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— Synopsis In real terms, the Egyptian construction industry registered positive growth during the review period (2011–2015) and is expected to continue to expand over the forecast period (2016–2020), with investments in residential, infrastructure, and energy and utilities construction projects. Forecast-period growth will be driven by government efforts to develop the country’s rail and road infrastructure and meet its energy targets by 2022. The growing number of public-private partnership (PPP) projects and the increasing pace of foreign investment will also drive industry growth over the forecast period. In July 2016, the government signed 20 economic agreements with the Chinese government. The agreements, worth EGP111.7 billion (US$15.0 billion), will include investments in the country’s housing, transport and energy sectors. Government flagship programs such as the October Oasis, Sustainable Development Strategy 2030, Local Development for Upper Egypt governorates and development of Cairo Metro Line 6 projects, are expected to support industry growth over the forecast period. In real terms, the industry’s output value recorded a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 5.32% during the review period, and is expected to register a forecast-period CAGR of 8.24%. Summary Construction in Egypt – Key Trends and Opportunities to 2020 report provides detailed market analysis, information and insights into the Egyptian construction industry including: • The Egyptian construction industry's growth prospects by market, project type and construction activity • Analysis of equipment, material and service costs for each project type in Egypt • Critical insight into the impact of industry trends and issues, and the risks and opportunities they present to participants in the Egyptian construction industry • Profiles of the leading operators in the Egyptian construction industry • Data highlights of the largest construction projects in Egypt Scope This report provides a comprehensive analysis of the construction industry in Egypt. It provides: • Historical (2011-2015) and forecast (2016-2020) valuations of the construction industry in Egypt using construction output and value-add methods • Segmentation by sector (commercial, industrial, infrastructure, energy and utilities, institutional and residential) and by project type • Breakdown of values within each project type, by type of activity (new construction, repair and maintenance, refurbishment and demolition) and by type of cost (materials, equipment and services) • Analysis of key construction industry issues, including regulation, cost management, funding and pricing • Detailed profiles of the leading construction companies in Egypt Reasons to Buy • Identify and evaluate market opportunities using Timetric's standardized valuation and forecasting methodologies. • Assess market growth potential at a micro-level with over 600 time-series data forecasts. • Understand the latest industry and market trends. • Formulate and validate strategy using Timetric's critical and actionable insight. • Assess business risks, including cost, regulatory and competitive pressures. • Evaluate competitive risk and success factors. Key Highlights • In March 2015, the government announced plans to build a new capital city to the east of Cairo near the Red Sea, in an aim to promote economic growth. The project was suspended temporarily following lack of consensus on the project’s tenure and cost. However, the government re-announced the commencement of the project in February 2016. The new capital city will include 1.1 million housing units, 663 healthcare facilities, 700 kindergartens, 40,000 hotel rooms, 1,250 religious buildings, and retail malls on a 1.8 million m2 area, theme parks and an airport. • Egypt’s strategic geographical location and availability of cheap and competitive workforce is increasing the pace of foreign direct investment (FDI) in the country. According to the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD)’s 2015 World Investment Report, the oil sector represented the highest recipient of FDI with a share of 71.7% during 2014–2015, followed by the construction and manufacturing sectors with 2.2% and 2.0% shares respectively. • In a bid to minimize traffic congestion in Cairo, the Egyptian Ministry of Transport announced plans to construct Cairo Metro Line 6. Accordingly, the Ministry of Transport signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with the China Railway Construction Corporation worth EGP26.1 billion (US$3.5 billion) in December 2015. The 30km-long metro line project will connect northern Al-Khosos and the southern suburb of Maadi. • In 2015, the government signed a MoU with Rosatom State Atomic Energy Corporation of Russia to construct a nuclear power station in El Dabaa region. With a total investment of EGP186.2 billion (US$25.0 billion), the plant will be developed with a capacity to generate 4,800MW of electricity. The plant is expected to be completed in 2022. • The government is accelerating the pace of investment under the public-private partnership (PPP) model. In February 2016, the Egyptian Ministry of Housing signed four PPP contracts with major real estate companies which include Mountain View-Sisban Holding alliance, Arabia Group and Palm Hills. The total value of these PPP projects is EGP200.0 billion (US$26.8 billion) and includes developments such as the Mountain View iCity residential project in the New Cairo city which will cover a 2.1km2 area with 18,000 housing units, and a resort. For more information, please visit http://www.wiseguyreports.com


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.fao.org

The 14th session of the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) met in Nairobi, Kenya 17-20 July 2016. During this Conference, FAO and UNCTAD issued a joint statement from Nairobi on the need to address harmful fisheries subsidies under SDG 14.6 of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.  This joint statement highlights that a positive negotiation outcome in the WTO subsidies negotiations will improve international efforts to address many of the negative impacts of fisheries subsidies. Furthermore, FAO and UNCTAD will reinforce their readiness to provide capacity building and technical assistance to contribute to member countries' efforts to achieve targets under SDG 14, specifically target 14.6. Joint statement text


News Article | May 6, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) co-hosted a United Nations-supported international conference recently on the challenges and opportunities of ocean and coastal sustainable development under the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (UNSDG) Agenda. Held on the campus of PolyU, the “Healthy Oceans – Healthy Coast” International Leadership Conference on 25-26 April 2017 was attended by around forty experts from the United Nations and related government and non-government representatives from overseas and the Chinese mainland. The discussion focused on UNSDG which provides guidelines and targets for all countries to adopt and achieve in accordance with their own priorities and the environmental challenges of the world at large. The Conference was supported by the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), an authoritative knowledge-based institution, to help shape current policy debates and development strategies, with a particular focus on ensuring that domestic policies and international action are mutually supportive in bringing about sustainable development. Other lead organisers were the International Ocean Institute and Shenzhen World Health Foundation. Faculty and graduate students from PolyU’s Department of Logistics and Maritime Studies and Research Institute for Sustainable Urban Development shared their research work on green shipping and high-density coastal development. PolyU’s Vice President (Student and Global Affairs), Professor Angelina Yuen, said, “PolyU has always been committed to the sustainable development of the community. We are honoured to have taken part in and contributed ideas to the global discussion on issues relating to the oceans. With concerted efforts, I am confident that together we can make progress on this important global challenge.” The conference concluded with the drafting of a summary document which will be shared at the upcoming United Nations Oceans Conference co-hosted by the Governments of Fiji and Sweden at the UN Headquarters in New York on 5-9 June 2017 to support the implementation of Sustainable Development Goal 14: Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development.


News Article | May 5, 2017
Site: www.ictsd.org

Fisheries Subsidies in the Spotlight Ahead of UN Ocean Conference Preparations are underway for the high-level UN Conference to Support the Implementation of Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 14, co-hosted by the governments of Fiji and Sweden and set to coincide with World Oceans Day 2017 in June. The 5-9 June event will be the first SDG-specific conference held by the UN since its adoption of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development Goals in 2015. It is also known as the UN Ocean Conference. (See Bridges Weekly, 1 October 2015) “When we talk about SDG 14, we are thinking about navigation in the sea, we think about catching fish in the sea for food, we are thinking about doing tourism, but that is not all. Health of the sea and sustainable use of marine resources have a direct impact in the implementation of the many SDGs,” said Wu Hongbo, UN Under-Secretary-General and head of the Department of Economic and Social Affairs (DESA) during an initial preparatory meeting. UN member states, intergovernmental organisations, and other entities will convene in New York for the week-long event to reaffirm their commitments to SDG 14 and its objectives: to “conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas, and marine resources for sustainable development.” Oceans absorb one-third of greenhouse gas emissions produced by humans and are vital to poverty eradication, food security and nutrition, and climate change mitigation. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), ocean-based economies assure the livelihoods of 10-12 percent of the world’s population. Overall, the Ocean Conference aims to respond to declines in ocean health from marine pollution and ocean acidification and to develop solutions that offset the negative effects of overfishing, the overcapacity of fisheries, and the use of fisheries subsidies. Projected outcomes from the Ocean Conference include the adoption of the intergovernmental declaration titled “Our Oceans, Our Future: Call for Action” by consensus. Negotiations over drafts of the “Call for Action” are ongoing, with a revised version of the text having undergone its second round of consultations last week. The latest draft, which is dated 7 April, stresses that measures to implement SDG 14 “should build upon… reinforce and not duplicate or undermine, existing legal instruments” in line with the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea, such as the Port State Measures Agreement to Prevent, Deter and Eliminate Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated Fishing (PSMA). The PSMA was adopted by 29 countries and the European Union in 2016 and has now entered into force. (See Bridges Weekly, 25 May 2016) In addition to the “Call for Action,” co-chairs will compile a report summarising the seven partnership dialogues scheduled and a list of voluntary commitments meant to facilitate the implementation of SDG 14. So far, 103 voluntary commitments from stakeholders, UN bodies, and governments have been received, which outline different projects to protect marine ecosystems in coastal zones like Grenada and Bali and efforts to increase ocean conservation philanthropy. The Ocean Conference preparations have also included meetings on trade, and language on the subject is also featured in the “zero draft” that is under discussion. In late March, the UN Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), FAO, and the African, Caribbean, and Pacific Group of States (ACP) co-organised an Oceans Forum focused on the regulatory and policy implications of Goal 14’s trade-related targets. These targets include an end to illegal, unregulated, and unreported (IUU) fishing, overfishing, and other destructive fishing practices (SDG 14.4) and the prohibition of fisheries subsidies that contribute to overcapacity and overfishing, with an emphasis on the elimination of those related to IUU fishing activities (SDG 14.6) by 2020. (See Bridges Weekly, 22 September 2016) Some estimates place global fisheries subsidies at US$35 billion annually, with 60 percent of this amount allocated to capacity-enhancing subsidies. Experts say that this type of subsidy allows fleets to intensify and broaden the scope of their fishing in a way that depletes fish stocks and promotes other destructive practices. Participants also discussed SDG 14.b and its call for increased access to markets and marine resources for small-scale artisanal fishers during the Oceans Forum. This especially important demographic accounts for 86 percent of fishermen employed worldwide. Of those employed in small-scale fisheries, half are women. The UN efforts come at a time when World Trade Organization (WTO) members are actively looking at options for disciplining harmful fisheries subsidies and improving transparency on the subject, in the hopes of reaching an agreed outcome by year’s end. Given this context, Luis Enrique Chávez Basagoitia, who chaired the Oceans Forum and is Peru’s Permanent Representative in Geneva, emphasised the need to identify all WTO instruments valuable to the achievement of Goal 14. In his concluding report on the Oceans Forum on 20 April, the chairman spoke extensively about the health of the blue economy in relation to fisheries subsidies. “There is an undeniable nexus between the extraction of fisheries resources and conservation and trade. Thus, the opportunity cost of not acting to address harmful fishing subsidies is extremely high. Without action we will deplete the resource, create food insecurity, and destroy the same sources of employment we aim to preserve,” he said. The results of the discussions will be conveyed to the UN and WTO processes in anticipation of both the Ocean Conference and the Eleventh WTO Ministerial Conference (MC11) to be held in Buenos Aires, Argentina, from 11-14 December. The Ocean Conference will be the last major UN gathering before MC11 on the trade-related aspects of fisheries, and especially international responses to fisheries subsidies. While the WTO is a different forum from the UN, negotiators at the global trade body have broadly referred to the momentum from the SDG process – including the 2020 target on tackling fisheries subsidies – as a strong driver behind their current efforts. Within this context, talks on possible disciplines on fisheries subsidies continue within the WTO’s negotiating group on rules, with an informal meeting held in Geneva on 2 May. A subsequent “cluster” of meetings is planned from 15-17 May, which sources say will look more closely at a new proposal tabled by New Zealand, Iceland, and Pakistan on the implementation of SDG 14.6. Other topics for that cluster of WTO meetings include the scope of potential fisheries subsidies disciplines, along with accounting for the special needs of developing economies and any technical assistance or capacity building required. Future meetings will also be held in “clusters” to discuss topics such as transparency, implementation, dispute settlement, and related topics, though the dates for those have not yet been finalised. ICTSD reporting. This article first appeared in Bridges Weekly, 4 May 2017.


News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

According to United Nations Conference on Trade & Development (UNCTAD), global seaborne trade in 2014 expanded by 3.4% when compared to 2013. High reliability and alternative use as an auxiliary engine will further propel the business landscape. Rise in investment towards shipbuilding sector coupled with increasing research and development towards environment friendly technology will stimulate the U.S. marine diesel engines market size. In 2015, the U.S. shipbuilding industry contributed over USD 37.3 billion in the country's GDP. However, introduction of emission norms by MARPOL and IMO may act as industry restraint. Request for a sample of this research report @ https://www.gminsights.com/request-sample/detail/158 Optimum utilization of fuel coupled with cost affordability will enhance marine diesel engines market share. Decline in crude oil price with a positive outlook toward shipbuilding industry may further stimulate the product demand. Major shipbuilding hubs including China and South Korea have witnessed an upsurge in the demand for these products owing to easy fuel availability and affordable pricing. High speed systems in 2016 accounted for over 20% of marine diesel engines market share. Healthy orderbook toward construction of navy vessels, tugboats and freight carriers will further complement the industry outlook. Growing demand for cruise and ferries owing to improvement in standard of living coupled with rise in disposable income will boost the medium speed diesel engines market. Recreational vessels account for a large share of the medium speed products. In 2016, MAN D&T signed an agreement with Star Cruise to supply two medium size engines for their cruise ships. Offshore in 2016 accounted for over 18% of the marine diesel engines market. Increasing shale exploration and production in offshore areas will enhance the demand for offshore support vessels including drill ships, FPSO and rigs. Growing demand for tanker and container vessels, bulk and gas carriers used for transportation of natural gas and other cargos will propel the merchant marine diesel engine market. According to Eurostat's in 2015, the ports of Germany handled over 126 million tons of container cargo. Browse key industry insights spread across 250 pages with 228 market data tables & 9 figures & charts from this 2017 report Marine Diesel Engines Market in detail along with the table of contents at: Increasing governmental expenditure towards strengthening naval forces will fuel the navy marine diesel engines market. Russia has laid down its ambitious plan to increase its military support fleet by building more than 60 ships including aircraft carriers and submarines by 2020. In 2016, Germany marine diesel engines market was valued over USD 150 million. Growing government initiatives and strategies including National Master Plan for Marine Technology (NMMT) will positively impact the industry size. According to NMMT, the revenue from shipbuilding industry in 2015 was USD 19.9 billion and is projected to reach USD 25.48 billion by 2018. China marine diesel engines market will witness strong growth owing to increasing number of shipbuilding companies coupled with rising investment towards manufacturing ecologically safe diesel engines. In 2014, the Government of China issued a financial stimulus package which has facilitated the money stock. Fast reduction in interest rates of short-term instruments created profitable financing prospects for the shipbuilding industry. The China State Shipbuilding Corporation (CSSC) successfully issued bonds worth over USD 700 million with a 4.6% annual rate of return, significantly reducing financing costs. Key players in the marine diesel engines market include Wartsila, NYK Line, Man D&T, Mitsui OSK Lines, Kawasaki Kisen Kaisha, COSCO, CMA CGM Holding, China Shipping Development, Teekay and A.P. Møller-Maersk. Make an inquiry for purchasing this report @ https://www.gminsights.com/inquiry-before-buying/158 Marine Propulsion Engine Market size was over USD 9 billion in 2015, and is anticipated to grow at 4.3% CAGR from 2016 to 2024. Use of renewable energy sources such as solar and wind energy to meet auxiliary power requirements will increase, thereby augmenting industry growth. Automotive Aftermarket Size was valued at over USD 450 billion in 2015, increasing at CAGR over 4.5% from 2016 to 2024. Strong automotive outlook coupled with surge in manufacturing of auto components will drive the automotive aftermarket industry demand by 2024. Global Market Insights, Inc., headquartered in Delaware, U.S., is a global market research and consulting service provider; offering syndicated and custom research reports along with growth consulting services. Our business intelligence and industry research reports offer clients with penetrative insights and actionable market data specially designed and presented to aid strategic decision making. These exhaustive reports are designed via a proprietary research methodology and are available for key industries such as chemicals, advanced materials, technology, renewable energy and biotechnology.


News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

According to United Nations Conference on Trade & Development (UNCTAD), global seaborne trade in 2014 expanded by 3.4% when compared to 2013. High reliability and alternative use as an auxiliary engine will further propel the business landscape. Rise in investment towards shipbuilding sector coupled with increasing research and development towards environment friendly technology will stimulate the U.S. marine diesel engines market size. In 2015, the U.S. shipbuilding industry contributed over USD 37.3 billion in the country's GDP. However, introduction of emission norms by MARPOL and IMO may act as industry restraint. Request for a sample of this research report @ https://www.gminsights.com/request-sample/detail/158 Optimum utilization of fuel coupled with cost affordability will enhance marine diesel engines market share. Decline in crude oil price with a positive outlook toward shipbuilding industry may further stimulate the product demand. Major shipbuilding hubs including China and South Korea have witnessed an upsurge in the demand for these products owing to easy fuel availability and affordable pricing. High speed systems in 2016 accounted for over 20% of marine diesel engines market share. Healthy orderbook toward construction of navy vessels, tugboats and freight carriers will further complement the industry outlook. Growing demand for cruise and ferries owing to improvement in standard of living coupled with rise in disposable income will boost the medium speed diesel engines market. Recreational vessels account for a large share of the medium speed products. In 2016, MAN D&T signed an agreement with Star Cruise to supply two medium size engines for their cruise ships. Offshore in 2016 accounted for over 18% of the marine diesel engines market. Increasing shale exploration and production in offshore areas will enhance the demand for offshore support vessels including drill ships, FPSO and rigs. Growing demand for tanker and container vessels, bulk and gas carriers used for transportation of natural gas and other cargos will propel the merchant marine diesel engine market. According to Eurostat's in 2015, the ports of Germany handled over 126 million tons of container cargo. Browse key industry insights spread across 250 pages with 228 market data tables & 9 figures & charts from this 2017 report Marine Diesel Engines Market in detail along with the table of contents at: Increasing governmental expenditure towards strengthening naval forces will fuel the navy marine diesel engines market. Russia has laid down its ambitious plan to increase its military support fleet by building more than 60 ships including aircraft carriers and submarines by 2020. In 2016, Germany marine diesel engines market was valued over USD 150 million. Growing government initiatives and strategies including National Master Plan for Marine Technology (NMMT) will positively impact the industry size. According to NMMT, the revenue from shipbuilding industry in 2015 was USD 19.9 billion and is projected to reach USD 25.48 billion by 2018. China marine diesel engines market will witness strong growth owing to increasing number of shipbuilding companies coupled with rising investment towards manufacturing ecologically safe diesel engines. In 2014, the Government of China issued a financial stimulus package which has facilitated the money stock. Fast reduction in interest rates of short-term instruments created profitable financing prospects for the shipbuilding industry. The China State Shipbuilding Corporation (CSSC) successfully issued bonds worth over USD 700 million with a 4.6% annual rate of return, significantly reducing financing costs. Key players in the marine diesel engines market include Wartsila, NYK Line, Man D&T, Mitsui OSK Lines, Kawasaki Kisen Kaisha, COSCO, CMA CGM Holding, China Shipping Development, Teekay and A.P. Møller-Maersk. Make an inquiry for purchasing this report @ https://www.gminsights.com/inquiry-before-buying/158 Marine Propulsion Engine Market size was over USD 9 billion in 2015, and is anticipated to grow at 4.3% CAGR from 2016 to 2024. Use of renewable energy sources such as solar and wind energy to meet auxiliary power requirements will increase, thereby augmenting industry growth. Automotive Aftermarket Size was valued at over USD 450 billion in 2015, increasing at CAGR over 4.5% from 2016 to 2024. Strong automotive outlook coupled with surge in manufacturing of auto components will drive the automotive aftermarket industry demand by 2024. Global Market Insights, Inc., headquartered in Delaware, U.S., is a global market research and consulting service provider; offering syndicated and custom research reports along with growth consulting services. Our business intelligence and industry research reports offer clients with penetrative insights and actionable market data specially designed and presented to aid strategic decision making. These exhaustive reports are designed via a proprietary research methodology and are available for key industries such as chemicals, advanced materials, technology, renewable energy and biotechnology.


News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: www.ictsd.org

WEBCAST: TALKING DISPUTES | THE RUSSIA – EU (PIGS) DISPUTE. Published by the International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development (ICTSD). This video shows the discussions which took place on the Russia – EU (Pigs) WTO dispute during a 19 May event co-hosted by ICTSD and WTI Advisors. The video is available in full here. INVESTOR-STATE DISPUTE SETTLEMENT: REVIEW OF DEVELOPMENTS IN 2016. Published by the UN Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) (May 2017). This latest edition of UNCTAD’s issues note on international investment arbitration examines the various cases and decisions issued in this field over the year 2016.  The full issues note is available for download at the UNCTAD website. 2020 PROJECTIONS OF CLIMATE FINANCE TOWARDS THE USD 100 BILLION GOAL. Published by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) (22 May 2017). This new publication aims to support the efforts underway by developing economies to meet their goal of mobilising US$100 billion in climate finance by the end of this decade for developing countries. To access the publication, please visit the OECD’s iLibrary. THE PAYOFF TO AMERICA FROM GLOBALIZATION: A FRESH LOOK WITH A FOCUS ON COSTS TO WORKERS. By Gary Clyde Hufbauer and Zhiyao Lu for the Peterson Institute for International Economics (PIIE) (May 2017). This policy brief calculates the gains for the United States from trade expansion during the period of 1950-2016, estimating these to be approximately US$2.1 trillion. The authors call for increased liberalisation in trade and improved programmes for displaced workers. To download the full document, please visit PIIE website. LEVERAGING GLOBAL PRODUCTION NETWORKS. By the Asian Development Bank (ADB) (May 2017). This study examines the potential gains for India’s new economic corridors in relation to global value chains and production networks, with the authors reviewing India’s case relative to other economies. To download this study, please visit the ADB website. AS TRUMP WEIGHS PARIS CLIMATE AGREEMENT 6 WAYS THE WORLD HAS CHANGED. By Nathan Hultman for the Brookings Institution (May 2017). This op-ed presents six key shifts in climate change in recent decades, presenting these as issues for the Trump Administration to consider as they weigh their approach to the UN’s Paris Agreement on climate change. Hultman argues that the Paris Agreement has the best structure that could be achieved while balancing international action and national needs. To view this op-ed, please visit the Brookings Institution website. STAYING CONNECTED: KEY ELEMENTS FOR UK-EU27 ENERGY COOPERATION AFER BREXIT. By Anthony Froggatt, Georgina Wright, and Matthew Lockwood for Chatham House (May 2017). This paper examines future energy policy negotiations between the UK and EU27 post-Brexit, including where the two sides may be able to reach convergence. The authors further argue in favour of establishing a new pan-European energy partnership. To download this paper, please visit the Chatham House website.


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.ictsd.org

ADB ANNUAL REPORT 2016. Published by the Asian Development Bank (ADB) (April 2017). This annual report reviews the economic developments seen in the Asia-Pacific region over the past half-century, including in relation to the ADB. The report examines ADB’s own performance in this context, both in quantitative and qualitative terms.  To download the full report, please visit the ADB website. 2017 STATE OF THE EU ETS REPORT. By Andrei Marcu, Emilie Alberola, Jean-Yves Caneill, Matteo Mazzoni, Stefan P. Schleicher, Wijnand Stoefs, and Charlotte Vailles for the International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development (ICTSD) (May2017). This report focuses on the EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) and aims to provide an independent contribution to the policy debate surrounding its current functionality and effectiveness. To download this report, please visit the ICTSD website. OECD SKILLS OUTLOOK 2017: SKILLS AND GLOBAL VALUE CHAINS. Published by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) (May 2017). This report analyses how prioritising skills development can yield social and economic gains for countries, with the publication reviewing skills-related policies in education, employment protection, migration, trade, and innovation policies. To download the full report please visit the OCED website. 20 YEARS OF BIOTRADE: CONNECTING PEOPLE, THE PLANET, AND MARKETS. Published by the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) (May 2017). This report focuses on the experiences, lessons, and successes shared by practitioners of the BioTrade Initiative, launched by UNCTAD in 1996. In addition, this publication looks BioTrade’s potential future role, including with regards to supporting the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). To download this report, please visit the UNCTAD website. ADVANCING SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT THROUGH SERVICES REGULATION. Published by the International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development (ICTSD) (May 2017). This paper argues that appropriate regulatory changes in services could have significant benefits in terms of sustainable development, including in supporting greater female participation across all economic sectors and helping small companies become more competitive. To download this paper, please visit the ICTSD website. VIEWS ON MITIGATION VALUE AND ITS APPLICATION. By Andrei Marcu for the International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development (ICTSD) (May 2017). This paper looks at carbon markets, specifically regarding the relationship between the mitigation, compliance, and financial values of units in carbon trading systems. The author argues that understanding these concepts in greater depth can help support the development of carbon market clubs, among other initiatives. To download this paper, please visit the ICTSD website. ISSUES FOR DISCUSSION TO OPERATIONALISE ARTICLE 6 OF THE PARIS AGREEMENT. By Andrei Marcu for the International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development (ICTSD) (May 2017). This report focuses on how to make Article 6 of the Paris Agreement operational. Specifically, the author delves into a list of questions and issues that negotiations need to resolve before moving forward. To download this paper, please visit the ICTSD website.


News Article | March 4, 2016
Site: www.renewableenergyworld.com

In Switzerland, UNCTAD has released its first report on the state of biofuel technologies since 2007 and unveiled 5 five recommendations “for the responsible development of the second-generation biofuels industry.”


News Article | November 10, 2016
Site: techcrunch.com

For Americans struggling with stagnant wages, under- or un-employment, one of Donald Trump’s most appealing campaign promises was to bring manufacturing jobs back to the U.S. Navigating the complexities of policy, tariffs and geopolitics would make that hard enough already for the president elect. But technology will make this promise nearly impossible to fulfill. Why? Because manufacturing jobs are increasingly done by robots, not people. Robotics have already helped reduce reliance on labor overseas for manufacturers in automotive, electrical and electronics industries, according to a fresh policy report from the United Nations Conference on Trade & Development. And automation does allow manufacturers to do business in the U.S. when they may have chosen to do it in Southeast Asia or somewhere else, before. But when manufacturing returns to the states, jobs aren’t coming with it in high numbers. Automation has left workers in developing nations without employment, the report notes, and the U.S. faces the same prospect. Startups creating interesting robotics that stand to “steal” jobs from people, either here or abroad, are attracting seed and venture funding. Players in this space include burger flipping and pizza making robots, respectively, from Momentum Machines and Zume, painting robots from Rational Robotics. Then there are the likes of Modbot and Baxter, robots configurable for a wide range of purposes in manufacturing and elsewhere. It’s not just startups, though. Large brands like Nike and Adidas have shed contractors and embraced robotics and 3-D printing to make their shoes. Large farms have long employed robots in the field, and major companies like Amazon and UPS rely heavily on robots for logistics and warehousing. UNCTAD’s report explained, “increased use of robots in developed countries erodes traditional labor-cost advantage of developing countries,” and is already having a global impact. It’s not just that robots ramp up productivity. They can help companies streamline all kinds of headaches affiliated with setting up shop overseas. A manufacturer outsourcing to vendors or hiring employees across borders will have to deal with the costs of managing people, design, quality, safety, customs and logistics, regulatory compliance and intellectual property from afar. “Reshoring” becomes more appealing with every technological advance in robots, since it reduces administrative and legal overhead as well as labor costs. And robots aren’t getting dumber, obviously. Advances in computer vision and artificial intelligence promise to make robots, and the software-brains inside of them, even more competitive with people, especially in manufacturing but even in physical security or hospitality. Yes, robot cashiers, assistants, security guards and flight attendants are a thing. Let’s just hope there’s always a market for “handmade” goods and human-delivered services, and perhaps a robot that can help teach former employees new work skills.

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