Waltham, MA, United States
Waltham, MA, United States

UNICA , the Brazilian Sugarcane Industry Association, is a lobbying organization of producers of sugarcane and ethanol fuel. UNICA members are responsible for more than 50% of all ethanol produced in Brazil and 60% of overall sugar production.UNICA's headquarters are located in the city of São Paulo, Brazil, and also has offices in Washington D.C. and Brussels. Wikipedia.


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Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: MG-5.1-2014 | Award Amount: 5.99M | Year: 2015

The overall aim of ELIPTIC is to develop new use concepts and business cases to optimise existing electric infrastructure and rolling stock, saving both money and energy. ELIPTIC will advocate electric public transport sector at the political level and help develop political support for the electrification of public transport across Europe. ELIPTIC looks at three thematic pillars: Safe integration of ebuses into existing electric PT infrastructure through (re)charging ebuses en route, upgrading trolleybus networks with battery buses or trolleyhybrids and automatic wiring/de-wiring technology upgrading and/or regenerating electric public transport systems (flywheel, reversible substations) Multi-purpose use of electric public transport infrastructure: safe (re)charging of non-public transport vehicles (pedelecs, electric cars/ taxis, utility trucks) With a strong focus on end users, ELIPTIC will analyse 23 use cases within the three thematic pillars. The project will support uptake and exploitation of results by developing guidelines and tools for implementation schemes for upgrading and/or regenerating electric public transport systems. Option generator and decision-making support tools, strategies and policy recommendations will be created to foster Europe-wide take up and rollout of various development schemes. Partners and other cities will benefit from ELIPTICs stakeholder and user forum approach. ELIPTIC addresses the challenge of transforming the use of conventionally fuelled vehicles in urban areas by focusing on increasing the capacity of electric public transport, reducing the need for individual travel in urban areas and by expanding electric intermodal options (e.g. linking e-cars charging to tram infrastructure) for long-distance commuters. The project will strengthen the role of electric public transport, leading to both a significant reduction in fossil fuel consumption and to an improvement in air quality through reduced local emissions.


News Article | November 16, 2016
Site: www.marketwired.com

Provides Growth Capital for Cloud Software Leader to Drive Digital Transformation across Industries NEW YORK, NY--(Marketwired - November 16, 2016) - Infor, a leading provider of business applications specialized by industry and built for the cloud, today announced it has reached a definitive agreement in which Koch Equity Development LLC ("KED"), the investment and acquisition subsidiary of Koch Industries, Inc., has agreed to make an investment of more than $2 billion in the company. The investment will provide Infor access to additional growth capital to accelerate innovation, expand distribution, and continue disrupting the enterprise applications industry. KED's investment is strong validation of Infor's strategy and growth -- a journey fueled by product investment, innovation, and an entrepreneurial culture. Koch Industries is an American multinational corporation that employs 100,000 people globally and is estimated by Forbes to be the second largest privately-held company in the United States with annual revenue of approximately $100 billion. The investment by KED significantly strengthens Infor's capital base and provides an entrée into a large ecosystem of businesses contemplating digital transformation. Infor became the first company to move mission critical industry applications to the cloud, and now counts more than 66 million users of its cloud applications. The company's double digit revenue growth in its most recent quarter was fueled by a 130% annual increase in SaaS revenue; more than half of Infor's software revenues are now derived from cloud applications. Infor's unique cloud strategy uses Amazon Web Services, enabling the company to invest in deep industry functionality with capital that would otherwise be needed to maintain its own data center infrastructure. Infor's broad set of applications running on a hyper-scale cloud with cutting-edge data science and design provide a foundation for modernizing companies in healthcare, fashion, retail, distribution, public sector, and discrete and process manufacturing. The Infor management team is headed by Chief Executive Officer Charles Phillips, who is leading the company into a new phase of growth, investment, and innovation. "Koch is one of the largest private companies in the world with diversified holdings and immense resources to support the next exciting phase of growth at Infor and we are thrilled to have their support," said Charles Phillips, CEO of Infor. "Some of the largest companies in the world have approached Infor looking for a modern alternative to the legacy options available for mission critical business applications. Infor has the scale and capital to provide a digital platform for the Global 5000." Under Phillips' leadership, Infor invested approximately $2 billion in product design and development over the last five years and delivered more than 400 new products, 1,700 integrations, and 16,000 industry features in its CloudSuite product line. Infor now has 15,000 employees and operates in more than 170 countries. Key milestones include: Leadership Quotes "Over the last 15 years, Infor has grown from a small company to one of the most significant enterprise software companies in the world and it's been an amazing thing to be a part of," said Infor Board member Jim Schaper. "The support we are providing to Infor marks one of the largest investments KED has ever made and demonstrates the confidence we have in Infor's technology, team and business model," said Matt Flamini, KED's President. "Infor's demonstrated capability to help companies across a wide spectrum of industries automate and improve efficiency is relevant to our broad portfolio of invested companies and we look forward to exploring co-innovation opportunities," said Brett Watson, Senior Managing Director of KED. "We are extremely pleased with the progress the Infor team has made in scaling and executing into the massive opportunity in enterprise technology applications," said David Dominik, Managing Director of Golden Gate Capital, which made its first investment in Infor in 2002. "KED's investment is a tremendous endorsement and we look forward to working together with them and supporting management as they continue delivering industry-leading software applications to a growing list of world class customers." "We remain a meaningful investor in Infor and will continue to support the company in the years ahead," said Rishi Chandna, Managing Director at Golden Gate Capital. Transaction Overview This transaction, which is subject to customary closing conditions and regulatory approvals, is expected to close in early 2017. The KED investment will be a combination of preferred and common equity. Infor's existing shareholders, including Golden Gate Capital, Summit Partners, and Management will maintain control of the company. KED will have the right to appoint four of nine directors on the board of Infor's parent company. Morgan Stanley and Bank of America Merrill Lynch are serving as Infor's lead financial advisors, and Gibson Dunn is serving as outside legal counsel. Credit Suisse also provided financial advice to the company. Kirkland & Ellis LLP is serving as outside legal advisor to Golden Gate and Summit Partners. Rothschild, Inc. is serving as exclusive financial advisor to KED, and Jones Day is serving as outside legal counsel. About Infor Infor builds business software for specific industries in the cloud. With 15,000 employees and more than 90,000 customers in over 200 countries and territories, Infor software is designed for progress. To learn more, please visit www.infor.com. About Koch Equity Development LLC With offices in Wichita and London, KED focuses its efforts on strategic acquisitions for the Koch companies and industry agnostic principal investments. Significant principal investments completed over the last year include Solera Holdings Inc., The ADT Corporation, Transaction Network Services, and Truck-Lite. Since 2003, Koch companies have invested about $80 billion in acquisitions and other capital expenditures. With a presence in more than 60 countries, Koch companies employ more than 100,000 people worldwide, with about 60,000 of those in the United States. From January 2009 to present, Koch companies have earned more than 1,000 awards for safety, environmental excellence, community stewardship, innovation, and customer service. To learn more about Koch Equity Development LLC or Koch Industries, please visit http://www.kochequity.com/ or http://www.kochind.com/. About Golden Gate Capital Golden Gate Capital is a San Francisco-based private equity investment firm with over $15 billion of capital under management. The principals of Golden Gate Capital have a long and successful history of investing across a wide range of industries and transaction types, including going-privates, corporate divestitures, and recapitalizations, as well as debt and public equity investments. Golden Gate Capital is one of the most active software investors in the world. Other notable software investments sponsored by Golden Gate Capital include BMC Software, Ex Libris, Micro Focus and LiveVox. For more information, visit www.goldengatecap.com. About Summit Partners Founded in 1984, Summit Partners is a growth equity firm that is currently investing more than $7.2 billion into equity and fixed income opportunities. Summit has invested in more than 440 companies in technology, healthcare and other growth sectors. These companies have completed more than 140 public offerings, and more than 165 have been acquired through strategic mergers and sales. Notable technology companies financed by Summit Partners include Avast, Calypso Technology, Flow Traders, HelpSystems, Hyperion Solutions, McAfee, NetWitness, RightNow, SafeBoot, Unica, Uber and WebEx. Summit maintains offices in North America and Europe and invests in companies around the world. For more information, visit www.summitpartners.com or follow on Twitter at @SummitPartners.


Portable multifunction piece of furniture (10), having a structure (11) that comprises a first functional module (12) adapted for preparing and dispensing drinks, in particular mixtures of several ingredients adapted for forming cocktails, a second functional module (26) having the functions of a mini-bar and a third functional module (29) consisting of a stereo system. The furniture (10) can also include a further customizable functional module (30). Such a customizable functional module (30) can for example comprise a space (31) for housing a set of glasses or an ice-maker device (35) for producing ice cubes.


SAO PAULO, Nov. 11, 2016 /PRNewswire/ --  Platts Survey of Analysts (2H October) Cane crush: 31.45 million metric tons (mt) Total recoverable sugar (ATR): 139.36 kilograms per metric ton (kg/mt) Sugar production: 2.006 million metric tons (mt) Total ethanol...


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

Provides Access to Growth Capital for Cloud Software Leader to Drive Digital Transformation across Industries NEW YORK, NY--(Marketwired - February 21, 2017) - Infor, a leading provider of business applications specialized by industry and built for the cloud, today announced the completion of a previously announced investment of more than $2 billion in the company by an affiliate of Koch Equity Development LLC ("KED"), the investment and acquisition subsidiary of Koch Industries, Inc. The investment is strong validation of Infor's strategy and growth - a journey fueled by product investment, innovation, and an entrepreneurial culture - and provides Infor access to additional capital to accelerate innovation, expand distribution, and continue disrupting the enterprise applications industry. Infor's existing shareholders include Golden Gate Capital, Summit Partners, and Management. Learn more about Koch's investment in Infor: Infor builds business software for specific industries in the cloud. With 15,000 employees and more than 90,000 customers in over 170 countries, Infor software is designed for progress. To learn more, please visit www.infor.com. With offices in Wichita and London, KED focuses its efforts on strategic acquisitions for the Koch companies and industry agnostic principal investments. Significant principal investments completed over the last year include Solera Holdings Inc., The ADT Corporation, Transaction Network Services, and Truck-Lite. Since 2003, Koch companies have invested about $80 billion in acquisitions and other capital expenditures. With a presence in about 60 countries, Koch companies employ more than 120,000 people worldwide, with about 70,000 of those in the United States. From January 2009 to present, Koch companies have earned more than 1,200 awards for safety, environmental excellence, community stewardship, innovation, and customer service. To learn more about Koch Equity Development LLC or Koch Industries, please visit http://www.kochequity.com/ or http://www.kochind.com/. Golden Gate Capital is a San Francisco-based private equity investment firm with over $15 billion of capital under management. The principals of Golden Gate Capital have a long and successful history of investing across a wide range of industries and transaction types, including going-privates, corporate divestitures, and recapitalizations, as well as debt and public equity investments. Golden Gate Capital is one of the most active software investors in the world. Other notable software investments sponsored by Golden Gate Capital include BMC Software, Ex Libris, Micro Focus and LiveVox. For more information, visit www.goldengatecap.com. Founded in 1984, Summit Partners is a global alternative investment firm that is currently investing more than $7.2 billion into growth equity, fixed income and public equity opportunities. Summit has invested in more than 440 companies in technology, healthcare and other growth sectors. These companies have completed more than 140 public offerings, and more than 165 have been acquired through strategic mergers and sales. Notable technology companies financed by Summit Partners include Avast, Calypso Technology, Flow Traders, HelpSystems, Hyperion Solutions, McAfee, NetWitness, RightNow, SafeBoot, Unica, Uber and WebEx. Summit maintains offices in North America and Europe and invests in companies around the world. For more information, visit www.summitpartners.com or follow on Twitter at @SummitPartners.


VICENZA--(BUSINESS WIRE)--ILSA, produttore italiano di concimi organici azotati e prodotti speciali per la biostimolazione dei vegetali, ha festeggiato il primo quintale di concentrato di triacontanolo naturale estratto dalle fabaceae e prodotto attraverso il nuovo impianto di estrazione con CO2 supercritica. Unica azienda al mondo ad utilizzare questa tecnologia in ambito agricolo, ILSA usa il triacontanolo naturale come base per la produzione dei suoi biostimolanti per le colture. Sull’effica


News Article | April 7, 2015
Site: www.wired.com

Imagine if, due to some fluke in the development of projection technology, The Empire Strikes Back had only been shown in a couple of movie theaters. Imagine it fading into obscurity and existing for decades as nothing more than a cult film, a historical footnote, an object of fascination among serious movie buffs. If you have eyeballs, you’ve almost certainly seen Helvetica. It’s one of the most widely used typefaces ever created, so popular that it generated a documentary examining its popularity. It’s almost equally certain that you have not seen Haas Unica, the typeface designed to be Helvetica’s sequel of sorts. Introduced in 1980, it was lost to history almost instantly upon its arrival. Now, after languishing in obscurity for decades, Unica has been rescued and remastered. Thanks to an effort by Monotype designer Toshi Omagari, the legendary typeface is finally available as Neue Haas Unica, an 18-font family tuned-up for the digital age. Drawn to be legible at small sizes, it could be a perfect Helvetica-substitute for user interfaces and other on-screen text elements. For designers, though, the new Unica is an exciting visitor from the past. As Pentagram partner J. Abbott Miller puts it, “There is a Rip van Winkle quality of a font having woken up after 30 years of sleep.” Helvetica was developed in 1957 by Swiss designer Max Miedinger. Designed as an update of the so-called “grotesque” typefaces developed in Germany in the late 19th Century, it was explosively popular, and by the mid-1970s, it had utterly transformed how the written word appeared throughout modern life. It was the de facto typeface for corporations of the day, employed by Knoll, BMW, American Airlines and hundreds of other companies. It brought a clear, modern look to magazine ads, subway signs, letterheads, and Presidential campaigns. As designer Michael Bierut once remarked, at the height of its popularity, Helvetica simply seemed elemental, like air, or gravity. For people who scrutinize letters for a living, however, Helvetica’s ubiquity in the 1960s and 1970s offered a great many opportunities to notice its quirks. Designed for short blasts of texts like headlines and advertisements, Helvetica didn’t always look great at small sizes or when used for lengthy blocks of text. And because it had been designed for the hot metal typesetting techniques prevalent in the 1950s, it hadn’t translated perfectly to the phototypesetting process that became popular in the 1970s. So, in 1974, Haas, the centuries-old Swiss type foundry that had introduced Helvetica in 1957, commissioned a Swiss design team called Team’77 to come up with a follow-up to the world’s most popular typeface. The group—André Gürtler, Erich Gschwind and Christian Mengelt—set out to create something native to phototypesetting that combined the best elements of Helvetica and Univers, another hugely popular sans-serif typeface of the day with a slightly more formal design. Team’77 was rigorous in its analysis of the parent typefaces and meticulous in creating their offshoot. It took them three years to complete the job. By the time they finished Unica, however, Haas was going out of business. Further, the typographic world was on the verge of being rocked by another new technology: desktop publishing. The advent of personal computers, particularly the Macintosh, would make it possible to experiment with type in tremendous new ways. Phototypesetting, for which Unica had been designed, was quickly losing relevance. As a result, Unica got lost in the shuffle. “People didn’t get to see a lot of it,” says Monotype type director Dan Rhatigan. “It was almost a stillbirth.” In the years that followed, Unica slipped into obscurity, accumulating a sort of mythology along the way. It had been digitized in the 1980s by another company—that also promptly folded. “Because it was released by companies who went out of business, there was kind of murkiness for a while about whether or not people could do anything with Unica, which I think added to its legend,” Rhatigan says. In late 2012, Rhatigan was visiting Monotype’s outpost in Germany, which had previously been the office of storied typesetting outfit Mergenthaler Linotype Company. He was rooting around in storage, looking for old material, when he happened upon a box of tracing paper and transparent sheets. The transparent pages each had a single letter, crisp and clean and ten inches tall: The photographic film masters for Unica. Rhatigan had been dimly aware of the typeface from postings on typography forums, and for a designer who wears his love of typography on his sleeves quite literally, in the form of tattoos of cherished letters, finding the fabled typeface was a thrill. “It was so exciting,” he says. “We tried to find out, does this really mean that we are free to do with this what we want?” A short investigation revealed: Yes, Monotype owned both the name and the rights. Rhatigan showed the materials to Monotype designer Toshi Omagari, who quickly took up its resurrection as a side project. Omagari redrew the letters from scratch, following the intention of original design but fine-tuning the letters and spacing for modern, digital work. Omagari drew a number of different weights and languages. When he and Rhatigan would mention the project, people would invariably get excited. “The cult aspect became more and more obvious as we talked to people about working on it,” Rhatigan says. “People knew about Unica. But since it wasn’t widely available, a lot of people did not have a chance to work with it and see if it was as good as the legend that had grown up around it. It really was this sort of lost treasure.” To your eyes and mine, the differences between Unica and Helvetica will be nearly imperceptible. The cross-stroke on the capital Q has been nudged slightly upward. The lower-case t has been shaved at the top. To designers like Omagari and Rhatigan, however, the differences are perfectly obvious. Even looking at the film masters, Rhatigan says, he could see “all the detail, all the intention that was in there.” Team’77 detailed that intention in an elaborate document from 1980, published in tandem with Unica’s release. The group started by rigorously measuring letters from Helvetica, both in its original metal form and in a second version made for phototypesetting. They then proposed dozens of adjustments. Where Helvetica’s capital letters were blocky and tended towards a uniform width, Team’77 restored Unica’s capitals to more natural proportions. The designers balanced the thickness of strokes throughout the alphabet and tweaked spacing. As a result, the group concluded, Unica had “tighter rhythm in upper case composition” and “improve[d] readability…especially for continuous text.” That readability is what draws Rhatigan to the font. Helvetica was designed for use in headlines and advertisements, but when people started using it indiscriminately for larger chunks of smaller-set text, it lost some of its magic. “Helvetica looks so great when it’s handled skillfully and used for these big bold graphic treatments, but as an everyday information typeface, it falls a little flat,” Rhatigan says. Univers “is crisp and clean and it’s great, but it is a little cold,” he adds. “It’s functional but a little bit severe, let’s say.” Unica hits a sweet spot between the two, Rhatigan says: Not quite as quirky as Helvetica, not quite as dispassionate as Univers. “Unica is beautiful, crisp, and modern and rationalized, but it has that humanity in it,” he says. In a famous essay from 1955, Beatrice Warde argued that good type should be like a crystal goblet, “calculated to reveal rather than hide the beautiful thing which it was meant to contain.” Unica nudges Helvetica closer to that mark. Designers’ reactions to the new drawing, collected by Monotype, include descriptions like “beautiful,” “classic,” and “The Holy Grail.” Rhatigan thinks Unica’s strengths are especially suited to user interfaces, where readability is paramount. When Apple moved to a skinny version of Helvetica for the iPhone’s default font, it reignited debates among type-heads about Helvetica’s legibility. As designer Khoi Vinh wrote at the time, Helvetica’s letters were “optimized for those cases where there’s ample room for the eye to truly travel along their supple curves…To use them as both Google and Apple do, in text settings, in small sizes, in paragraphs, makes reading more visually cramped and more difficult than it should be.” Might Neue Haas Unica be a better go-to option for the era of screens? “That is certainly the hope,” Rhatigan says. Hrant Papazian, the designer-founder of The Microfoundry, in Los Angeles, is another long-time Unica zealot. “I guess the main reason I can cling to is that it’s not ‘naive,'” he wrote years ago in a posting to the website Typophile. He made the case for Unica with an evocative, if somewhat odd, analogy. To Papazian’s eyes, older grotesque typefaces—those early sans-serif alphabets from the 19th Century—are like “backwards villagers.” New grotesques, like Helvetica and Univers, are like “urbanites pretending to be villagers,” he wrote. “Unica is like an urbanite who has had to move in with his villager in-laws, but has decided to make the best of it,” he continued. I tried to get in touch with Papazian in hopes that he would elaborate, but I suspect type designers will know exactly what he means.


News Article | April 7, 2015
Site: gizmodo.com

They found them in a file cabinet. The original masters for a legendary typeface called Haas Unica, designed in the late 1970s and killed shortly thereafter by what amounts to bad luck—and the digital age. The person who found them was Dan Rhatigan, the Director of Type at the foundry Monotype. He was actually looking for old materials to include in an exhibition about the transition from traditional typefaces to digital ones. But in the process, he had accidentally uncovered a lost typeface that perfectly encapsulates that story. Today, Monotype is releasing Unica as a web font after spending almost 40 years nearly forgotten—and it could rival giants like Helvetica and Univers, as it was originally designed to do. So, what exactly happened to Unica? Why isn’t it the household name Helvetica or Univers are today? “The 20th century is filled with lots of lost typefaces,” Rhatigan told me today. “In the case of Unica, it was an unfortunate bit of timing.” It all began in the 1970s, when a technique called Phototypesetting overtook traditional metal as the way most foundries made their fonts. It worked a bit like developing a photo in a darkroom; the film letters could be enlarged to the perfect size, then light would expose the space around them to create an imprint. It was the bridge technology between traditional metal typesetting and the digital age, where type is made up of pixels. And unfortunately, it didn’t last very long. And it was during those short years when Phototypesetting reigned, a foundry called Haas Type set out to design an alternative to the monster hits of Helvetica and Univers. Both typefaces had enjoyed massive success for decades (as they have since), but Haas had the idea of creating a tertiary design based on the two. It tapped a trio of designers known as Team ’77 to create a lovely alternative to two of the most popular (and some would say overused) typefaces of the 20the century. What resulted was a hybrid called Haas Unica. It wasn’t quite as precious as Helvetica—it has fewer details that some call “mannered,” the things that make Helvetica so instantly recognizable. But it also has a little more personality than the cool, calm Univers, seen on the right above. Even its name was a combination of its two predecessors. It was a hit amongst designers, too. “The details were just beautiful,” says Rhatigan. It was “Univers with a heart, Helvetica with a soul,” as the designers Beatriz Cifuentes and Yoshiki Waterhouse said in a release today. Unfortunately, it was also destined to die an early death. The invention of the computer not only skyrocketed certain typefaces to household status (hello, Wingdings!), it relegated others in the dusty annals of ancient history. Like Unica. “It passed down through a chain of companies that are part of the murky history of type foundries in the 20th century,” says Rhatigan. Smaller foundries went out of business, their portfolios were absorbed by bigger companies, and decisions were made about what to digitize and what to leave in the pre-computer era. Some typefaces—especially new, unproven ones like Unica—didn’t make the cut. Through a long and contrived series of events, Unica ended up being owned by Monotype. It had simply fallen through the cracks thanks to industry-wide turmoil and technological upheaval. In the years that followed, it never quite disappeared completely. “Most type designers know if it,” Rhatigan tells me, and perhaps its inaccessibility even increased the mystery surrounding it. After Rhatigan pulled the original film out of the cabinet, he turned it over to a designer named Toshi Omagari, who has spent the past few years redeveloping it and building on the original “intent” of its 1970s designers. Today, the company is selling a web font version of it— Neue Haas Unica—in the very format that could have easily launched it to the same kind of global resurgence that Helvetica and Univers have enjoyed since the 1980s. “Monotype is in a unique position because it’s so large, and we’re comprised of so many other foundries that have existed over the years,” Rhatigan adds. What other half-forgotten legends are stuffed into cabinets and into basement archives? Only time will tell.


News Article | March 3, 2015
Site: www.zdnet.com

Hewlett-Packard on Tuesday said that it has landed a systems and networking integration pact with Telefonica. The win is welcome news for HP, which said last week that its networking unit struggled in the company's fiscal first quarter. HP cited execution issues in China and the U.S. Under the Telefonica deal, the company will use HP's OpenNFV platform, which includes server, software, orchestration and networking technology as well as hooks into the HP Helion OpenStack service. NFV, or network functions virtualization, is a technology that's supposed to allow carriers to better provision services on the fly. Telefonica is looking to move from its proprietary architecture to a virtualization powered one called UNICA. Telefonica will also use HP's software defined networking tools. According to Telefonica, the company is looking to virtualize non-critical systems, move to virtual core networking technology and then use virtualization for home subscriber servers and other critical applications. The stack Telefonica is rolling out includes HP's converged infrastructure, Helion CloudSystem, NFV Director, Helion OpenStack and distributed cloud networking. HP said there's also a consulting and services component to the deal.


News Article | November 4, 2015
Site: www.fastcompany.com

First created by famed British typeface designer Eric Gill in 1928, Gill Sans has been used over the years by everyone from the BBC to Ferris Bueller. Its most iconic use, though, is probably on the jackets of Penguin paperbacks starting in 1935. Penguin's vintage covers are a good illustration of both Gill Sans's strengths (it's an excellent font for headlines, titles, and logos), as well as its drawbacks (it's much poorer at body text). Joanna, Eric Gill's lovely serif typeface, has similar qualities, which is why Penguin used it on the covers of their Modern Classics series, starting in the 1960s. Add in the fact that both typefaces are looking a little frayed in the digital age, and it's no wonder that Monotype is remastering Gill Sans and Joanna for the 21st century as Gill Sans Nova and Joanna Nova. But they're not stopping there. In addition to expanding and cleaning up Gill Sans and Joanna, Monotype is releasing a new typeface, called Joanna Sans Nova, which combines the DNA of both fonts to create a humanist sans serif. The result is the first Gill-family font designed for pixels, and not hot type. "The reason we're doing this is because Monotype needs to have both a foot in the past and a foot in the future," says Steve Matteson, creative type director at Monotype. "We have this amazing legacy, represented by Eric Gill and other famous designers, who brought a rich tradition of type to our company. But we also need to focus on contemporary type designs for contemporary needs. With the Eric Gill Series, it was a unique opportunity to put both of those feet on the same page." Monotype is no stranger to remastering typefaces from its archives: It has previously remastered Verdana and Georgia, Unica, and many others. There are many reasons why you might remaster a typeface—perhaps expanding it with new characters and weights. And that's certainly true of Gill Sans Nova and Joanna Nova, which gain both features. But the real reason Monotype is remastering these fonts has to do with the time in which they were originally created. "Both Gill Sans and Joanna were originally designed for Monotype machine typesetting," Matteson explains. In other words, each character in these typefaces needed to be physically carved out of a piece of metal, so Gill Sans and Joanna were originally optimized for a finite number of point sizes. In the digital age, though, a font can be anywhere from 6 points on an Apple Watch to 1,000 points on a billboard. To keep up, Gill Sans and Joanna needed to be unbounded, tweaking their designs so they looked clean, crisp, and readable at a nearly infinite number of sizes, weights, and mediums. The remastering of the Eric Gill Family has also allowed Monotype to expand these typefaces in fun, unexpected, and sometimes obscure ways. Matteson tells me that Monotype, over the years, has occasionally created custom versions of Gill Sans for various customers. One such variation called Gill Sans Deco, which contained drop shadows, was withdrawn from production because it was simply too expensive to maintain. But now it's a part of Gill Sans Nova. Likewise, when Gill Sans was first released, its main competition was Futura, prompting some Monotype customers to ask if Gill Sans could be retrofitted with the pointy tips of the font (now a Wes Anderson favorite). They weren't ever part of the regular production of Gill Sans, but for Gill Sans Nova, Monotype has introduced these Futura hybrids as alternate characters. (Joana Sans Nova also has some adorable alternate characters, such as a curvy, loopy K.) But let's not forget the other half of the equation: Joanna Sans Nova. Designed not just to be a digital-first typeface, perfect for reading on screens, it also fills a hole in the Eric Gill Family of fonts as a go-to for body text. "The three typefaces work perfectly together in a publishing situation," he says. "For a magazine, you might put your subheadings in Joanna Nova, the bulk of your text in Joanna Sans Nova, and your headlines in Gill Sans Nova." After spending two years as part of a team of three other designers (George Ryan, Ben Jones, and Terrance Weinzierl) putting the Eric Gill Series together, Matteson says he's confident that these three new typefaces can now stand up to the scrutiny of the 21st century. But would they stand up to the scrutiny of Eric Gill, the notoriously fussy perfectionist? "Is Eric Gill rolling over in his grave? Probably yes," laughs Matteson. "He was quite a character, but he also had a big ego. He wanted the public to appreciate his work. So even if he's rolling in his grave over some of our decisions, we think he'd still be in approval of bringing his work into the 21st century. He'd be happy he's still relevant." The new typefaces are available for license and download from MyFonts, Fonts.com, and Linotype.com.

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