Addison, TX, United States
Addison, TX, United States

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Clayton J.A.,ULURU | Pavey C.R.,CSIRO | Vernes K.,University of New England of Australia | Tighe M.,University of New England of Australia
Mammal Review | Year: 2014

Translocations have become an increasingly popular tool in threatened macropod conservation in Australia. Although previous evaluations of Australian macropod translocations have been published, the number of contemporary translocation programmes awaiting analysis, and new data regarding historic translocations, required a new assessment of macropod translocation programmes. We aimed to assess trends in the way macropod translocations were conducted during the period 1969-2006, determine the number of successful translocations and identify factors common to successful translocations. Data regarding macropod translocations were obtained from a wide variety of sources, including peer-reviewed journals, 'grey' literature and popular interest publications. Questionnaires were also sent to translocation managers to acquire detailed information. Specific aspects of macropod translocation methodology were analysed, and classification tree analysis was conducted to identify methodological and environmental factors common to successful translocations. We identified 109 macropod translocations for which sufficient data could be collected to permit analysis. Using the presence of a population on 1 January 2007 as a simple criterion, 61% of translocations were successful. Of these translocations, 66% were also considered successful by Short etal.'s criteria (population persisted for five years and is deemed likely to continue to persist); the remainder could not be assessed due to lack of data or insufficient elapsed time since release. Classification tree analysis suggested methodological and environmental factors common to successful translocations; the overriding factor determining success was the absence of cats and foxes at the release site. Although Australian macropod translocation proponents are faced with myriad methodological options when designing a translocation protocol, the primary consideration should be whether or not cats or foxes are present at the release site. Managers should be aware that there may be no safe population level of such predators for some translocation candidate species. Ignoring this fact will inevitably lead to a repeat of past translocation failures. © 2014 The Mammal Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.


Trademark
Uluru | Date: 2010-10-05

After sun creams; Lip balm; Lotions for face and body care; Skin conditioning creams for cosmetic purposes; Skin moisturizer; Sun care lotions.


Trademark
Uluru | Date: 2011-01-11

Nanoparticle hydrogel for use in connection with wound care.


Trademark
Uluru | Date: 2010-08-31

Bakery desserts; Bakery goods; Bakery products; Bakery products, namely, sweet bakery goods; Mixes for bakery goods; Coffee.


Trademark
Uluru | Date: 2010-07-06

Medicated and non-medicated wound dressing containing nanoparticle hydrogel.


A thin, flexible, bilayer or multi-layer film which when applied to a moist surface of a body tissue adheres and delivers an active agent, pharmaceutical compound, nutraceutical, flavor or other substance to the underlying surface and/or body cavity and erodes at a predetermined rate. In one application, the amount of time that the active agent remains in contact with the teeth surfaces is controlled by the composition and thickness of the backing layer of the composite film. This erosion or residence time can be regulated from one half hour to several hours, depending upon the desired therapeutic or cosmetic application.


The present invention relates to the delivery of pharmaceuticals and other compounds to any wet tissue surface with a preferred application on mucosal surfaces. The device consists of a layered film comprising an adhesive layer, an erodible backing layer and an optional outer layer to improve mouth feel. Upon application, the device adheres to a wet tissue surface, and based on the composition of the erodible backing layer which is laminated to the adhesive layer, the device erodes uniformly and at a constant rate from the outside in. Due to this constant and unexpected uniform erosion characteristic, any compound present in the adhesive layer will be delivered to the treatment site at a rate dependent only on the erosion rate of the device. A pseudo zero order delivery rate is attained when an active is delivered on the oral mucosa and this rate can be regulated simply by changing the composition and thickness of the erodible backing layer. This backing layer is composed of both water soluble and water insoluble polymers, and by careful manipulation of the amount of each, the erosion rates can be regulated and subsequent drug delivery rates can be reproducibly altered. In addition, by keeping the device attached to the mucosa for extended and controlled periods of time, the active will pass through the intercellular pathway and provide more rapid and increased therapeutic blood levels. By changing only the backing layer of the device, peak blood levels can be altered.


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

ADDISON, Texas, Feb. 28, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- ULURU Inc. (OTCQB: ULUR), a specialty medical technology company focused on the development of a portfolio of wound management and oral drug delivery products, today announced it has entered into a Note, Warrant and Preferred Stock Purchase...


News Article | November 14, 2016
Site: www.prnewswire.com

ADDISON, Texas, Nov. 14, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- ULURU Inc. (OTCQB: ULUR) today announced its financial results for the third quarter ended September 30, 2016 and provided a review of its operating activities. Commenting on ULURU Inc. (the "Company") activities, Helmut Kerschbaumer,...

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