Entity

Time filter

Source Type


Cordova A.,CNRS Physiology of Reproduction and Behaviors | Perreau C.,CNRS Physiology of Reproduction and Behaviors | Schmaltz-Panneau B.,French National Institute for Agricultural Research | Locatelli Y.,CNRS Physiology of Reproduction and Behaviors | And 3 more authors.
Gynecologie Obstetrique Fertilite | Year: 2013

Beyond being a pipe between ovary and uterus, the oviduct is an active player in different aspects of early reproductive processes, in particular in the transport of embryos to the site of implantation and the regulation of its early development. Different studies evidenced a communication between oviduct and early embryo at the molecular and functional levels. Since the study of these interactions is difficult in vivo, different in vitro systems have been developed to mimic the maternal milieu during early development. These systems allowed to confirm the action of the cells on the quality of early development (blastocyst rate and viability). In turn, the embryos are producing signals that are able to modify and adapt the activity of maternal cells. © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. Source


Colombani C.,French National Institute for Agricultural Research | Legarra A.,French National Institute for Agricultural Research | Fritz S.,Union Nationale des Cooperatives dElevage et dInsemination Animale UNCEIA | Guillaume F.,Institute Of Lelevage | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Dairy Science | Year: 2013

Recently, the amount of available single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) marker data has considerably increased in dairy cattle breeds, both for research purposes and for application in commercial breeding and selection programs. Bayesian methods are currently used in the genomic evaluation of dairy cattle to handle very large sets of explanatory variables with a limited number of observations. In this study, we applied 2 Bayesian methods, BayesCπ and Bayesian least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO), to 2 genotyped and phenotyped reference populations consisting of 3,940 Holstein bulls and 1,172 Montbéliarde bulls with approximately 40,000 polymorphic SNP. We compared the accuracy of the Bayesian methods for the prediction of 3 traits (milk yield, fat content, and conception rate) with pedigree-based BLUP, genomic BLUP, partial least squares (PLS) regression, and sparse PLS regression, a variable selection PLS variant. The results showed that the correlations between observed and predicted phenotypes were similar in BayesCπ (including or not pedigree information) and Bayesian LASSO for most of the traits and whatever the breed. In the Holstein breed, Bayesian methods led to higher correlations than other approaches for fat content and were similar to genomic BLUP for milk yield and to genomic BLUP and PLS regression for the conception rate. In the Montbéliarde breed, no method dominated the others, except BayesCπ for fat content. The better performances of the Bayesian methods for fat content in Holstein and Montbéliarde breeds are probably due to the effect of the DGAT1 gene. The SNP identified by the BayesCπ, Bayesian LASSO, and sparse PLS regression methods, based on their effect on the different traits of interest, were located at almost the same position on the genome. As the Bayesian methods resulted in regressions of direct genomic values on daughter trait deviations closer to 1 than for the other methods tested in this study, Bayesian methods are suggested for genomic evaluations of French dairy cattle. © 2013 American Dairy Science Association. Source


Cordova A.,CNRS Physiology of Reproduction and Behaviors | Perreau C.,CNRS Physiology of Reproduction and Behaviors | Uzbekova S.,CNRS Physiology of Reproduction and Behaviors | Ponsart C.,Union Nationale des Cooperatives dElevage et dInsemination Animale UNCEIA | And 3 more authors.
Theriogenology | Year: 2014

The use of somatic cells for coculture with embryos has been amply investigated to study embryo maternal interactions. The use of bovine oviduct epithelial cells (BOEC) has been shown to improve the blastocyst rate and quality, affecting their gene expression profile. In this study, we evaluated different timings of BOEC coculture for the development of in-vitro-produced embryos and their effects on blastocysts rate and mRNA abundance of some genes that are important for embryo development. Our results confirmed the positive effects of BOEC on early development of bovine embryos. The presence of the cells during the first four days or during the last four days of development was enough to produce the full BOEC effect. When the presence of BOEC was restricted to the four first days, the kinetics of blastocyst development was accelerated, with significantly more blastocysts at Days 6 and 7 than when the cells were present all along the culture or only during the last four days. Older cells used at early stage were not active anymore. Using young cells at late stage did not improve the cell effect, compared with the older ones. Therefore, the lower effect of BOEC at late stage, compared with early period, may not be explained by cell aging. In addition, the presence of BOEC, at early or late stages, induced changes in the embryos expression profile of genes known to be related to embryo quality, suggesting reduced apoptosis and increased capacity to struggle against oxidative stress after coculture. In conclusion, we confirmed the effect of BOEC on the rate and quality of bovine IVP embryos development. We found for the first time that the presence of BOEC during the four first days of the 8-days development is enough to produce these effects. These first four days represent the period of the presence of the embryos in the oviduct in vivo, highlighting the physiological relevance of this in vitro model of coculture. In addition, we found that the presence of BOEC at early stages of development induced modification of transcription profile in the blastocyst, four days later, suggesting an epigenetic regulation induced by BOEC in growing embryos. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. Source


Dassonneville R.,French National Institute for Agricultural Research | Dassonneville R.,Institute Of Lelevage | Brondum R.F.,University of Aarhus | Druet T.,University of Liege | And 7 more authors.
Journal of Dairy Science | Year: 2011

The purpose of this study was to investigate the imputation error and loss of reliability of direct genomic values (DGV) or genomically enhanced breeding values (GEBV) when using genotypes imputed from a 3,000-marker single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) panel to a 50,000-marker SNP panel. Data consisted of genotypes of 15,966 European Holstein bulls from the combined EuroGenomics reference population. Genotypes with the low-density chip were created by erasing markers from 50,000-marker data. The studies were performed in the Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, and Sweden) using a BLUP model for prediction of DGV and in France using a genomic marker-assisted selection approach for prediction of GEBV. Imputation in both studies was done using a combination of the DAGPHASE 1.1 and Beagle 2.1.3 software. Traits considered were protein yield, fertility, somatic cell count, and udder depth. Imputation of missing markers and prediction of breeding values were performed using 2 different reference populations in each country: either a national reference population or a combined EuroGenomics reference population. Validation for accuracy of imputation and genomic prediction was done based on national test data. Mean imputation error rates when using national reference animals was 5.5 and 3.9% in the Nordic countries and France, respectively, whereas imputation based on the EuroGenomics reference data set gave mean error rates of 4.0 and 2.1%, respectively. Prediction of GEBV based on genotypes imputed with a national reference data set gave an absolute loss of 0.05 in mean reliability of GEBV in the French study, whereas a loss of 0.03 was obtained for reliability of DGV in the Nordic study. When genotypes were imputed using the EuroGenomics reference, a loss of 0.02 in mean reliability of GEBV was detected in the French study, and a loss of 0.06 was observed for the mean reliability of DGV in the Nordic study. Consequently, the reliability of DGV using the imputed SNP data was 0.38 based on national reference data, and 0.48 based on EuroGenomics reference data in the Nordic validation, and the reliability of GEBV using the imputed SNP data was 0.41 based on national reference data, and 0.44 based on EuroGenomics reference data in the French validation. © 2011 American Dairy Science Association. Source

Discover hidden collaborations