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STAMFORD, CT--(Marketwired - November 02, 2016) - Protegrity, the leading provider of data-centric enterprise data security solutions, announced today that Shelley Westman has joined the company as Senior Vice President of Alliances & Field Operations, reporting to Protegrity CEO Suni Munshani. Westman comes to Protegrity from IBM's Security Business Unit, where she was a Vice President responsible for overall operations and strategic integration initiatives. In this role she also led University Programs for IBM Security and was involved in several IBM boards and committees related to hiring and skills development. She also founded WISE -- Women in Security Excelling, a group within IBM aimed at fostering more women to participate in cybersecurity, one of the technology industry's fastest growing fields. Some of Westman's previous roles included Vice President, Security Growth Initiatives, IBM Global Technology Services (GTS); Vice President, Strategy, IBM Systems and Technology Group (STG); and Vice President and BLE, Security, IBM STG. Prior to joining IBM in 1999, Westman practiced law in Raleigh for five years. Shelley earned a J.D., with honors, from the University of North Carolina School of Law. Her undergraduate degree is from UMASS, Amherst where she graduated Cum Laude. "We are thrilled to have Shelley join the Protegrity executive team at a time when we are experiencing tremendous growth," said Munshani. "She will use her talent and experience to position Protegrity as the best partner to meet the needs of our rapidly expanding global customer base and partner ecosystem." "What Protegrity is doing to help companies protect their most sensitive data is game-changing," said Westman. "Customers and prospects are relying on us to make their top critical business initiatives a success, while partners are reaching out to collaborate in powerful ways to address their clients' data security needs." About Protegrity: Proven Experts in Data Security Protegrity is the only enterprise data security software platform that leverages scalable, data-centric encryption, tokenization and masking to help businesses secure sensitive information while maintaining data usability. Built for complex, heterogeneous business environments, the Protegrity Data Security Platform provides unprecedented levels of data security certified across applications, data warehouses, mainframes, big data, and cloud environments. Companies trust Protegrity to help them manage risk, achieve compliance, enable business analytics, and confidently adopt new platforms. For additional information visit www.protegrity.com. © 2016 Protegrity USA, Inc. All rights reserved. Protegrity and the Protegrity logo are trademarks of Protegrity Corporation. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners. CONNECT WITH PROTEGRITY: Follow us on Twitter Follow us on LinkedIn


News Article | May 19, 2017
Site: wineandcraftbeveragenews.com

For some, the art of fermentation is a discovery made later in life. For Dan Young, it has guided him at every turn. Young can’t remember a time when fermentation wasn’t part of his life; from the cider left on the cellar steps to ferment to the family’s active involvement in home brewing. “When I was a boy my uncle and grandfather both used to homebrew and make homemade wines,” said Young. “All pretty rough stuff to be sure, but I was introduced to fermentation at an early age.” Following high school, Young enlisted with the Navy. Stationed in California, he was introduced to one of the kings of craft beers, Sierra Nevada, igniting a desire to study fermentation. “I went to the University of Massachusetts in Amherst and received a degree in Food Science and got a job at Long Trail Brewing Company,” said Young. With education and experience behind him, Young and friend Alden Booth opened a microbrewery in 1996. The People’s Pint in Greenfield, MA was one of the first microbreweries in western Massachusetts, attracting the attention of college students studying in Amherst. One of those students, Nikki Rothwell, attracted the attention of Young. “There was a beautiful woman who came in every Friday. Nikki was getting her PhD in Entomology at UMASS and would head to Greenfield to get out of the college town,” Young explained. It’s here Young’s story takes a twist. Rothwell was offered a job in Leelanau County, MI at the Northwest Horticultural Research Station south of Suttons Bay, nearly a thousand miles away from the People’s Pint. It was a position she couldn’t refuse, so Young was persuaded to leave ‘the Pint” for a new adventure in northern Michigan. By 2004, the duo had married and relocated. Though he was entertaining thoughts of opening another brewery, Young was struck by the fruit-growing region, specifically Michigan-grown apples. Young had participated in a homebrew club during his college years, affording him opportunities to experiment with hard cider. And the idea of locally sourced fruit appealed to Young. “When Alden and I opened The People’s Pint we took great pride in using locally sourced proteins and vegetables and it always kind of bugged me that we had to import our beer ingredients. Moving to Leelanau County, I was struck by the amount of fruit grown here and really began to embrace cider.” Young explained it was a push from Michigan State University that finally helped him settle on cider. “They started a hard cider initiative in 2004 to encourage people to start hard cider businesses,” he said. By that time, Young and Rothwell had taken a trip to England, touring the countryside on a tandem bike. During that time, they discovered public houses dedicated to hard cider. The couple contemplated bringing this cider-centered, pub-like tasting room environment to Leelanau County. In honor of their adventures together, Tandem Ciders opened its doors in 2008. While sourcing fruit primarily from both the Leelanau County and Old Mission Peninsula, Young also planted some older cider varieties on land behind the cider house. “We select apples that ferment well and maintain some of their apple flavors. We don’t have a whole lot of locally grown true cider apples yet, but have had great success with old Michigan standards such as McIntosh, Rhode Island Greening, Northern Spy and Jonathan,” he said. At the time Tandem opened, northern Michigan was growing in popularity for its wine and craft beers. Hard ciders were new on the scene. “At that time, we spent a lot of time explaining what cider was and how it’s the same and different than wine,” said Young. “Now that cider has gained popularity and other cideries have opened near us we have cider tourists.” Today Michigan is home to dozens of cideries. Young said he had to adjust to the nuances of cider making, which differed from brewing beer or fermenting grapes for wine. “In brewing you follow much more of a recipe and you have a lot more control over the process. One can change the amount of malt and the mashing temperatures to achieve certain end results,” said Young, who added ciders are far more about the seasons. “Rain at harvest dilutes the sugars in an apple, a cool year will mean less tannins — in this way cider making is much more like wine making. The big difference between grapes and apples is sugar content. An apple having less sugar, makes less alcohol which makes it harder to hide fermentation faults. It’s a learning process.” Young’s advice to anyone interested in making cider: “Respect the apple. Use good, sound fruit, ferment cold and slow to keep those apple flavors and aromas around and be real wary of adjuncts.” He added, “A little sugar, spice, fruit, or oak can be nice, but in my opinion, as soon as it steals the show from the apple, it’s too much.” For inspiration, Young relies on his involvement with home fermenters, who, said Young, “can experiment with different yeasts and smaller batches of apples.” While Tandem has grown over the years, the tasting room and facilities have remained much the same. Young said he is pushing for growth in distribution. Today, Tandem offers its signature Smackintosh, made with locally sourced McIntosh, Rhode Island Greening, and Northern Spy apples, and Greenman made entirely of Rhode Island Greening in 16 oz. cans with a full line of other hard ciders available in 750 ml bottles. For the past five years, production has increased steadily and last year, Tandem produced approximately 30,000 gallons of cider. “We plan to introduce our Sunny Day in 16 oz. cans this year,” said Young. “Our big plans for expansion are with production. Our growth in the future will be distribution. We plan to keep the tasting room pretty much as it is, with small improvements each year.” This strategy is likely due to the huge success of the quaint tasting room, which allows both locals and out-of-towners to feel welcomed as regulars. Tandem is more than a cider house; it echoes the old world style of both the ciders and the public houses of yesteryear.


From information islands to an interoperable ecosystem The Frost & Sullivan report subtitled, "Platform approach key to constructing an Enterprise Imaging strategy" includes clinical, operational and financial medical imaging scenarios for 2027, after "the dust has settled on the recent healthcare system overhauls in various corners of the world".The ways in which the role of the clinician, the use of metrics and key performance indicators, and the impact of imaging on the financial performance of the healthcare enterprise will change, are all explored. The report lays out how management, distribution, access and integration of imaging data will evolve from "information islands to an interoperable ecosystem", and from a silo approach to an integrated platform. Workflows centered on procedures and access numbers will make way for patient- and condition-centered diagnosis and decision support processes. The limited ability for cross-enterprise exchange will evolve towards seamless image and information sharing across health systems. To support its vision 2027, Frost & Sullivan spoke with medical imaging executives from leading healthcare organizations in the USA and in Europe. They identified ten "beneficial results" of using Agfa HealthCare's Enterprise Imaging platform. These include: "We are integrating our entire radiology system onto Agfa HealthCare. All of radiology at our four hospitals will be on a single Agfa HealthCare platform. When we go live with our enterprise imaging platform from Agfa HealthCare, we also go live with our enterprise-wide electronic health record solution," Max Rosen, Chair of the Department of Radiology, UMASS Medical, Massachusetts, USA. "Our EHR platform and our EI platform -these are the two 'towers' that are going to be left standing after the next big health IT earthquake that's coming.  Those two towers will run most of the hospital," RJ Merck, Radiology Supervisor, Zuckerberg San Francisco General, California, USA. "Our patient portal allows patients to access their radiology images from their own record, which they can export to their own public or private record. One of the building blocks for us to achieve that is building a single data repository, along with advanced information lifecycle management capabilities," Paul Bauwens, ICT Architect, Meander Medisch Centrum, Netherlands. "Our more proactive radiologists are starting to leave the basement and becoming more consultative with our physicians. Our new technology is helping immensely in that, but this kind of change is about people, process, and technology-in that order," Dr. Scott Rudkin, Chief Medical Information Officer, UC Irvine Health, California, USA. The report also outlines ten benefits of a partner-oriented approach, including cost containment, alignment with strategic objectives, improved data ownership and leveragability, and reduced implementation complexity. A single-vendor solution means fewer systems are vulnerable to data leaks or exposed to security breaches. It means more IT resources can be dedicated to one comprehensive IT system to ensure constant monitoring, hardened security, simplified upgrading, operational excellence, and continuity of care. "The total cost with one vendor is much smaller. Perhaps, the individual vendors might be less expensive at first, but in the end, it would be much higher overall. The support cost would be greater with multiple vendors. Integration and administration are the most important issues in our IT organization. I believe that we may have reduced our managing costs by 30% or so," Federico Beltrán Carbonell, IT manager, Hospital Intermutual de Levante, València, Spain. "Deconstructed PACS? It's a myth. It will never happen. It's a lot trickier than it may look to pull off. The different components are not so easily plug and play," RJ Merck, Radiology Supervisor, Zuckerberg San Francisco General, California, USA. "In the enterprise cockpit, decision-makers will be able to base virtually every clinical, operational and financial decision on robust and integrated datasets in gearing their imaging service line," concludes the Frost & Sullivan hypothesis laid out in the report. "This critical report by Frost & Sullivan, outlining a vision of where medical imaging is headed in the coming decade, confirms our strategy of developing an interoperable platform solution, built on the unambiguous benefits of a single-source procurement and vendor partnership," comments James Jay, President Imaging IT solutions, Agfa HealthCare. For an image, courtesy of Agfa HealthCare, click here Agfa HealthCare, present in one hospital out of two, is a leading provider of eHealth & Digital Imaging solutions. Care organizations in over 100 countries rely on Agfa HealthCare to optimize their efficiency and improve patient care.


Padma S.,AIIMS | Majaz M.,UMASS
Archives of Medical Science | Year: 2010

The NINDS trial demonstrated for the first time the effectiveness of intravenous thrombolysis in improving outcome after acute ischemic stroke. The absolute benefit of this intervention was 11-13% greater chance of being normal or near normal (MRS ≤ 1) at 3 months. However, if patients with severe stroke were considered (NIHSS ≥ 20), the absolute benefit dropped to 5-6%, indicating that IV thrombolysis may not be as effective for large vessel occlusion. This observation was further supported by TCD studies that clearly demonstrated that large artery occlusions had a recanalization rate of 13-18% with IV rt-PA. Intra-arterial thrombolysis achieves recanalization rates of 60-70%. Since tissue viability is clearly important, it is time to stop defining rigid time windows and if there is a large penumbra (20-50%) and the occlusion is in a large artery, there exists a logic and a growing evidence to consider either bridge therapy or direct intra-arterial therapy. Copyright © 2010 Termedia & Banach.


Melby M.K.,University of Delaware | Melby M.K.,National Institute of Health and Nutrition | Sievert L.L.,UMass | Anderson D.,Queensland University of Technology | Obermeyer C.M.,WHO
Maturitas | Year: 2011

This paper reviews the methods used in cross-cultural studies of menopausal symptoms with the goal of formulating recommendations to facilitate comparisons of menopausal symptoms across cultures. It provides an overview of existing approaches and serves to introduce four separate reviews of vasomotor, psychological, somatic, and sexual symptoms at midlife. Building on an earlier review of cross-cultural studies of menopause covering time periods until 2004, these reviews are based on searches of Medline, PsycINFO, CINAHL and Google Scholar for English-language articles published from 2004 to 2010 using the terms "cross cultural comparison" and "menopause." Two major criteria were used: a study had to include more than one culture, country, or ethnic group and to have asked about actual menopausal symptom experience. We found considerable variation across studies in age ranges, symptom lists, reference period for symptom recall, variables included in multivariate analyses, and the measurement of factors (e.g., menopausal status and hormonal factors, demographic, anthropometric, mental/physical health, and lifestyle measures) that influence vasomotor, psychological, somatic and sexual symptoms. Based on these reviews, we make recommendations for future research regarding age range, symptom lists, reference/recall periods, and measurement of menopausal status. Recommendations specific to the cross-cultural study of vasomotor, psychological, somatic, and sexual symptoms are found in the four reviews that follow this introduction. © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.


Receive press releases from UMASS Amherst Isenberg School of Management: By Email CISDM Equal Weighted Hedge Fund Index Indicates a Positive Performance of 0.63% for November Amherst, MA, December 19, 2016 --( The following displays the performance of CISDM sub-indices. CISDM Equal Weighted Hedge Fund Index Nov % Return: 0.63% YTD % Return: 5.43% CISDM Distressed Securities Index Nov % Return: 1.50% YTD % Return: 9.36% CISDM Equity Long/Short Index Nov % Return: 1.15% YTD % Return: 3.79% CISDM Equity Market Neutral Index Nov % Return: 0.21% YTD % Return: 0.53% CISDM Event Driven Multi-Strategy Index Nov % Return: 2.46% YTD % Return: 7.16% CISDM Fixed Income Arbitrage Index Nov % Return: -0.05% YTD % Return: 4.97% CISDM Global Macro Index Nov % Return: 0.61% YTD % Return: 0.69% CISDM CTA Equal Weighted Index Nov % Return: -0.29% YTD % Return: 3.85% CISDM Fund of Funds Diversified Index Nov % Return: 0.40% YTD % Return: 0.19% S&P 500 Nov % Return: 3.70% YTD % Return: 9.79% MSCI ACWI Nov % Return: 4.82% YTD % Return: 7.52% Barclays US Aggergate Nov % Return: -2.37% YTD % Return: 2.50% The Morningstar CISDM Database (formerly the MAR Database) is the oldest Hedge Fund and CTA database in the market. Tracking qualitative and quantitative information for more than 5000 hedge funds, funds of funds and CTAs since 1994, it is the only database associated with a nonprofit organization. This adds a layer impartiality to their data that other indexes cannot boast. This database is subscribed to by a number of universities and financial institutions. The CISDM places the Isenberg School in the forefront of academic institutions that conduct research into derivatives, alternative investments and asset and risk management, and promotes interactions between the academic and business communities. Have any questions about the CISDM or want to know more about the CISDM-Morningstar Hedge Fund Database and the monthly flash indexes? Hossein Kazemi, the Michael and Cheryl Philipp Endowed Professor Finance at the Isenberg School, is available for comments and interviews. For media inquiries please contact: Kirk Monroe kmonroe@rasky.com 202-207-3646 About the Isenberg School of Management Founded in 1947, the Isenberg School of Management on the University of Massachusetts flagship Amherst campus has 42,000 alumni in 86 countries. Isenberg offers its AACSB-accredited courses to 4,800 students on campus, online, and in blended formats. The School’s 3,400 undergraduates major in seven business disciplines, including industry specialties such as hospitality & tourism management and sport management. Over 1,400 students are enrolled in the Isenberg MBA and they can focus their studies in Health Care Administration, Entrepreneurship, Finance and Marketing. For more information, visit www.Isenberg.umass.edu. Amherst, MA, December 19, 2016 --( PR.com )-- UMass Amherst’s Isenberg School of Management’s Center for International Securities and Derivatives Markets (CISDM) has released its Flash November Equally Weighted Hedge Fund Index. The CISDM Equal Weighted Hedge Fund Index was up 0.63% for the month of November. This brought the year-to-date return to 5.43%. The full version of the index will be released on December 23.The following displays the performance of CISDM sub-indices.CISDM Equal Weighted Hedge Fund IndexNov % Return: 0.63%YTD % Return: 5.43%CISDM Distressed Securities IndexNov % Return: 1.50%YTD % Return: 9.36%CISDM Equity Long/Short IndexNov % Return: 1.15%YTD % Return: 3.79%CISDM Equity Market Neutral IndexNov % Return: 0.21%YTD % Return: 0.53%CISDM Event Driven Multi-Strategy IndexNov % Return: 2.46%YTD % Return: 7.16%CISDM Fixed Income Arbitrage IndexNov % Return: -0.05%YTD % Return: 4.97%CISDM Global Macro IndexNov % Return: 0.61%YTD % Return: 0.69%CISDM CTA Equal Weighted IndexNov % Return: -0.29%YTD % Return: 3.85%CISDM Fund of Funds Diversified IndexNov % Return: 0.40%YTD % Return: 0.19%S&P 500Nov % Return: 3.70%YTD % Return: 9.79%MSCI ACWINov % Return: 4.82%YTD % Return: 7.52%Barclays US AggergateNov % Return: -2.37%YTD % Return: 2.50%The Morningstar CISDM Database (formerly the MAR Database) is the oldest Hedge Fund and CTA database in the market. Tracking qualitative and quantitative information for more than 5000 hedge funds, funds of funds and CTAs since 1994, it is the only database associated with a nonprofit organization. This adds a layer impartiality to their data that other indexes cannot boast. This database is subscribed to by a number of universities and financial institutions.The CISDM places the Isenberg School in the forefront of academic institutions that conduct research into derivatives, alternative investments and asset and risk management, and promotes interactions between the academic and business communities.Have any questions about the CISDM or want to know more about the CISDM-Morningstar Hedge Fund Database and the monthly flash indexes? Hossein Kazemi, the Michael and Cheryl Philipp Endowed Professor Finance at the Isenberg School, is available for comments and interviews.For media inquiries please contact:Kirk Monroekmonroe@rasky.com202-207-3646About the Isenberg School of ManagementFounded in 1947, the Isenberg School of Management on the University of Massachusetts flagship Amherst campus has 42,000 alumni in 86 countries. Isenberg offers its AACSB-accredited courses to 4,800 students on campus, online, and in blended formats. The School’s 3,400 undergraduates major in seven business disciplines, including industry specialties such as hospitality & tourism management and sport management. Over 1,400 students are enrolled in the Isenberg MBA and they can focus their studies in Health Care Administration, Entrepreneurship, Finance and Marketing.For more information, visit www.Isenberg.umass.edu. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from UMASS Amherst Isenberg School of Management


Khalili R.,Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne | Goeckel D.L.,UMASS | Towsley D.,UMASS | Swami A.,U.S. Army
Proceedings - IEEE INFOCOM | Year: 2010

Neighbor discovery is essential for the process of self-organization of a wireless network, where almost all routing and medium access protocols need knowledge of one-hop neighbors. In this paper we study the problem of neighbor discovery in a static and synchronous network, where time is divided into slots, each of duration equal to the time required to transmit a hello message, and potentially, some sort of feedback message. Our main contributions lie in detailing the physical layer mechanism for how nodes in receive mode detect the channel status, describing algorithms at higher layers that exploit such a knowledge, and characterizing the significant gain obtained. In particular, we describe one possible physical layer architecture that allows receivers to detect collisions, and then introduce a feedback mechanism that makes the collision information available to the transmitters. This allows nodes to stop transmitting packets as soon as they learn about the successful reception of their discovery messages by the other nodes in the network. Hence, the number of nodes that need to transmit packets decreases over time. These nodes transmit with a probability that is inversely proportional to the number of active nodes in their neighborhood, which is estimated using the collision information available at the nodes. We show through analysis and simulations that our algorithm allows nodes to discover their neighbors in a significantly smaller amount of time compared to the case where reception status feedback is not available to the transmitters. ©2010 IEEE.


News Article | December 13, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

William Landesman, a licensed real estate agent in the Palm Springs, Rancho Mirage, Palm Desert, Indian Wells, and La Quinta, CA markets, has rejoined the prestigious Haute Living Real Estate Network. The Haute Living Real Estate Network (HLRN) of Hauteresidence.com is proud to recognize William Landesman as a prominent real estate professional and the network’s established partner. HLRN unites a distinguished collective of leading real estate agents and brokers, highlighting the most extravagant properties in leading markets around the globe for affluent buyers, sellers and real estate enthusiasts. William Landesman, of Bennion Deville Homes, brings his vast real estate experience and expertise to the desert communities of the Coachella Valley with a focus on customer service and the ability to understand the needs of his clients, allowing him to provide service above and beyond expectations. His clients’ endorsements clearly speak to this with commonly used accolades like “knowledge, guidance, professionalism, conscientious, and responsive.” His success is proven by the professional recognition he’s received including Rookie of the Year during his first year in business, ranking in the top 3% of agents nationally and the top 6% of agents worldwide at his New Jersey brokerage. William Landesman’s focus on customer service and the ability to understand the needs of his clients allows him to provide service above and beyond expectations. His clients’ endorsements clearly speak to this with commonly used phrases like “knowledge, guidance, and professionalism,” “instrumental and valuable,” and “personal, conscientious, and responsive.” A Massachusetts native and a long-time resident of the greater New York City metropolitan area, William brought his vast real estate experience and expertise to the Coachella Valley’s desert communities. With a storied equestrian background, William has competed nationally for the UMASS Equestrian Team and continued training with Olympic Dressage riders in the US and Europe. He transitioned that experience into a rewarding sales and marketing career before launching a successful and highly respected real estate business serving the needs of communities in New Jersey’s famed horse hunt country and beyond. For the past nine years, William has sat on the Board of Governors of the Equestrian Aid Foundation, which was set up to help people in the horse industry who find themselves in need due to illness or accident. Let William guide you through selling or buying your next home and experience for yourself the level of service and professionalism others have witnessed first-hand. Bennion Deville Homes is one of the largest independent real estate brokerages in Southern California, serving the region from 29 offices throughout the Coachella Valley, San Diego and Orange counties. The powerhouse company serves the Coachella Valley from offices in Palm Springs, Rancho Mirage, Palm Desert, Indian Wells, La Quinta, Bermuda Dunes, and Indio. The LUXE Collection program lists and showcases some of the finest properties available on the market, maximizing exposure of high-end luxury homes to qualified buyers across a variety of mediums and channels. The prestige of the LUXE Collection combined with the strength of the international reach provided by an exclusive strategic partnership with Leading Real Estate Companies of the World® and Luxury Portfolio® gives Bennion Deville Homes agents continued local dominance with an international reach.


Harris A.R.,UMass | Fisher G.A.,UMass | Thomas S.H.,University of Oklahoma
Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery | Year: 2012

BACKGROUND: Since 1900, thousands of medical journal articles have been published on the topic of racial disparities in health and medical outcomes in the United States, including overlapping disparities based on health insurance status. But research on the question of such disparities in the medical treatment of injury from assault-matters of public safety, considerable public expense, and policy debate-is lacking. METHODS: To determine differences by race and insurance status on death from intentional injury by others on and after trauma center arrival, propensity score matching is used to estimate adjusted mortality risk ratios by race and medical insurance controlling for facility, case, and injury characteristics. Analysis is based on a nationally representative sample of 100 Level I and II US trauma centers (National Trauma Data Bank 2005-2008) and includes 137,618 black and white assault cases aged 15 years and older: 35% white, and 65% black, with 46% of the whites and 60% of the blacks coded as uninsured. RESULTS: Black patients showed higher overall raw mortality rates from assault than whites (8.9% vs. 5.1%), but after propensity score matching, the black to white adjusted risk ratio for death from assault (homicide) dropped significantly across firearm, cutting/piercing, and blunt injuries. After adjustment, estimated black deaths were 29% in excess of white deaths for firearm injuries, 36% in excess for cutting/piercing injuries, and 61% in excess for blunt injuries. Uninsured blacks comprised 76% of all excess trauma center deaths from assault. CONCLUSIONS: Along with insurance status, and after excluding on-scene deaths, among patients brought to the Level I and II trauma centers, race is a substantial independent predictor of who dies from assault. Blacks, especially the uninsured, have significantly worse outcomes overall, but there is some evidence that this pattern is minimized at higher levels of injury severity. Copyright © 2012 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.


Nichols B.,UMass
Conference proceedings : ... Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. Conference | Year: 2011

Many end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients suffer from anemia due to insufficient endogenous production of erythropoietin (EPO). The discovery of recombinant human EPO (rHuEPO) over 30 years ago has shifted the treatment of anemia for patients on dialysis from blood transfusions to rHuEPO therapy. Many anemia management protocols (AMPs) used by clinicians comprise a set of experience-based rules for weekly-to-monthly titration of rHuEPO doses based on hemoglobin (Hgb) measurements. In order to facilitate the design of an AMP based on formal control design methods, we present a physiologically-relevant erythropoiesis model, and show that its nonlinear dynamics can be approximated using a static nonlinearity, a step that greatly simplifies AMP design. We demonstrate applicability of our results using clinical data.

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