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Corazza M.V.,University of Rome La Sapienza | Guida U.,UITP | Musso A.,University of Rome La Sapienza | Tozzi M.,UITP
Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment | Year: 2015

This paper deals with EBSF - European Bus System of the Future, 3iBS - the Intelligent, Innovative Integrated Bus Systems and ZeEUS - Zero Emission bUs Systems, three research projects funded by the European Commission, with the aim to develop a new generation of buses. The common task is to develop innovative solutions to increase the attractiveness of this mode and to operate more environmentally-friendly vehicles.Key working areas are more comfortable layouts, advanced ITS-based solutions to improve operations, new engines designed to save fuel and the enhancement of the electric option. Concern for the environment lies behind the majority of these innovations. The innovations are tested in real urban environments and performance assessed through Key Performance Indicators. Within EBSF it was also possible to perform a Transferability Exercise (TE) to assess the theoretical exportability of the innovations to more urban contexts.The research objective of this paper is to critically revise the projects' results and present them for further applications beyond the European projects field. Results thus far stressed contrasting aspects within a common vision for the development of a new generation of buses. Stakeholders are well aware of the need to comply with the European standards in the field of sustainable mobility. This is shown by the fact that the majority of them are becoming more environmentally aware about the need to renew their fleets. However, because of economical reasons they fail to consider any environmental concerns in the TE, even when these should be crucial in the transfer decisions. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.


Barr L.,UITP
Public Transport International | Year: 2010

For the first time since 1999, CUTA and UITP joined forces to bring about the joint International Security Conference. Taking place in Montreal on 11-12 November 2009, with support from local host STM, the conference showcased presenters from Canada, the Middle East, the USA, Singapore and all across Europe. The bringing together of knowledge from around the world enabled participants to exchange best practices and learn about innovative measures to combat daily operational security issues as well as the challenge of terrorism.


The 2025=PTx2 Conference, held in Venice, Italy, from November 6-8, 2011, focused on efforts to make public transport a part of a modern urban lifestyle. The participants were informed that changes needed to be introduced in public transport at the earliest. These changes needed to be implemented and embodied in concrete policies, strategies, and action plans. Significantly increasing the public transport market share by 2025 required all public transport actors to work jointly so as to lead the change in mobility and citizens' behavior. A change in public transport companies' business was to help in developing lifestyle services. The delivering of customer-oriented services was also to impact the corporate culture, HR policies, and the performance of the company.


Mezghani M.,UITP
Public Transport International | Year: 2011

UITP has published a Focus Paper, calling for the development of combined mobility bringing together public transport and other modes, such as car-sharing, taxis and bicycles. UITP Focus Paper mentions that classification of urban transport modes is based on two essential aspects that include the notion of access to a transport system and of its use. The informal transport, transport on demand, or car-pooling have the same objectives as conventional public transport, namely a shared and collective use of a vehicle. It reduces energy consumption and emissions per passenger transported, and the unit cost of the trip, and makes better use of the road space necessary for passenger travel. Conventional public transport alone cannot meet transport demand and citizens' expectations so it must enlarge its offer to include other shared means of transport. The shared transport could also cover a public or private business, a social or commercial service, in a regulated or unregulated environment.


Mezghani M.,UITP
Public Transport International | Year: 2011

Several issues need to be addressed to ensure efficient transport organization in the African countries. Several modes and types of operation that exist along-side each other and do not meet the same regulatory criteria creates a disorganized mobility market, poor service quality, and unfair, even illegal, competition between operators, often with no public authority intervention. The funding problems and the disengagement of public authorities are evident in a lack of high-capacity modes with which to provide mass transit services, even though potential demand is significant. The public transport's regulatory framework needs to be strengthened and made clearer in order to remove any doubt about which responsibilities are national and which local. The priority is to create organizing authorities such as CETUD in Dakar, LAMATA in Lagos and AGETU in Abidjan. All the transport policies need to address pollution caused by mobility and ensure road safety.


Guida U.,UITP
Public Transport International | Year: 2011

The EBSF project, coordinated by UITP, is an initiative of the European Commission under the 7th Framework Programme for Research and Technological Development. For the first time, five leading European Bus manufacturers and 42 other partners in 11 EU countries are joining forces to spearhead the emergence of a new generation of bus systems. Over four years, starting September 2008, and with an overall budget of 26 EUR million, the EBSF partners are developing innovative solutions for vehicles and infrastructures in combination with operational best practices.


Luyten D.,UITP | Barr L.,UITP
Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part F: Journal of Rail and Rapid Transit | Year: 2011

Ensuring the security of public transport is particularly challenging for reasons such as the open and accessible nature of public transport networks and the limited resources of the operators. Conducting a security risk assessment study is therefore a useful starting point. First, a risk analysis is conducted to establish the occurrence and impact of threats on the network. This is then followed by a vulnerability assessment study, which helps to decide where and how to invest scarce resources to protect the system. To summarize, we can say that: Risk Assessment=Risk Analysis+Vulnerability Assessment. Due to length restrictions, the present article will focus on risk analysis. The issue of the vulnerability assessment can be found in the full study*. A security risk analysis is different to a safety risk analysis. For example, a safety risk analysis can make use of frequency of occurrence of safety events using data from experience. Due to the rarity of terrorist attacks on public transport, the element of frequency cannot be used for a security risk analysis. The International Association of Public Transport (UITP) Security Commissiony identified security risk assessment as a priority topic for research. Therefore, in the context of COUNTERACT, a European project funded by the European Commission, UITP and the project team developed 'Generic Guidelines for Conducting Security Risk Assessment in Public Transport Networks'. The user-friendly guidelines, which were successfully tested by an urban public transport operator, outline a qualitative risk assessment methodology which can be adapted by the operator to suit specific needs, in a step-by-step approach, specifically designed for public transport. This article will outline how the methodology was developed, as well as lessons learned from the test which was carried out. To supplement these User Guidelines, further details of the risk assessment methodology are presented in the accompanying paper by Sanchez. © Authors 2011.


Mezghani M.,UITP
Public Transport International | Year: 2011

A number of visionary and courageous mayors played key roles in developing innovative and successful public transport systems in Curitiba, Bogotá, London, and Seoul. Jaime Lerner was one of these visionary and courageous mayors who served three terms as mayor in Curitiba, Brazil, from 1971-1992. He made significant contributions to the development of the bus rapid transit (BRT), being regarded as the inventor or the investigator of the system. He favored the creation of high-density population and employment corridors around the BRT routes, with the density dropping as the distance from the route itself increases. Enrique Peñalosa was another visionary and courageous mayor who adopted the BRT concept in Bogotá, while working as its mayor from 1998-2000. Ken Livingstone, the mayor of London, played a key role in introducing the system of congestion charging in the city where vehicles had to pay to enter the city's central area.


Since 2001, UlTP's life is marked by the biennial Marketing Conference organised by the Commission on Marketing and Product Development. The 5th edition took place in Lisbon on 7-9 October 2009 thanks to the outstanding support of Companhia Carris de Ferro de Lisboa and Metropolitano de Lisboa and their respective Presidents of the Boards of Directors, Mr. Jose Manuel Silva Rodrigues and Mr. Joaquim Jose de Oliveira Reis. With more than 200 participants coming from the four corners of the world, the Conference turned out to be once again a very successful and inspiring event.


Pourbaix J.,UITP
Public Transport International | Year: 2011

The 59th UITP World Congress Mobility & City Transport Exhibition revealed that the market share of public transport was to increase by 2025 due to significant efforts being made in the sector around the world. The world's urban population was expected to rise from 3.2 billion in 2005 to 4.5 billion in 2025. Urban population growth was to be fastest in Africa, Asia-Pacific, and MENA. The number of trips made in urban areas every day was to increase by 50% between 2005 and 2025, reflecting the growth in urban population and the increase in the number of trips made by each citizen in developing economies. The number of trips made by public transport was to increase by about 30%, white the number of trips made by private motorized vehicles was to increase by around 80%. It was suggested that increasing the market share of public transport and keeping the share of walking and cycling stable was to make it possible to disassociate the growth of mobility in urban areas from the growth of its societal and environmental costs.

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