Jouet-sur-l'Aubois, France
Jouet-sur-l'Aubois, France

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Ponsart C.,UNCEIA Research and Development | Le Bourhis D.,UNCEIA Research and Development | Knijn H.,Crv Inc. | Fritz S.,French National Institute for Agricultural Research | And 7 more authors.
Reproduction, Fertility and Development | Year: 2014

Genomic tools are now available for most livestock species and are used routinely for genomic selection (GS) in cattle. One of the most important developments resulting from the introduction of genomic testing for dairy cattle is the application of reasonably priced low-density single nucleotide polymorphism technology in the selection of females. In this context, combining genome testing and reproductive biotechnologies in young heifers enables new strategies to generate replacement and elite females in a given period of time. Moreover, multiple markers have been detected in biopsies of preimplantation stage embryos, thus paving the way to develop new strategies based on preimplantation diagnosis and the genetic screening of embryos. Based on recent advances in GS, the present review focuses on new possibilities inherent in reproductive technologies used for commercial purposes and in genetic schemes, possible side effects and beneficial impacts on reproductive efficiency. A particular focus is on the different steps allowing embryo genotyping, including embryo micromanipulation, DNA production and quality assessment. © IETS 2014.


Hocquette J.-F.,French National Institute for Agricultural Research | Hocquette J.-F.,VetAgro Sup | Capel C.,Institute Of Lelevage | David V.,Institute Of Lelevage | And 11 more authors.
Animal Science Journal | Year: 2012

Providing phenotypic information, which is accurate, reliable, repeatable and comparable across countries or laboratories, is critical to gain a better understanding of the relationship between genes and phenotypes. So far, it is indeed extremely difficult to combine different sources of phenotypic data from multiple origins, partly because of the variability in the methods of phenotyping. The phenotyping program of livestock involves the definition of complex phenotypes obtained from data integration at different levels (from molecules to herds), the implementation of the latest technologies to accurately characterize at high speed and low cost, the greatest number of animals in a better characterized environment, and the development and sharing of large databases for data analysis and modeling. Such a program also involves the construction of a coordinated network of research and professional facilities and a common language with shared definition of unambiguous animal traits and of methods to assess them. To this end, it will build on the 'Animal Trait Ontology of Livestock' (ATOL) project with the objective of defining precisely the phenotypes of interest for farm animals. Then, it will be necessary to combine an environmental information system related to animal husbandry and associated methods to capture the phenotypic differences between animals. © 2012 The Authors. Animal Science Journal © 2012 Japanese Society of Animal Science.


PubMed | UNCEIA Research and Development
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Reproduction, fertility, and development | Year: 2013

Genomic tools are now available for most livestock species and are used routinely for genomic selection (GS) in cattle. One of the most important developments resulting from the introduction of genomic testing for dairy cattle is the application of reasonably priced low-density single nucleotide polymorphism technology in the selection of females. In this context, combining genome testing and reproductive biotechnologies in young heifers enables new strategies to generate replacement and elite females in a given period of time. Moreover, multiple markers have been detected in biopsies of preimplantation stage embryos, thus paving the way to develop new strategies based on preimplantation diagnosis and the genetic screening of embryos. Based on recent advances in GS, the present review focuses on new possibilities inherent in reproductive technologies used for commercial purposes and in genetic schemes, possible side effects and beneficial impacts on reproductive efficiency. A particular focus is on the different steps allowing embryo genotyping, including embryo micromanipulation, DNA production and quality assessment.

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