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Vijongbu, South Korea

Koh I.J.,Uijeongbu St. Marys Hospital | Koh I.J.,Catholic University of Korea | Kwak D.-S.,Catholic University of Korea | Kim T.K.,Seoul National University | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Arthroplasty | Year: 2014

We investigated the quantitative effect and risk factors for over-release during multiple needle puncturing (MNP) for medial gap balancing in varus total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Of the ten pairs of cadaveric knees, one knee from each pair was randomly assigned to undergo MNP in extension (E group), while the other knee underwent MNP in flexion (F group). The increased extension and 90° flexion gaps after every five needle punctures were measured until over-release occurred. The extension gap (< 4. mm) and the 90° flexion gap (< 6. mm) gradually increased in both groups. The 90° flexion gaps increased more selectively than did the extension gaps. MNP in the flexed knee, a narrow MCL, and severe osteoarthritis were associated with a smaller number of MNPs required to over-release. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. Source


Koh I.J.,Uijeongbu St. Marys Hospital | Koh I.J.,Catholic University of Korea | Cho W.-S.,University of Ulsan | Choi N.Y.,Catholic University of Korea | Kim T.K.,Seoul National University
Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research | Year: 2014

Background: Failure after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) may be related to emerging technologies, surgical techniques, and changing patient demographics. Over the past decade, TKA use in Korea has increased substantially, and demographic trends have diverged from those of Western countries, but failure mechanisms in Korea have not been well studied. Questions/purposes: We determined the causes of failure after TKA, the risk factors for failure, and the trends in revision TKAs in Korea over the last 5 years. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 634 revision TKAs and 20,234 primary TKAs performed at 19 institutes affiliated with the Kleos Korea Research Group from 2008 to 2012. We recorded the causes of failure after TKA using 11 complications from the standardized complication list of The Knee Society, patient demographics, information on index and revision of TKAs, and indications for index TKA. The influences of patient demographics and indications for index TKA on the risk of TKA failure were evaluated using multivariate regression analysis. The trends in revision procedures and demographic features of the patients undergoing revision TKA over the last 5 years were assessed. Results: The most common cumulative cause of TKA failure was infection (38%) followed by loosening (33%), wear (13%), instability (7%), and stiffness (3%). However, the incidence of infections has declined over the past 5 years, whereas that of loosening has increased and exceeds that of infection in the more recent 3 years. Young age (odds ratio [OR] per 10 years of age increase, 0.41; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.37-0.49) and male sex (OR, 1.88; 95% CI, 1.42-2.49) were associated with an increased risk of failure. The percentage of revision TKAs in all primary and revision TKAs remained at approximately 3%, but the annual numbers of revision TKAs in the more recent 3 years increased from that of 2008 by more than 23%. Conclusions: Despite a recent remarkable increase in TKA use and differences in demographic features, the causes and risk factors for failures in Korea were similar to those of Western countries. Infection was the most common cause of failure, but loosening has emerged as the most common cause in more recent years, which would prompt us to scrutinize the cause and solution to reduce it. Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. See the Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. © 2013 The Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons®. Source


Koh I.J.,Uijeongbu St. Marys Hospital | Koh I.J.,Catholic University of Korea | Chang C.B.,Seoul National University | Lee J.H.,Seoul National University | And 2 more authors.
Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research | Year: 2013

Background: Dexamethasone is a potent analgesic and antiemetic. However, the benefit of dexamethasone after TKA is unclear, as is the efficacy in a current multimodal regime. Questions/purposes: We determined (1) whether the addition of dexamethasone to a protocol including ramosetron further reduces postoperative emesis compared with ramosetron alone; (2) whether it reduces postoperative pain; and (3) whether it increases the risk for wound complications in a current multimodal regime after TKA. Methods: We randomized 269 patients undergoing TKAs to receive dexamethasone (10 mg) 1 hour before surgery and ramosetron immediately after surgery (Dexa-Ra group, n = 135), or ramosetron alone (Ra group, n = 134). We recorded the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), severity of nausea, incidence of antiemetic requirement, complete response, pain level, and opioid consumption. Patients were assessed 0 to 6, 6 to 24, 24 to 48, and 48 to 72 hours postoperatively. In addition, patients were evaluated for wound complications and periprosthetic joint infections at a minimum of 1 year after surgery. Results: The Dexa-Ra group had a lower incidence of PONV during the entire 72-hour evaluation period and experienced less severe nausea for the first 6 hours after TKA, although not between 6 to 72 hours. Overall use of a rescue antiemetic was less frequent, and complete response was more frequent in the Dexa-Ra group. Patients in the Dexa-Ra group experienced lower pain and consumed less opioids during the 6- to 24-hour period and during the overall study period. No differences were found in wound complications between the groups, and each group had one case of periprosthetic joint infection. Conclusions: Patients who received prophylactic dexamethasone in addition to ramosetron had reduced postoperative emesis and pain without increased risks for wound complications, compared with patients who received ramosetron alone in patients managed using a multimodal regimen after TKA. Level of Evidence: Level I, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. © 2013 The Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons®. Source


Koh I.J.,Uijeongbu St. Marys Hospital | Chang C.B.,Seoul National University | Jeon Y.-T.,Seoul National University | Ryu J.-H.,Seoul National University | Kim T.K.,Seoul National University
Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research | Year: 2012

Background Current pain management protocols involving many anesthetic and analgesic drugs reportedly provide adequate analgesia after TKA. However, control of emetic events associated with the drugs used in current multimodal pain management remains challenging. Questions/purposes We determined (1) whether ramosetron prophylaxis reduces postoperative emetic events; and (2) whether it influences pain levels and opioid consumption in patients managed with a current multimodal pain management protocol after TKA. Methods We randomized 119 patients undergoing TKA to receive either ramosetron (experimental group, n = 60) or no prophylaxis (control group, n = 59). All patients received regional anesthesia, preemptive analgesic medication, continuous femoral nerve block, periarticular injection, and fentanyl-based intravenous patient-controlled analgesia. We recorded the incidence of emetic events, rescue antiemetic requirements, complete response, pain level, and opioid consumption during three periods (0-6, 6-24, and 24-48 hours postoperatively). The severity of nausea was evaluated using a 0 to 10 VAS. Results The ramosetron group tended to have a lower incidence of nausea with a higher complete response and tended to have less severe nausea and fewer rescue antiemetic requirements during the 6- to 24-hour period. However, the overall incidences of emetic events, rescue antiemetic requirements, and complete response were similar in both groups. We found no differences in pain level or opioid consumption between the two groups. Conclusions Ramosetron reduced postoperative emetic events only during the 6- to 24-hour postoperative period and did not affect pain relief. More efficient measures to reduce emetic events after TKA should be explored. © The Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons® 2012. Source


Won H.S.,Uijeongbu St. Marys Hospital | Chun H.G.,Seoul St. Marys Hospital | Lee K.,Seoul St. Marys Hospital
Journal of Medical Case Reports | Year: 2011

Introduction. Smooth muscle tumors of uncertain malignant potential represent a histologically heterogeneous group of uterine smooth muscle tumors that cannot be diagnosed as either benign or malignant. Smooth muscle tumors of uncertain malignant potential are usually clinically benign, but should be considered tumors of low malignant potential because they can occasionally recur or metastasize to distant sites. Case presentation. We report the case of a 62-year-old Mongol woman diagnosed with a retroperitoneal smooth muscle tumor of uncertain malignant potential and lung metastasis, with a history of prior hysterectomy. The case was initially misdiagnosed as retroperitoneal sarcoma, and our patient received chemotherapy. However, no interval change in the size of the retroperitoneal mass and metastatic lung nodules was seen over a period of at least five years. She underwent partial resection of the retroperitoneal mass for the purposes of debulking and establishing a histopathological diagnosis. The diagnosis of the retroperitoneal mass was then confirmed as a smooth muscle tumor of uncertain malignant potential. Conclusion: Smooth muscle tumors of uncertain malignant potential have an unpredictable clinical course, and relapses generally appear to occur after a long disease-free interval of up to several years. Therefore, patients diagnosed with smooth muscle tumors of uncertain malignant potential should receive long-term follow-up. © 2011 Won et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. Source

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