de destilação por membrana de alta eficiência da TNO. Al Tayer observou que centenas de milhões de crianças não terão acesso à água limpa no futuro, e que as meninas agora passam 200 milhões de horas por dia coletando água, o que afeta a educação, de acordo com a UNICEF. O texto no idioma original deste anúncio é a versão oficial autorizada. As traduções são fornecidas apenas como uma facilidade e devem se referir ao texto no idioma original, que é a única versão do texto que tem efeito legal.


This report gives an in-depth analysis of branded toilet cleaner market in India. Globally, toilet cleaners have become a matured category and growth in the developed world will be flat with declines in many key markets. Sales growth in the developing markets will be a more respectable one. Due to this, global manufacturers have now shifted their focus from developed countries to developing countries like India and China. The United Nations Children's Education Fund (UNICEF) states that almost 595 million people practice open defecation in India due to lack of access to proper sanitation. The practice of open defecation is not limited to rural India. It is found in urban areas too where the percentage of people who defecate in the open is 12%, while in rural settings it is about 65%. As a result, India has a very low penetration of toilet cleaners which provides an attractive opportunity for global and domestic brands. Indian consumers still use proxy products for cleaning toilets such as phenyl, detergents, acids and bleaching powders. These local cleaners, such as phenyl, have a much bigger market than branded toilet cleaners. For more information about this report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/k62vwm/india_toilet To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/india-toilet-cleaner-market-report-2017-toilet-cleaners-are-growing-with-more-than-18-cagr-over-the-past-five-years---research-and-markets-300447210.html


News Article | April 21, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

United Nations Secretary General Antonio Guterres speaks at Financing for Peace: Innovations to Tackle Fragility session during the IMF/World Bank spring meetings in Washington, U.S., April 21, 2017. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) - United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Guterres met with U.S. President Donald Trump at the White House on Friday for the first time since both took office earlier this year and amid a U.S. push to cut funding to the world body and its agencies. Guterres met with Trump's national security adviser, H.R. McMaster, and then "had an opportunity to meet with President Trump," U.N. spokesman Stephane Dujarric said. "The secretary-general and the president agreed to meet again in the near future," Dujarric told reporters at the United Nations. "In his meetings at the White House, the secretary-general felt he had had an interesting and constructive discussion on cooperation between the United States and the United Nations," he said. U.N. Security Council ambassadors are due to meet Trump in Washington on Monday, diplomats said. The United States is president of the 15-member council for April. Trump has proposed a 28 percent budget cut for diplomacy and foreign aid, which includes an unspecified reduction in financial support for the United Nations and its agencies, as well as enforcement of a 25 percent cap on U.S. funding for peacekeeping operations. The United States is the biggest contributor to the United Nations, paying 22 percent of the $5.4 billion core budget and 28.5 percent of the $7.9 billion peacekeeping budget. These are assessed contributions agreed by the U.N. General Assembly. The United States currently owes the United Nations $896 million for its core budget, U.N. officials said. The United States is also reviewing peacekeeping missions as their mandates come up for renewal in a bid to cut costs. U.N. agencies such as the U.N. Development Programme (UNDP), the children's agency UNICEF, and the U.N. Population Fund (UNFPA), are funded by governments voluntarily. The State Department said this month it was ending funding for UNFPA, the international body's agency focused on family planning as well as maternal and child health in more than 150 countries. Guterres warned that the cut could have "devastating effects" on vulnerable women and girls. In 2016, the United States was the top contributor to the UNDP's core budget, with an $83 million donation; the leading donor to UNICEF's core budget in 2015 with $132 million; and the fourth-largest donor to the UNFPA, giving $75 million in core budget and earmarked contributions.


The report calls on the Security Council and countries to take concrete steps toward preventing attacks and ending impunity, as recommended last year by the UN Secretary General. These steps include regular reporting by countries to the UN on actions taken to prevent attacks, investigating those that occur and holding perpetrators accountable. Where member states fail to act, the Secretary urged, the Security Council should initiate thorough investigations and establish accountability procedures. The Security Council and states have failed to take these actions. "Our findings cry out for a level of commitment and follow-through by the international community and individual governments that has been absent since the passage of Security Council Resolution 2286 a year ago," said Leonard S. Rubenstein, director of the Program on Human Rights, Health and Conflict at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and chair of the coalition. In Syria, Physicians for Human Rights (PHR) verified 108 attacks on health facilities, and the deaths of 91 health professionals in 2016. "The all-out assault on health facilities and professionals in Syria is the worst pattern of such attacks in modern history," said Susannah Sirkin, director of international policy at PHR. "2016 marked one of the worst years we've documented," she said. The UN Assistance Mission in Afghanistan reported 119 attacks on health facilities and personnel, up from 63 the year before. In Yemen, UNICEF verified 93 attacks on hospitals over a period from March 2015 to December 2016. The numbers noted in the report may greatly understate the extent and severity of attacks, the report says, because documentation of attacks remains spotty. "We know that in places like South Sudan and Iraq, many vicious attacks on health care have been inflicted by parties to the conflicts," said Laura Hoemeke, director of communications and advocacy at IntraHealth International. "These attacks cascade into lack of access to health care for suffering populations, but no one is collecting the number of attacks." The report reveals that while bombing and shelling of health facilities is the most obvious and devastating form of attack, violence against health care takes many forms. "In Afghanistan, we found patterns of intimidation and threats against health workers, and occupation of health facilities," said Christine Monaghan, a researcher at Watchlist on Children in Armed Conflict, which engaged in a field investigation in Afghanistan. "There were 13 recorded attacks on vaccinators, in which ten people were killed and 16 were abducted," she said. Continued obstruction of access to care is another key finding. In Ukraine, checkpoints, as well as the difficulty of crossing conflict lines, have impeded access to care for a third of households in conflict-affected areas, with dire implications for the 50 percent of families in the region suffering from chronic diseases. In Turkey, curfews prevented injured people from reaching care, resulting in needless civilian deaths. In the Occupied Palestinian Territory, the Palestinian Red Crescent Society reported 416 instances of violence or interference with its ambulances, injuring 162 emergency medical technicians. Accountability for these assaults is largely absent, the report said. A review by Human Rights Watch of 25 incidents of attacks on health care in ten countries between 2013 and 2016, resulting in the deaths of more than 230 people and the closure or destruction of six hospitals, found that either no proceedings for accountability were undertaken at all or the results of proceedings were inadequate. "Without accountability, these attacks won't stop, and efforts to investigate these kinds of incidents—and pursue justice where relevant—have been half-hearted or worse," said Diederik Lohman, director of health and human rights at Human Rights Watch. This fourth global report from the coalition relies on field investigations by coalition members as well as secondary data from UN agencies, non-governmental organizations and other sources. It can be accessed at: safeguardinghealth.org/report2017 The Safeguarding Health in Conflict Coalition consists of more than 30 organizations working to protect health workers and services threatened by war or civil unrest. The coalition raises awareness of global attacks on health and presses governments and United Nations agencies for greater global action to protect the security of health care. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/health-workers-and-facilities-in-23-conflict-ridden-countries-attacked-with-impunity-in-2016-300450139.html


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: www.nature.com

The election of a politically inexperienced president in the United States, Britain's vote to leave the European Union and the initial rejection of a peace deal in a Colombian referendum to end an armed conflict all signal dissatisfaction with the political status quo. Yet citizens have few opportunities to influence government decisions beyond the ballot box. “This is a time when almost every aspect of government can be improved,” Geoff Mulgan, chief of Nesta, a UK charity that aims to foster innovation and digital democracy1, has said. It is time to work out how, together. Last year, my students at the Governance Lab at New York University designed a process to help four governments — the city government of Rio de Janeiro in Brazil and the national governments of Argentina, Colombia and Panama — to obtain expert advice about the global Zika outbreak. Our project, called Smarter Crowdsourcing, broke down the outbreak into actionable problems, such as the accumulation of standing water leading to the breeding of more infected mosquitoes. Then we organized 6 online dialogues with 100 experts from 6 continents to gather knowledge, experiences and advice. Three months on, these governments are beginning to implement what they learned. For example, Rio and Argentina have started social media 'listening' initiatives to learn how the public perceives the disease. Listening and crowdsourcing approaches can make governments more agile in responding to problems. Whether the issue is public health, global warming or prison reform, governments struggle to identify and implement new approaches quickly. When car pioneer Henry Ford wanted to innovate, he shut down and retooled his factories. Governments do not have that luxury. Technology is already changing the way public institutions make decisions. Governments at every level are using 'big data' to pinpoint or predict the incidence of crime, heart attack and foodborne illness. Expert networking platforms — online directories of people and their skills, such as NovaGob.org in Spain — are helping to match civil servants who have the relevant expertise with those who need the know-how. To get beyond conventional democratic models of representation or referendum, and, above all, to improve learning in the civil service, we must build on these pockets of promise and evolve. That requires knowledge of what works and when. But there is a dearth of research on the impact of technology on public institutions. One reason is a lack of suitable research methods. Many academics prefer virtual labs with simulated conditions that are far from realistic. Field experiments have long been used to evaluate the choice between two policies. But much less attention is paid to how public organizations might operate differently with new technologies. The perfect must not be the enemy of the good. Even when it is impractical to create a control group and run parallel interventions in the same institution, comparisons can yield insights. For instance, one could compare the effect of using citizen commenting on legislative proposals in the Brazilian parliament with similar practices in the Finnish parliament. Of course, some leaders have little interest in advancing more than their own power. But many more politicians and public servants are keen to use research-based evidence to guide how they use technology to govern in the public interest. The MacArthur Foundation in Chicago, Illinois, has started funding a research network — a dozen academics and public servants — to study the possibilities of using new technology to govern more transparently and in partnership with citizens (see www.opening-governance.org). More collaboration among universities and across disciplines is needed. New research platforms — such as the Open Governance Research Exchange, developed by the Governance Lab, the UK-based non-profit mySociety and the World Bank — can offer pathways for sharing research findings and co-creating methodologies. These are the key areas in need of research. Data-driven decision-making. Computable information can improve governance. So it is imperative to do more systematic research to guide investment in new data-rich platforms and policies. Through data analysis, policymakers can understand the past performance of policies and services — their efficiency and their disparate impact on different populations. For example, in the United Kingdom, studies of a unique birth cohort of 70,000 people since the Second World War have generated more than 6,000 academic papers and led to an overhaul of medical support during pregnancy and childbirth2. And better data can help to predict policy outcomes. Chicago's city government, for example, created an algorithm to predict food-safety violations. This increased the effectiveness of its inspections by 25%. But it is the exception not the rule in the public sector to use advanced analytics, not the rule. Even when algorithmic approaches are adopted, such as to measure the risk of reoffending, outcomes are rarely evaluated. Few people working for government have the data-science skills needed to conduct such research. Open government data. Many nations collect and publish government information in freely reusable forms. The impact of these data on solving public problems needs study. In the United States, data from universities and transport authorities have been transformed into apps to help the public make more-informed decisions about their university education and their commutes to work. And open data can promote civil rights. For example, civil-rights lawyers in Zanesville, Ohio, used data released by utility companies to uncover a 50-year pattern of racial discrimination in water-service provision3. But more research is needed on the impact of open data on governing and problem solving. For example, many governments assume that, by helping consumers to make more effective choices, the collection and disclosure of information on energy efficiency or mobile-phone tariffs lets them regulate industry with little administrative burden. But under what circumstances are disclosures more effective than command-and-control regulations? This is a testable research question. The potential public good of companies giving consumers access to the data they each generate also needs researching. The Small Data Lab at Cornell Tech in New York City is investigating what happens when online supermarkets open up purchase data to individuals, and to researchers on their behalf. The team is testing tools that use such information to 'nudge' people towards healthier eating, with personalized coaching derived from their data. Responsible data use. To move towards evidence-based decision-making, citizens must probe how to make use of administrative data collected about them by the government. The London-based non-profit organization New Philanthropy Capital has been testing a model for a secure 'data lab'. The lab accepts outside requests to use UK Ministry of Justice administrative data about criminals who reoffend to measure the effectiveness of social-service programmes. It next wants to test the approach with Britain's National Health Service to use health and social-care data to evaluate programme effectiveness while safeguarding privacy. Research is urgently needed on the impact of algorithms on public life — of the kind being done by Lee Rainie at the Pew Research Center in Washington DC, who is studying both the ways in which algorithms might be used to solve societal problems and their potential for misuse. Questions about the impact of data-driven decision-making on civil liberties go beyond the usual issues of surveillance and privacy. There are ethical implications for the 'digital invisibles' — people on whom data are not collected. Justin Longo, a open-government researcher at the University of Regina in Canada, has found that people who aren't represented in the big-data world may be subject to misguided interventions and biased policy. Citizen engagement. Whether obtaining diverse public input through the Internet improves the legitimacy and efficacy of governing processes is another hypothesis in need of testing. Crowdsourcing and open innovation have been used in the public sector, but the practices are not well institutionalized. There is a dearth of research on how public organizations engage with civil servants and the public online, and thus a lack of insight into how to design successful online engagement processes and institutions. What are the best ways to devise participatory opportunities at each stage of public decision-making, from problem solving to policy evaluation? At Arizona State University, the Center for Policy Informatics is partnering with the city of Phoenix to test and develop ways of including the expertise, experience and priorities of citizens in urban planning. Approaches range from sophisticated computer models to coloured pieces of paper scaled to the sizes of budget proposals. Crowdsourcing environmental data holds great promise, as citizen scientists worldwide are doing in the SciStarter, CrowdCrafting and Safecast online communities. There are myriad natural experiments on citizen participation in lawmaking, from Brazil to Canada and France. But research lags behind and lessons are not being learned. Incentives. To design participatory governing processes for the digital age, researchers must dig into the age-old question of human motivation. There is a well-developed literature on crowdsourcing in business and science, but there is too little understanding of what drives different kinds of individuals to take part in online policy consultations and what motivates governments to run them. Research led by Karim Lakhani at Harvard Business School in Boston, Massachusetts, suggests4 that people respond to intrinsic incentives (such as membership of a group) more than they do to extrinsic ones (such as the offer of an iPad). Companies may need other encouragements to share data that help solve public problems. At New York University, Stefaan Verhulst and Andrew Young study different ways of getting companies to do so. They are creating and studying such data-sharing arrangements, what they call data collaboratives, in partnership with UNICEF, the United Nations' children's charity. We also need to know more about who participates. To 'unmask the crowd', Tanja Aitamurto at Stanford University in California and colleagues have studied5 a crowdsourced law-reform initiative in Finland and found that it mostly involved educated professional males. To accelerate research into how real-world institutions could improve through technology, I offer these short-term prescriptions. First, more conferences in more disciplines should address how to introduce research, including experimental design, to study innovations in governing. Anita McGahan, who studies strategic management at Toronto University in Canada, made opening governance the theme of the 2015 annual conference of business-school researchers when she was president of the US-based Academy of Management, an association for management researchers. Henry Farrell, a political scientist at George Washington University in Washington DC, brings together computer and political scientists to develop a common understanding of collective problem solving. Second, in addition to philanthropic investment, more agency budgets at every level of government should pay for research into agency operations. Although dedicated science agencies fund external research on innovation, almost no money goes towards addressing internal innovation. Third, public officials need to know how and when to design experiments that will yield insight while protecting taxpayers' money. Policy agencies such as the UK Cabinet Office and the US Office of Management and Budget (OMB) should offer guidance and training on how to design responsible research experiments including randomized controlled trials. Fourth, government bodies need streamlined ways of collaborating with academia, such as the authority to recruit and to create short-term fellowships. The Social and Behavioral Sciences Team, a cross-agency group that was part of former US president Barack Obama's administration, routinely collaborated with and brought in outside academic experts to complete rigorous evaluations of more than 30 trials of new policy interventions. Fifth, where academics cannot be brought into government, agencies should push questions out. The United States has legal authority under the America Competes Act to award prizes to members of the public for solving difficult problems. US federal agencies have conducted such prize-based challenges more than 750 times on Challenge.gov, inviting the public to reduce casualties from runaway vehicles at military checkpoints or to compose a catchy public service announcement to increase handwashing and prevent the spread of influenza. Finally, rules on ethical but efficient administration of research need to be clarified. For example, US regulations on human-subjects research exempt from ethical review any research on how government service and benefits are delivered — but make no mention of the study of governance innovations. The United States should streamline its Paperwork Reduction Act statute, which requires that agencies wishing to ask questions of the public submit to a lengthy approval process by the OMB. In the face of increasingly complex challenges, rapid social change and technological innovation, governments must find new ways to do more with less. Despite declining tax revenues and deteriorating fiscal conditions, public expectations of what governments should deliver have risen. In every domain, governments need to innovate in how we respond to challenges. It is not enough to experiment with new policies in the laboratory of democracy if we use the same beakers. We need to change the processes by which we make policy and deliver services for the public good. Empirical yet agile research in the wild is the route to knowing how.


News Article | April 28, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

DUBAI, Vereinigte Arabische Emirate--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Die Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne in der Schweiz erhielt den zweiten Platz in einem weltweiten Wettbewerb, der die Frage der Wasserknappheit mit innovativen Lösungen angeht. Der von der UAE Water Aid Foundation (Suqia) betreute Wettbewerb umfasst drei Hauptkategorien: Innovative Projects Award (kleine und große Projekte), Innovative Research and Development Award (nationale und internationale Institutionen) und den Innovative Youth Award. Die Schweizer Hochschule belegte den zweiten Platz in der zweiten Kategorie. In seiner Rede wies S.E. Saeed Mohammed Al Tayer, Vorsitzender des Kuratoriums von Suqia, darauf hin, dass nach Angaben der UNICEF Hunderte von Millionen Kindern in Zukunft keinen Zugang zu sauberem Wasser haben werden und dass Mädchen zu Lasten ihrer Ausbildung schon heute täglich 200 Millionen Stunden am Tag mit dem Holen von Wasser verbringen. Er wies ferner darauf hin, dass das Kinderhilfswerk der Vereinten Nationen davor warnt, dass bis zum Jahr 2040 600 Millionen Kinder in Gebieten mit stark eingeschränkten Wasserressourcen leben und dadurch der Gefahr tödlicher Erkrankungen ausgesetzt sein werden.


Cannes Lions launches 2017 Young Lions Health Award in association with UNICEF and "la Caixa" Foundation Lions Health has launched the 2017 Young Lions Health Award in partnership with UNICEF and "la Caixa" Foundation. Now in its third year, the competition challenges young creative communications professionals to present a core idea, including a launch event/activation, digital activation and video idea, aimed to be launched on World Pneumonia Day, 12 November. "The medical sector is advancing rapidly. Creativity can save lives. That is why we need to harness young talent from the industry to win the battle against pneumonia - the cause of most children's deaths from disease worldwide. Together with our partner "la Caixa" Foundation, we are delighted to raise the profile of the issue on the global stage of Lions Health to make sure that every child survives pneumonia," said Gerard Bocquenet - Director, Private Fundraising and Partnerships, UNICEF. Submissions should work across multiple channels and be scalable globally or locally to generate public engagement and raise awareness of the fight against pneumonia. In doing so the campaign should encourage advocacy and be driven by a long-term strategy. Speaking at the launch, Louise Benson, Executive Festival Director, Lions Health said, "We see time and time again that creativity can make a difference and Lions Health embodies this belief. This competition looks to young marketers from around the world to draw on their creativity to raise awareness and be part of a project that will save lives." "This project is a great example of the crossover between inventiveness and healthcare. Professionals in the creative healthcare communications industry have such a wealth of knowledge and it's great to be able to provide young creatives with an opportunity to bring their ideas to a global audience with UNICEF at Lions Health," said Ariadna Bardolet, International Programmes Department Director, "la Caixa" Banking Foundation. The winner of the Young Lions Health Award will be invited to attend Lions Health on 17-18 June in Cannes, France, where they will receive their award during the official ceremony attended by 1,000 experts from the healthcare communications industry. "We're excited to return to Cannes Lions Health this year. The intersection of technology and creativity is extremely exciting in the Health and Wellness sector at this moment in time. This exhibition highlights the best of the best and we are thrilled to be part of it," said Mary Ann Belliveau, National Director of Health and Wellness, Twitter. Communication and marketing professionals under the age of 30 are invited to submit their campaign concepts online at www.canneslions.com/lions_health/ and the deadline for entering is 24 April. NOTES TO EDITORS Lions Health runs from 17-18 June, in Cannes, France, during the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity. Entry to Lions Health is included in the Complete pass, and standalone passes are also available. The new 4 Day Pass offers access to the first four days of the Festival, including Lions Health, Lions Innovation and the Festival Fringe. Cannes Lions 17 - 24 June Lions Health 17-18 June Lions Innovation 19-20 June Lions Entertainment 21-22 June For further details on all available passes and dates, see https://www.canneslions.com/festival/passes and to find out what's on, visit https://www.canneslions.com. To find out more about entering work, see https://www.canneslions.com/awards/the-lions. This year, applications for press accreditation will close on 31 May 2017, due to an increase in requests to attend. Accreditation will not be open on site during the event, so please ensure you apply before the deadline so your application can be assessed. About Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity The International Festival of Creativity, also known as Cannes Lions, is the world's leading celebration of creativity in communications and encompasses Lions Health, Lions Innovation and Lions Entertainment. Founded in 1954, the Festival takes place every June in Cannes, France. As the most prestigious international annual advertising and communications awards, over 43,000 entries from all over the world are showcased and judged at the Festival. The eight-day Festival is the only truly global meeting place for professionals working in advertising and communications. A community of 15,000 attendees from nearly 100 countries attend eight days of workshops, exhibitions, screenings, master classes and high-profile seminars presented by renowned worldwide industry leaders. Winning companies receive the highly coveted Lion trophy, a global benchmark of creative excellence, for Creative Data, Creative Effectiveness, Cyber, Design, Digital Craft, Direct, Film, Film Craft, Glass: The Lion for Change, Health & Wellness, Innovation, Entertainment, Media, Mobile, Music, Outdoor, Pharma, PR, Print & Publishing, Product Design, Promo & Activation, Radio, Titanium and Integrated Lions. The Festival is also the only truly global meeting place for advertisers, advertising and communication professionals. www.canneslions.com Ascential Events Ascential Events is an international business-to-business media company with a focused portfolio of large-scale exhibitions, congresses and festivals. Our product lines include the prestigious Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity, the world's premier market leading payments and financial services innovation congress Money 20/20, the UK's largest trade show Spring Fair International and the award-winning education technology show Bett. Ascential Events is part of Ascential plc, which transforms knowledge businesses to deliver exceptional performance. www.ascential.com. Source: Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity Topic: Trade Show or Conference Sectors: Advertising http://www.acnnewswire.com From the Asia Corporate News Network

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