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Patent
Unic | Date: 2015-04-21

A device for extracting a substance to be brewed comprising: an extraction compartment in a first and a second portion, movable relative to the first portion to switch the compartment between a closed position and an open position; a linking device between the first and the second portion, comprising a holder with a first link so configured as to produce a rotation of the holder relative to the first portion, and a second link relative to the second portion, and the device comprises an articulation joint so configured as to successively produce, during a rotational motion of the holder about the first link in a first direction of rotation, a first tilting of the second portion in the first direction, then a second tilting of the second portion in a second direction opposite the first direction.


News Article | December 17, 2016
Site: www.PR.com

Receive press releases from Strathmore Who's Who: By Email Doni-Jo Minor-Munro Named Strathmore’s Who’s Who Biography of the Month Doni-Jo Minor-Munro, of Santa Maria, California, has recently been named the Strathmore’s Who’s Who Biography of the Month of November, 2017, for her outstanding contributions and achievements in the field of American Indian Educational Programs. Doni-Jo Minor-Munro is CEO/CFO of Our Children Are Sacred, Inc./American Indian Education Programs. In addition, she is a Native American Spiritualist and Director of Education at the University Life Church. Ms. Minor-Munro attended the University of Oregon, College of Education. She is an advocate for urban Indian rights and laws. Ms. Minor-Munro is affiliated with UNIC and is a member of the National Indian Education Association. About Strathmore’s Who’s Who Strathmore's Who's Who publishes an annual two thousand page hard cover biographical registry, honoring successful individuals in the fields of Business, the Arts and Sciences, Law, Engineering and Government. Based on one's position and lifetime of accomplishments, we honor professional men and women in all academic areas and professions. Inclusion is limited to individuals who have demonstrated leadership and achievement in their occupation, industry or profession. Santa Maria, CA, December 17, 2016 --( PR.com )-- About Doni-Jo Minor-MunroDoni-Jo Minor-Munro is CEO/CFO of Our Children Are Sacred, Inc./American Indian Education Programs. In addition, she is a Native American Spiritualist and Director of Education at the University Life Church. Ms. Minor-Munro attended the University of Oregon, College of Education. She is an advocate for urban Indian rights and laws. Ms. Minor-Munro is affiliated with UNIC and is a member of the National Indian Education Association.About Strathmore’s Who’s WhoStrathmore's Who's Who publishes an annual two thousand page hard cover biographical registry, honoring successful individuals in the fields of Business, the Arts and Sciences, Law, Engineering and Government. Based on one's position and lifetime of accomplishments, we honor professional men and women in all academic areas and professions. Inclusion is limited to individuals who have demonstrated leadership and achievement in their occupation, industry or profession. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from Strathmore Who's Who


V. Faria D.M.,Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne | Einpaul J.,Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne | P. Ramos A.M.,UNIC | Fernandez Ruiz M.,Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne | Muttoni A.,Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne
Construction and Building Materials | Year: 2014

One possibility for strengthening existing flat slabs consists on gluing fibre reinforced polymers (FRPs) at the concrete surface. When applied on top of slab-column connections, this technique allows increasing the flexural stiffness and strength of the slab as well as its punching strength. Nevertheless, the higher punching strength is associated to a reduction on the deformation capacity of the slab-column connection, which can be detrimental for the overall behaviour of the structure (leading to a more brittle behaviour of the system). Design approaches for this strengthening technique are usually based on empirical formulas calibrated on the basis of the tests performed on isolated test specimens. However, some significant topics as the reduction on the deformation capacity or the influence of the whole slab (accounting for the reinforcement at mid-span) on the efficiency of the strengthening are neglected. In this paper, a critical review of this technique for strengthening against punching shear is investigated on the basis of the physical model proposed by the Critical Shear Crack Theory (CSCT). This approach allows taking into account the amount, layout and mechanical behaviour of the bonded FRP's in a consistent manner to estimate the punching strength and deformation capacity of strengthened slabs. The approach is first used to predict the punching strength of available test data, showing a good agreement. Then, it is applied in order to investigate strengthened continuous slabs, considering moment redistribution after concrete cracking and reinforcement yielding. This latter study provides valuable information regarding the differences between the behaviour of isolated test specimens and real strengthened flat slabs. The results show that empirical formulas calibrated on isolated specimens may overestimate the actual performance of FRP's strengthening. Finally, taking advantage of the physical model of the CSCT, the effect of the construction sequence on the punching shear strength is also evaluated, revealing the role of this issue which is also neglected in most empirical approaches. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Rodrigues A.F.S.,UNIC | Dimitrovova Z.,New University of Lisbon | Dimitrovova Z.,University of Lisbon
11th World Congress on Computational Mechanics, WCCM 2014, 5th European Conference on Computational Mechanics, ECCM 2014 and 6th European Conference on Computational Fluid Dynamics, ECFD 2014 | Year: 2014

The numerical analysis of the wave propagation problem, from elastic to electromagnetic waves, is often faced with the problem of dealing with unbounded media. Since the domain of finite-difference and finite element methods must be itself finite, various truncation techniques have been proposed over the last decades, such as absorbing boundary conditions (Lysmer and Kuhlemeyer[1]), infinite elements (Bettess [2]) and absorbing boundary layers (such as the Perfectly Matched Layer, or PML, introduced by Bérenger [3]). In this paper, the Caughey Absorbing Layer Method (CALM), proposed by Semblat et al. [4], is implemented in the commercial finite element software Ansys, using an implicit dynamics formulation. It is tested for one- and two-dimensional problems and its efficiency is compared with that of the Lysmer-Kuhlemeyer absorbing boundaries. The dependency on material parameters, loss factor and load frequency is also tested. To mitigate the problem of wave reflection at the interface between the medium of interest and the absorbing layer, different variations of damping along the layer's length are tested and their efficiency compared. By analysing the maximum displacement and the L2-norm of the displacement field, the implementation of the CALM in Ansys is shown to be effective at mitigating the problem of spurious wave reflection at the boundaries. Their performance is clearly superior to the Lysmer absorbing boundary conditions, but at a greater computational cost due to the additional degrees of freedom. The quadratic variation of the Rayleigh damping has proved to be the most effective, and an estimate of the optimum loss factor as a function of the length of the layer in relation to the wavelength to absorb was proposed. Although the optimal damping is frequency dependent, it was shown to work well even if the frequency is overestimated or greatly underestimated.


Henriques D.,UNIC | Goncalves R.,UNIC | Camotim D.,University of Lisbon
11th World Congress on Computational Mechanics, WCCM 2014, 5th European Conference on Computational Mechanics, ECCM 2014 and 6th European Conference on Computational Fluid Dynamics, ECFD 2014 | Year: 2014

In recent papers, the authors have presented Generalized Beam Theory (GBT) formulations specifically designed for performing efficient (i) linear analyses of steel-concrete composite bridges [1] and (ii) elastoplastic collapse analyses of thin-walled steel members [2, 3]. This paper presents an extension of these previous formulations that includes non-linear reinforced concrete material behaviour, aiming at analysing, accurately and efficiently, steel-concrete composite beams. In particular, steel beam and rebar plastification is implemented, together with concrete cracking/crushing and shear-lag effects. Several illustrative examples are presented and discussed. For validation and comparison purposes, results obtained with shell/solid finite element models are provided.


Transversal vibrations induced by a load moving at a constant speed along a finite or an infinite beam resting on a piece-wise homogeneous visco-elastic foundation are studied. Special attention is paid to the amplification of the vibrations which arise as the point load traverses a foundation discontinuity. The governing equations of the problem are solved by the normal-mode analysis. The solution is expressed in the form of an infinite sum of orthogonal natural modes multiplied by the generalized displacements. The natural frequencies are obtained numerically exploiting the concept of the global dynamic stiffness matrix. This ensures that the frequencies obtained are accurate. The methodology is neither restricted by load velocity nor damping and is simple to use, though obtaining the numerical expression of the results is not straightforward. A general procedure for numerical implementation is presented and verified. There is no restriction for finite structures, however, for infinite structures, validity of the results is restricted to a "region of interest" of finite length. To illustrate the methodology, the probability of exceeding an admissible upward displacement is determined when the load travels at a certain velocity according to the normal distribution. In this problem, the given structure has an intermediate part of adaptable foundation stiffness, which is optimized in a parametric way, enabling to draw important conclusions about the optimum intermediate stiffness. The results obtained have direct application on the analysis of railway track vibrations induced by high-speed trains crossing regions with significantly different foundation stiffness. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Goncalves R.,UNIC | Ritto-Correa M.,University of Lisbon | Camotim D.,University of Lisbon
Computational Mechanics | Year: 2010

This paper presents a new and general approach for the calculation of cross-section deformation modes in thin-walled beams, to be used in the framework of generalized beam theory (GBT). The proposed approach subdivides and hierarchizes the cross-section deformation modes by employing several kinematic hypotheses. This makes it possible to discard a priori specific types of deformation modes and consequently reduce the number of cross-section degrees-of-freedom. The approach is applicable to arbitrary (with open and closed parts) polygonal cross-sections with external and internal constraints and allows for the a posteriori inclusion of particular deformation modes (e.g., shear deformation modes in a part of the cross-section). Although only GBT applications are dealtwith, the deformationmodes obtained may be straightforwardly incorporated in other thinwalled beam formulations that include cross-section deformation. © Springer-Verlag 2010.


Trademark
Unic | Date: 2015-07-23

Power-operated coffee grinders; coffee grinders, other than hand-operated; beverage preparation machines, electromechanical; coffee, tea and beverage vending machines; automatic coffee, tea and beverage vending machines. Electric coffee percolators, electric coffee machines, electric coffee brewers; electric coffee roasters, electric coffee makers; electric coffee machines for professional use; electric espresso coffee machines; steam generating installations; electric coffee percolators and electric coffee machines with hot water and steam production; coffee roasters; machines for preparing beverages by infusion or by solubilization; electric espresso machines.


Trademark
Unic | Date: 2012-12-25

Coffee grinders, other than hand operated, namely, electric and power-operated; electric emulsifying machines for percolators and cappuccino and coffee machines; dishwashers; glass washing machines. Apparatus for production of steam, namely, steam generators; steam accumulators; steam boilers other than parts of machines; hot air apparatus, namely, hot air blowers, electric hot air hand dryers, and hot-air space heating apparatus; electric coffee percolators; electric coffee machines; electric percolators and coffee makers with hot water and steam production; tips for percolators and coffee and cappuccino machines; coffee makers excluding coffee grinders; electric coffee filters, not of paper being part of electric coffee makers; coffee roasters; electric kettles; electric espresso coffee machines; machine for preparing beverages by infusion or by solubilization, namely, electric drink preparation machines. Non-electric percolators and non-electric coffee makers; non-electric percolators and coffee makers that use of hot water and steam; coffee pots, all these products being non electric and not of precious metals; hand operated coffee grinders; non-electric coffee filters, not of precious metals, not of paper being part of non-electric coffee makers; glasses for drinking; cups, not of precious metal; basins of precious metal; table plates, not of precious metal; saucers, not of precious metal; sugar bowls, not of precious metal; coffee services, not of precious metal; tea infusers of non-precious metal, tea caddies, not of precious metal; tea strainers, not of precious metal; tea services, not of precious metal; teapots, not of precious metal; tea-strainers, not of precious metal; non-electric kettles.


This report studies Projector in Global market, especially in North America, Europe, China, Japan, Korea and Taiwan, focuses on top manufacturers in global market, with production, price, revenue and market share for each manufacturer, covering  Philips  BenQ  EPSON  Sony  JMGO  UNIC  RICOH  IGOOD  Rigal  VEZ  Sharp  Casio Market Segment by Regions, this report splits Global into several key Regions, with production, consumption, revenue, market share and growth rate of Projector in these regions, from 2011 to 2021 (forecast), like  North America  Europe  China  Japan  Korea  Taiwan Split by product type, with production, revenue, price, market share and growth rate of each type, can be divided into  HDMI interface  Short focus  Wifi  Bluetooth  Others Split by application, this report focuses on consumption, market share and growth rate of Projector in each application, can be divided into  Home  Business  Others 1 Projector Market Overview  1.1 Product Overview and Scope of Projector  1.2 Projector Segment by Type  1.2.1 Global Production Market Share of Projector by Type in 2015  1.2.2 HDMI interface  1.2.3 Short focus  1.2.4 Wifi  1.2.5 Bluetooth  1.2.6 Others  1.3 Projector Segment by Application  1.3.1 Projector Consumption Market Share by Application in 2015  1.3.2 Home  1.3.3 Business  1.3.4 Others  1.4 Projector Market by Region  1.4.1 North America Status and Prospect (2011-2021)  1.4.2 Europe Status and Prospect (2011-2021)  1.4.3 China Status and Prospect (2011-2021)  1.4.4 Japan Status and Prospect (2011-2021)  1.4.5 Korea Status and Prospect (2011-2021)  1.4.6 Taiwan Status and Prospect (2011-2021)  1.5 Global Market Size (Value) of Projector (2011-2021) 2 Global Projector Market Competition by Manufacturers  2.1 Global Projector Production and Share by Manufacturers (2015 and 2016)  2.2 Global Projector Revenue and Share by Manufacturers (2015 and 2016)  2.3 Global Projector Average Price by Manufacturers (2015 and 2016)  2.4 Manufacturers Projector Manufacturing Base Distribution, Sales Area and Product Type  2.5 Projector Market Competitive Situation and Trends  2.5.1 Projector Market Concentration Rate  2.5.2 Projector Market Share of Top 3 and Top 5 Manufacturers  2.5.3 Mergers & Acquisitions, Expansion 3 Global Projector Production, Revenue (Value) by Region (2011-2016)  3.1 Global Projector Production by Region (2011-2016)  3.2 Global Projector Production Market Share by Region (2011-2016)  3.3 Global Projector Revenue (Value) and Market Share by Region (2011-2016)  3.4 Global Projector Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016)  3.5 North America Projector Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016)  3.6 Europe Projector Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016)  3.7 China Projector Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016)  3.8 Japan Projector Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016)  3.9 Korea Projector Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016)  3.10 Taiwan Projector Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016) 4 Global Projector Supply (Production), Consumption, Export, Import by Regions (2011-2016)  4.1 Global Projector Consumption by Regions (2011-2016)  4.2 North America Projector Production, Consumption, Export, Import by Regions (2011-2016)  4.3 Europe Projector Production, Consumption, Export, Import by Regions (2011-2016)  4.4 China Projector Production, Consumption, Export, Import by Regions (2011-2016)  4.5 Japan Projector Production, Consumption, Export, Import by Regions (2011-2016)  4.6 Korea Projector Production, Consumption, Export, Import by Regions (2011-2016)  4.7 Taiwan Projector Production, Consumption, Export, Import by Regions (2011-2016) 7 Global Projector Manufacturers Profiles/Analysis  7.1 Philips  7.1.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors  7.1.2 Projector Product Type, Application and Specification  7.1.2.1 Type I  7.1.2.2 Type II  7.1.3 Philips Projector Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016)  7.1.4 Main Business/Business Overview  7.2 BenQ  7.2.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors  7.2.2 Projector Product Type, Application and Specification  7.2.2.1 Type I  7.2.2.2 Type II  7.2.3 BenQ Projector Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016)  7.2.4 Main Business/Business Overview  7.3 EPSON  7.3.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors  7.3.2 Projector Product Type, Application and Specification  7.3.2.1 Type I  7.3.2.2 Type II

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