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News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Annapolis, MD; April 7, 2017--The conventional wisdom about where many mosquitoes lay their eggs--in standing water--is not always wise. Research into a diverse group of mosquitoes shows that many, if not most, regularly lay their eggs on a variety of surfaces, and in a surprising location: above nearby water. The findings run counter to scientific generalizations about the mosquitoes' egg-laying habits and may complicate the work of researchers and mosquito control professionals. In a study to be published next week in the Entomological Society of America's Journal of Medical Entomology, researchers at the University of Florida (UF) showed that several species of mosquitoes in the genus Culex, subgenus Melanoconion, lay their eggs on surfaces above standing water, contrary to the behavior of other Culex. "Our findings show us that even the most classic paradigms in medical entomology need to be closely scrutinized," says Nathan D. Burkett-Cadena, Ph.D., assistant professor at the UF Florida Medical Entomology Laboratory and co-author of the study. The mosquito species Culex pipiens, for instance, has been well studied due to its prominent role in transmission of human pathogens such as West Nile virus. The focus on Culex pipiens and related mosquitoes has resulted in an apparent over-generalization that laying of eggs as a "raft" on the surface of standing water is common across all Culex species. The UF researchers' examination of species in subgenus Melanoconion--along with a review of historical research on other Culex species--suggest that "the generalized floating egg raft strategy does not apply to the vast majority of Culex species," they write. The mosquitoes egg-laying behaviors were studied with a laboratory setup in which female mosquitoes were placed in screened cages with dishes containing both standing water and partially submerged objects, such as a terra cotta or segments of mangrove roots. The researches then recorded where the mosquitoes laid their eggs. Surprisingly, most egg clusters were laid on surfaces of the terra cotta and roots, not on open water, as textbooks would have predicted. Mosquito species in subgenus Melanoconion are known vectors of eastern equine encephalitis and Venezuelan equine encephalitis. A clearer understanding of their egg-laying habits will help mosquito control professionals better target them, though Burkett-Cadena says they may "find it challenging to reach their targets due to the odd oviposition of the mosquitoes." "Oviposition Strategies of Florida Culex (Melanoconion) Mosquitoes," by Erik M. Blosser and Nathan D. Burkett-Cadena, will be published online on April 12 in the Journal of Medical Entomology. Journalists may request advance copies of the study via the contact below. ABOUT: ESA is the largest organization in the world serving the professional and scientific needs of entomologists and people in related disciplines. Founded in 1889, ESA today has over 6,000 members affiliated with educational institutions, health agencies, private industry, and government. Headquartered in Annapolis, Maryland, the Society stands ready as a non-partisan scientific and educational resource for all insect-related topics. For more information, visit http://www. . Journal of Medical Entomology publishes research related to all aspects of medical entomology and medical acarology, including the systematics and biology of insects, acarines, and other arthropods of public health and veterinary significance. For more information, visit https:/ , or visit http://www. to view the full portfolio of ESA journals and publications.


News Article | April 20, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

Quebec City, April 20, 2017 - (TSXV: HEO) - H O Innovation Inc. ("H O Innovation" or the "Corporation") is proud to announce that it was awarded six (6) new projects in the United States. These new contracts bring the Corporation's project sales backlog to $58.2 M. The Corporation's first contract is a reverse osmosis ("RO") system treating Lake Texoma's water, located on the Texas and Oklahoma border. This new system will replace the existing conventional and electrodialysis reversal (EDR) one previously installed. H O Innovation had also won the contract for the ultrafiltration system using the FiberFlexTM open-platform, for that same municipality, at the end of 2015. By awarding this project to H O Innovation, the customer will be able to save more time and money on the integration of the new RO system within the existing UF one. With this extension, the system will treat 11.3 MGD (42,775 m3/day) of ultrafiltered water and 5 MGD (18,927 m3/day) of reverse osmosis effluent, creating the Corporation's largest combined UF and RO project. The second project awarded to H O Innovation consists of a skid mounted nanofiltration ("NF") system to serve as an expansion to the existing system that the Corporation provided back in 1999. This system will be shipped by boat and will produce 0.4 MGD (1,308 m3/day) of potable water for a municipality located on the North Slope of Alaska. A pair of additional contracts brings H O Innovation to work with two municipalities in the State of Montana. The first is a wastewater facility using the Corporation's new flexMBRTM open-platform membrane bioreactor (MBR). Flat sheet membranes will be used in the process for separation of solids to help meet regulatory requirements. The second municipal project is a FiberFlexTM UF system delivering municipal drinking water. The Corporation has also won two smaller water treatment projects, a reverse osmosis facility in the State of Florida and another FiberFlexTM UF in Michigan. "We are very proud of the wide diversity of technologies used in these new projects that span our core competencies: ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis, nanofiltration and membrane bioreactors. These new flexMBRTM and FiberFlexTM contracts also confirm the Corporation's ability to build on an expanding market trend for flexibility and contractual freedom for membrane asset management", stated Denis Guibert, Vice President and General Manager of Engineering Division of H O Innovation. About H O Innovation H O Innovation designs and provides state-of-the-art, custom-built and integrated water treatment solutions based on membrane filtration technology for municipal, industrial, energy and natural resources end-users. The Corporation's activities rely on three pillars which are i) water and wastewater projects; ii) specialty products and services, including a complete line of specialty chemicals, consumables, specialized products for the water treatment industry as well as control and monitoring systems; and iii) operation and maintenance services for water and wastewater treatment systems. For more information, visit www.h2oinnovation.com. Neither TSX Venture Exchange nor its Regulation Services Provider (as that term is defined in the policies of the TSX Venture Exchange) nor the Alternext Exchange accepts responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of this release.


News Article | April 20, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

Quebec City, April 20, 2017 - (TSXV: HEO) - H O Innovation Inc. ("H O Innovation" or the "Corporation") is proud to announce that it was awarded six (6) new projects in the United States. These new contracts bring the Corporation's project sales backlog to $58.2 M. The Corporation's first contract is a reverse osmosis ("RO") system treating Lake Texoma's water, located on the Texas and Oklahoma border. This new system will replace the existing conventional and electrodialysis reversal (EDR) one previously installed. H O Innovation had also won the contract for the ultrafiltration system using the FiberFlexTM open-platform, for that same municipality, at the end of 2015. By awarding this project to H O Innovation, the customer will be able to save more time and money on the integration of the new RO system within the existing UF one. With this extension, the system will treat 11.3 MGD (42,775 m3/day) of ultrafiltered water and 5 MGD (18,927 m3/day) of reverse osmosis effluent, creating the Corporation's largest combined UF and RO project. The second project awarded to H O Innovation consists of a skid mounted nanofiltration ("NF") system to serve as an expansion to the existing system that the Corporation provided back in 1999. This system will be shipped by boat and will produce 0.4 MGD (1,308 m3/day) of potable water for a municipality located on the North Slope of Alaska. A pair of additional contracts brings H O Innovation to work with two municipalities in the State of Montana. The first is a wastewater facility using the Corporation's new flexMBRTM open-platform membrane bioreactor (MBR). Flat sheet membranes will be used in the process for separation of solids to help meet regulatory requirements. The second municipal project is a FiberFlexTM UF system delivering municipal drinking water. The Corporation has also won two smaller water treatment projects, a reverse osmosis facility in the State of Florida and another FiberFlexTM UF in Michigan. "We are very proud of the wide diversity of technologies used in these new projects that span our core competencies: ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis, nanofiltration and membrane bioreactors. These new flexMBRTM and FiberFlexTM contracts also confirm the Corporation's ability to build on an expanding market trend for flexibility and contractual freedom for membrane asset management", stated Denis Guibert, Vice President and General Manager of Engineering Division of H O Innovation. About H O Innovation H O Innovation designs and provides state-of-the-art, custom-built and integrated water treatment solutions based on membrane filtration technology for municipal, industrial, energy and natural resources end-users. The Corporation's activities rely on three pillars which are i) water and wastewater projects; ii) specialty products and services, including a complete line of specialty chemicals, consumables, specialized products for the water treatment industry as well as control and monitoring systems; and iii) operation and maintenance services for water and wastewater treatment systems. For more information, visit www.h2oinnovation.com. Neither TSX Venture Exchange nor its Regulation Services Provider (as that term is defined in the policies of the TSX Venture Exchange) nor the Alternext Exchange accepts responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of this release.


News Article | April 20, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

Quebec City, April 20, 2017 - (TSXV: HEO) - H O Innovation Inc. ("H O Innovation" or the "Corporation") is proud to announce that it was awarded six (6) new projects in the United States. These new contracts bring the Corporation's project sales backlog to $58.2 M. The Corporation's first contract is a reverse osmosis ("RO") system treating Lake Texoma's water, located on the Texas and Oklahoma border. This new system will replace the existing conventional and electrodialysis reversal (EDR) one previously installed. H O Innovation had also won the contract for the ultrafiltration system using the FiberFlexTM open-platform, for that same municipality, at the end of 2015. By awarding this project to H O Innovation, the customer will be able to save more time and money on the integration of the new RO system within the existing UF one. With this extension, the system will treat 11.3 MGD (42,775 m3/day) of ultrafiltered water and 5 MGD (18,927 m3/day) of reverse osmosis effluent, creating the Corporation's largest combined UF and RO project. The second project awarded to H O Innovation consists of a skid mounted nanofiltration ("NF") system to serve as an expansion to the existing system that the Corporation provided back in 1999. This system will be shipped by boat and will produce 0.4 MGD (1,308 m3/day) of potable water for a municipality located on the North Slope of Alaska. A pair of additional contracts brings H O Innovation to work with two municipalities in the State of Montana. The first is a wastewater facility using the Corporation's new flexMBRTM open-platform membrane bioreactor (MBR). Flat sheet membranes will be used in the process for separation of solids to help meet regulatory requirements. The second municipal project is a FiberFlexTM UF system delivering municipal drinking water. The Corporation has also won two smaller water treatment projects, a reverse osmosis facility in the State of Florida and another FiberFlexTM UF in Michigan. "We are very proud of the wide diversity of technologies used in these new projects that span our core competencies: ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis, nanofiltration and membrane bioreactors. These new flexMBRTM and FiberFlexTM contracts also confirm the Corporation's ability to build on an expanding market trend for flexibility and contractual freedom for membrane asset management", stated Denis Guibert, Vice President and General Manager of Engineering Division of H O Innovation. About H O Innovation H O Innovation designs and provides state-of-the-art, custom-built and integrated water treatment solutions based on membrane filtration technology for municipal, industrial, energy and natural resources end-users. The Corporation's activities rely on three pillars which are i) water and wastewater projects; ii) specialty products and services, including a complete line of specialty chemicals, consumables, specialized products for the water treatment industry as well as control and monitoring systems; and iii) operation and maintenance services for water and wastewater treatment systems. For more information, visit www.h2oinnovation.com. Neither TSX Venture Exchange nor its Regulation Services Provider (as that term is defined in the policies of the TSX Venture Exchange) nor the Alternext Exchange accepts responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of this release.


The U.S. Defense Department is looking for ways to speed up cognitive skills training -- the types of skills useful for specialists such as linguists, intelligence analysts and cryptographers -- and is awarding University of Florida engineers and neuroscientists up to $8.4 million over the next four years to investigate how to do that by applying electrical stimulation to peripheral nerves as a means of strengthening neuronal connections in the brain. Two neuroengineering experts in UF's Herbert Wertheim College of Engineering are among eight team leaders across the country receiving awards announced Wednesday under the Targeted Neuroplasticity Training program of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, or DARPA. The program's goal is to develop safe and effective enhanced training regimens that accelerate the acquisition of cognitive skills while reducing the cost and time of the DoD's extensive training program. A large percentage of the work involves fundamental research to decipher the neural mechanisms that underlie the influence of nerve stimulation on brain plasticity. Under an award of up to $4.2 million, Kevin J. Otto, Ph.D., will lead a team of neuroscientists from the Evelyn F. and William L. McKnight Brain Institute of the University of Florida and the Malcom Randall VA Medical Center to identify which neural pathways in the brain are activated by vagal nerve stimulation. The team will conduct behavioral studies in rodents to determine the impact of vagal nerve stimulation on perception, executive function, decision-making and spatial navigation. This could potentially lead to an expansion of the use of vagal nerve stimulation, a therapy currently applied to prevent seizures in patients with epilepsy and to treat depression and chronic pain. "There are clinical applications, but very little understanding of why it works," said Jennifer L. Bizon, a professor of neuroscience at UF and an investigator on Otto's team. "We are going to do the systematic science to understand how this stimulation actually drives brain circuits and, ultimately, how to maximize the use of this approach to enhance cognition." The research funded by the DARPA awards will test the mechanisms by which peripheral nerve modulations make learning faster and more efficient. For military analysts on the job, "One hypothetical example would be target detection," said co-investigator Barry Setlow, Ph.D., a professor of psychiatry at UF. "So for people who spend hours a day looking for things of interest on a screen, if by stimulating their vagus nerve at just the right time you can help them realize performance improvements more quickly, then they become better attuned to the fine details of images." The technology has the potential to help Defense Department personnel advance through training more quickly, yet effectively. "Currently, they could spend 50 years of their careers, 80 hours a week, just doing training and still wouldn't be qualified to do every single thing," said Otto, an associate professor in the J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering. "So they're always interested in increasing mechanisms of learning and memory." Otto said if investigators can gain a more complete understanding of how targeted neuroplasticity works, they may be able to figure out how to optimize learning while avoiding potential side effects, such as blood pressure manipulation, heart rate changes and perceived visceral pain. In a second UF effort, and with an additional $4.2 million award, Karim Oweiss, Ph.D., a professor of electrical and computer engineering, biomedical engineering and neuroscience, will study the mechanisms by which cranial nerve stimulation can affect brain activity. His lab will use advanced optical imaging that will produce extremely high-resolution images of brain dynamics to map the functional circuitry in areas of the brain responsible for executive function. Additionally, optogenetic interrogation, a technique to drive specific brain cells to fire or go silent in response to targeted illumination, will be used to study the causal involvement of these areas in learning cue salience and working memory formation in rodents trained on auditory discrimination and decision making tasks. Oweiss will collaborate with Qi Wang, an assistant professor at Columbia University. Wang's lab will focus on the noradrenergic pathway -- a neuromodulator widely responsible for brain attention and arousal -- and the extent to which it is engaged when rodents learn a tactile discrimination task. Oweiss' project seeks to demonstrate the effects of vagal nerve stimulation on cognitive-skill learning and the brain activity supporting those skills, as well as to optimize the stimulation parameters and training protocols for long-term retention of those skills. "We want to see if it's possible to promote targeted changes in specific brain circuits to accelerate this process by stimulating the vagus nerve, which sends close to 80 percent of its output back to the brain," Oweiss said. "So if one knows that 'brain area A' talks to 'brain area B' when learning a new language, can we develop training protocols that promote the exchange between these two areas while leaving other areas unaltered? Then the person will learn at a faster rate and retain the skills for much longer." The implications of both projects reach beyond accelerated learning speeds. "If we identify specific ways that neural pathways change as a person learns, then if a person loses brain function, we could potentially rewire disconnected brain areas and personalize neural rehabilitation," said Oweiss. "This technology could be used to restore quality of life much quicker if brain function has been compromised."


News Article | March 2, 2017
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

As we head into allergy season, you may feel less likely to grab a hanky and sneeze. That’s because new University of Florida research shows a probiotic combination might help reduce hay fever symptoms, if it’s taken during allergy season. Many published studies have shown a probiotic’s ability to regulate the body’s immune response to allergies, but not all of the probiotics show a benefit, UF researchers say. “Not all probiotics work for allergies. This one did,” said Jennifer Dennis, a doctoral student in the UF food science and human nutrition department in UF’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences and first author on the latest study. Scientists already know that the probiotic combination of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria, sold as Kyo-Dophilus in stores, helps maintain digestive health and parts of the immune system. They suspect that probiotics might work by increasing the human body’s percentage of regulatory T-cells, which in turn might increase tolerance to hay fever symptoms. UF researchers wanted to know if the components in this combination probiotic would help alleviate allergy symptoms. To do that, they enrolled 173 healthy adults who said they suffered seasonal allergies and randomly split them into two groups: Some took the combination probiotic; others took a placebo. Each week during the eight-week experiment, participants responded to an online survey to convey their discomfort level. Scientists also analyzed DNA from participants’ stool samples to determine how their bacteria changed, because probiotics aim to deliver good bacteria to the human’s intestinal system. The DNA test also confirmed who was taking the probiotic, said Bobbi Langkamp-Henken, a professor of food science and human nutrition and a senior author of the study. The researchers conducted the experiment at the height of spring allergy season. Participants who took the probiotic reported improvements in quality of life, compared to those taking the placebo, the study showed. For example, participants suffered fewer allergy-related nose symptoms, which meant that they were less troubled during daily activities. Researchers note that this study did not include severe allergy sufferers. But the combination of probiotics showed clinical benefit for those with more mild seasonal allergies, Langkamp-Henken said. According to other published research in the field, seasonal allergies can reduce sleep and productivity at work or school and can cause stress and embarrassment. Further, current allergy medications have unwanted potential side effects, including dry mouth and drowsiness; thus the need for alternatives, the researchers say. The study is published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.


News Article | January 24, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

Snake catchers from India are helping find and remove Burmese pythons in environmentally sensitive areas in Florida. In just two weeks since their arrival early this January, a pair of Irula tribesmen from India, in collaboration with biologists from the University of Florida, managed to catch 14 pythons, which include a 16-foot female snake. The Indian trackers and biologists found the python along with three other snakes. Based on the number of snakes they captured, the skills of the tribesmen are exceptional in that they were able to catch 14 snakes in just two weeks. For perspective, hunters who participated in the Python Challenge, a yearly contest that aims to give attention to the python problem in Florida, were able to capture just 106 snakes last year. The Python Challenge was participated in by 1,000 snake hunters who are mostly amateurs. The hunters who participated the year before that snagged only 68 snakes. The snake trackers use non-conventional tracking techniques to catch their targets but these appear to work. UF biologist Frank Mazzotti, who is part of a team that investigates pythons and other wildlife, said that seven of the snakes that have so far been captured would not have been found without the help of the tribesmen.The tribesmen are members of the Irula tribe whose members are famed snake hunters in India. "Since the Irula have been so successful in their homeland at removing pythons, we are hoping they can teach people in Florida some of these skills," said Kristen Sommers from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. "We are working with our partners to improve our ability to find and capture pythons in the wild." The snake hunters are not only efficient. The pilot project involving them is also comparably cheap. The project costs only $68,888 for tribesmen Masi Sadaiyan and Vadivel Gopal and two translators for two months. Since their arrival early this month, the two men who are both in their 50s, have been heading into the Everglades nearly every day armed with tire irons for punching through dense Burma reed and sharp limestone rock. Assisted by biologists, the pair search for the sparkle of snakeskin in the bush and look out for what snakes leave behind, such as ripples in the sands and tunnels through grass or scat. The signs alert them of the presence of snakes. Although Burmese pythons are native to Southeast Asia, they have managed to establish a breeding population in South Florida, which became a problem since these slithering animals prey on birds, crocodilian species, and mammals. Experts have observed that the pronounced reduction in the number of animal species coincided with the spread of pythons in Florida, suggesting the impact of the snakes' population on native animals. Biologists have tried using radio-tagged "Judas" snakes, trained dogs, and even poisoned prey to combat the problem but the snakes' number keeps growing. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | March 1, 2017
Site: phys.org

Collecting data from the shells of dead mollusks is a low-cost, low-impact way of glimpsing how oceans looked before pollution, habitat loss, acidification and explosive algae growth threatened marine life worldwide. Mollusk fossils can inform current and future conservation and restoration efforts, said Michal Kowalewski, the Jon L. and Beverly A. Thompson Chair of Invertebrate Paleontology at the Florida Museum of Natural History on the UF campus and the study's principal investigator. "These fossils are like marine time machines that can unveil bygone habitats that existed before humans altered them," he said. "Shells can help us understand past marine life and more precisely gauge recent changes in marine ecosystems. Fossils are the only direct way of learning what these ecosystems looked like before human activities altered them." Because mollusks, such as conchs, oysters and mussels, are abundant and often have sturdy shells, their remains litter much of the Earth's sea floor. These mollusk graveyards offer a treasure trove of information about the state of oceans over thousands of years, recording patterns in the diversity and distribution of marine animals across and within habitats with surprising accuracy, said Carrie Tyler, who conducted the work as a postdoctoral researcher at the museum and is now an assistant professor of invertebrate paleontology at the Miami University of Ohio. Many scientists have questioned whether mollusks alone can provide insights into entire ecosystems. Currents and storms can carry organisms' remains away, while others are fragmented, destroyed or—in the case of soft-bodied animals such as jellyfish and worms—completely absent from the fossil record. Also, shell graveyards are often a mix of specimens from many centuries, which can muddle ecological interpretations. "The remains that do accumulate only represent part of the whole ecosystem," said Tyler, the study's lead author. "These and other factors can create bias in the fossil record, making comparisons between modern and fossil ecosystems suspect." To test mollusks' ability to faithfully record biodiversity, Tyler and Kowalewski surveyed living and dead marine animals at 51 sites off the coast of North Carolina, selecting spots that differed in environmental conditions and the kinds of species they hosted. Aiming to capture a range of habitats, the researchers surveyed inlets, estuaries and open ocean, from the coast to miles offshore. They tested whether changes in diversity from place to place were accurately recorded by the newly-forming fossil record. They also assessed whether mollusks could reflect these ecosystem-wide changes. Tyler and Kowalewski found that live and dead mollusks accurately recorded spatial diversity patterns in both living and fossil communities of marine bottom-dwelling organisms. By comparing present-day communities of marine animals to dead remains, they discovered that mollusk shells alone accurately reconstructed differences in ecosystems across habitats and correctly tracked changes in the distribution of animals from shallow to deeper waters. A unique aspect of the study, Kowalewski said, was investigating whether mollusks reliably recorded shifts in entire communities of bottom-dwelling animals across habitats and space. "If we look at many spots on the sea floor and evaluate how living bottom-dwelling animals vary in space, do we recover the same information by analyzing shell remains of only one type of organism, such as mollusks? Our data indicate that we can," he said. "The good match between dead and living organisms suggests that we can use historical data to look at not just which species existed in the past, but also whether the spatial structure of these ecosystems changed." Understanding how the diversity of species changes within habitats and from site to site across the sea floor is crucial for effectively planning protected marine areas and coastal resource management, Kowalewski said. It is also a part of an increased effort to approach ecosystem conservation more broadly, focusing not only on the vulnerability of individual species but also on how species congregate within and across habitats. Whether mollusks can provide insights into an ecosystem's more mobile animals, such as fish, remains unclear. But regardless of how much mollusks can tell us about fish, turtles or mammals, understanding marine invertebrate biodiversity is critical to restoring and protecting ocean health, Tyler said. "Invertebrates provide food for fish, birds and marine mammals, purify water and are important for commercial fisheries," she said. "The ability to use mollusks to understand how invertebrate communities are changing in response to human activities can help us protect and manage ecosystems that are critical for maintaining life in the oceans and to society." Explore further: Humans altering Adriatic ecosystems more than nature, study shows More information: Surrogate Taxa and Fossils as Reliable Proxies of Spatial Biodiversity Patterns in Marine Benthic Communities, Proceedings of the Royal Society B, rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/lookup/doi/10.1098/rspb.2016.2839


Dublin, Feb. 23, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Conductive Ink Markets 2017-2027: Forecasts, Technologies, Players" report to their offering. This report provides the most comprehensive and authoritative view of the conductive inks and paste market, giving detailed ten-year market forecasts segmented by application and material type. The market forecasts are given in tonnage and value at the ink level. It also includes critical reviews of all the competing conductive inks and paste technologies including firing-types pastes, PTFs, silver nanoparticles, stretchable inks, IME inks, copper, and more. This report also gives fact-based and insightful analysis of all the existing and emerging target applications. For target applications, it provides an assessment and/or forecast of the addressable markets, key trends and challenges, latest results and prototype/product launches, and the analyst's insight on the market potential. We provide a detailed analysis of at least 17 existing and emerging application sectors including silicon solar cells, UF/UHF RFID tags, touch screen edge electrodes, automotive, in-mould electronics, e-textiles, 3D antennas, 3D printed electronics, desktop PCB printers, ITO replacement, OLED lighting and others. Conductive inks and paste business: everything is changing The conductive inks and pastes market will reach over $1.7b in 2027 at current metal prices. Micro-sized silver conductive pastes will dominate the market, controlling nearly the entire market in 2017. Silver nanoparticles will however become increasingly competitive, finding use in a range for emerging applications sectors to become an $80m market by 2027. Copper will remain a comparatively immature technology but will achieve limited success as novel curing systems are installed to open the door to copper ink sales. The solar panel industry will be 1.4 k tonne market in 2017 for screen-printed firing-type conductive pastes. At the paste level, a new group of suppliers will soon come to dominate this business whilst at the powder level the users will force through a more diversified supplier base. The touch screen edge electrode market will continue its decline. The linewidth-over-spacing (L/S) has decreased to 20/20, pushing screen printing with standard PTFs beyond its limits and opening the door to photocurable pastes. Etching-based techniques will find additional opportunities as the bezel is further narrowed whilst standard PTTs will retain some share in the low-cost end of the market. Sensors such as car occupancy sensors, printed piezoresistive sensors and some versions of glucose sensors will remain a substantial niche market for conductive pastes, as will the automotive sector with its mixed grouping of stagnant traditional and high-growth emerging applications. HF and UHF RFID antenna markets will grow but will see the relative market share of ink types transform over the coming decade. 3D antennas made using aerosol printing will continue gaining traction. This approach will compete head-on with MID (molded interconnect devices) techniques and will become a substantial player in the consumer electronics market. Metal mesh as an ITO alternative will make slow inroads despite the pending consolidation period in the TCF industry, creating demand for silver nanoparticle used in filling or printing fine lines. New markets will emerge and create new performance requirements. In-mould electronics will demand inks that can stretch and survive the thermoforming/molding process. Electronic textiles will require inks that are truly stretchable and withstand repeated washing cycles. 3D printed electronics and desktop PCB printers will need the high conductivity and low temperature inks to open vast new prototyping possibilities for 3D printers and circuit designers. All these markets are poised for rapid growth provided technology innovations can satisfy the market pull. Ten-year market projections split by application. Please contact us for the exact values. Note that ink selling prices have declined thanks to a decline in raw metal prices but also pressured margins, resulting in a decrease in our revenue forecasts. Key Topics Covered: 1. Executive Summary And Conclusions 2. Conductive Inks And Pastes 3. Silver Nanoparticle Production Methods 4. Copper Inks And Paste 5. Conductive Pastes In The Photovoltaic Market 6. Automotive 7. 3D Printed Electronics 8. Touch Panel Edge Electrodes 9. Conductive Inks In RFID 10. Printed And Flexible Sensors 11. 3D Antennas And Conformal Printing On Curved Surfaces 12. Thermoformed Or In-Mould Electronics 13. Stretchable Inks For Electronic Textiles 14. Stretchable Conductive Inks In Flexible And/Or Stretchable Circuit Boards 15. Printed Circuit Board Manufacturing And Prototyping 16. Ito Replacement (Transparent Conducting Films) 17. Conductive Pens 18. Mobile Phone Digitizers - First High-Volume Market For Silver Nanoparticle Inks? 19. Oled Lighting Market 20. Large Area Led Lighting Arrays 21. Printed Thin Film Transistors 22. Printed Memories 23. Emi Shielding Using Conductive Inks 24. Metamaterials And Engineered Structures Using Conductive Inks 25. E-Readers 26. Other Nascent Application Ideas 27. Company Interviews 28. Company Profiles For more information about this report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/q3zlnh/conductive_ink About Research and Markets Research and Markets is the world's leading source for international market research reports and market data. We provide you with the latest data on international and regional markets, key industries, the top companies, new products and the latest trends.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prlog.org

Company recognized among innovative Gator-led businesses for second year -- JK2 Construction & Scenic has been named to the elite Gator100 list for the second year in a row based on its outstanding growth.The annual Gator100 list honors the 100 fastest-growing businesses in the world that are owned or led by alumni of the University of Florida. This is the third year for the awards, which are sponsored by UF, the Warrington College of Business and the Entrepreneurship & Innovation Center.To qualify, companies must have been in business for five years or more and had revenues of $250,000 or more in 2013. From January 2013 to October 2016, a UF alumnus or group of alumni must have owned 50 percent or more of the company, have served as chief executive or have founded the company and served on the senior management team.Companies are ranked by compounded annual growth rate, or CAGR, over a three-year period. JK2 Construction & Scenic made the list out of hundreds of companies that applied."At JK2, we're always proud to be recognized for our outstanding work," said JK2 Founder and President Paul Holmes. "But being part of the Gator100 is even sweeter for us as proud UF alumni. Our outstanding education truly set the foundation for the success of our family construction business."JK2 was ranked 45 with a CAGR of 48.22 percent, up from number 72 in 2016. Both JK2 Construction and JK2 Scenic have experienced incredible growth over the last few years. JK2 Construction has completed several major projects at Universal Studios Orlando and several amenity centers for national home builders. Meanwhile, JK2 Scenic has grown revenue by 1,000 percent since 2013 and has recently completed major projects at both Universal Studios Orlando and Disney Springs.JK2 has three UF graduates currently in leadership roles within the company: President Paul Holmes, Construction Division Vice President Rick Amundson and Scenic Division Vice President Julie Holmes.Paul Holmes earned a Bachelor of Science with honors in business, followed by graduate studies at the School of Building Construction. Rick Amundson received a Bachelor of Building Construction degree. Julie Holmes was a Cum Laude graduate, earning a Bachelor of Science in civil engineering and is a three-year letter winner of the University of Florida women's swimming and diving team.

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