Dayton, OH, United States
Dayton, OH, United States

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Patent
UES, Inc. | Date: 2016-11-04

An metallographic system comprising a programmable controller, a robotic arm, a specimen clamping or holding device, a sectioning saw, a mounting station, a polishing station, a specimen preparation station, and an analyzer for examining the specimen.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 225.00K | Year: 2015

Corrosion induced degradation of material components in the harsh environment of light water reactor can impact reactor reliability, availability, safe operation and eventually life. A possible remedy could be to replace the replaceable components at appropriate moments which may not be economically favorable. Thus there is a need to develop technologies to repair degraded materials. STATEMENT OF HOW THIS PROBLEM IS BEING ADDRESSED Corrosion resistant weld overlays are currently being used to improve the service life of material components made with corrosion prone material. However, the welding technology has serious issues such as dilution and susceptibility to cracking. In this program a novel technology will be developed that will not have the issues associated with the currently utilized welding process. WHAT IS TO BE DONE IN PHASE I In this Phase I STTR work samples appropriate for testing in light water reactor environment will be fabricated and treated with the proposed technology. The relevant performance of the as- treated samples will be evaluated in light water reactor environment. Based on the performance data the feasibility of the proposed technology will be demonstrated. COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS AND OTHER BENEFITS Given limits on new nuclear reactor builds imposed by economics and industrial capacity, the extended service of the existing fleet will be essential. The proposed technical approach to increase the life of the existing nuclear reactors consists of the repair of the degraded materials. This approach is expected to minimize the new builds with concomitant economic benefit. The proposed technology can be easily utilized in many other non-nuclear commercial applications involving restoration of metallic components having corrosion related damage. KEY WORDS Light water reactor, Stainless steel, Ni base alloys, Stress corrosion cracking, Repair, Welding SUMMARY FOR MEMBERS OF CONGRESS The life of nuclear reactor can be seriously impacted by the degradation of material components in the harsh environment of reactor. The proposed technology is expected to extend the service life of the existing nuclear reactor fleet through damage repair/mitigation of reactors metallic components.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 1.73M | Year: 2015

ABSTRACT: Electrical motors are rapidly replacing hydraulic motors in flight actuators for aircraft applications. In hydraulic systems, accumulators are used to store regenerative energy from the actuators as well as to supply peak energy demands of these actuators in response to flight control system demands. No electrical analog (Electrical Accumulator Unit) exists in production, although some prototype hardware has been demonstrated to store/supply transient electric energy (~100 Kwatt spikes). Advanced EAU designs merge the emergency power function (battery energy storage) with the transient electrical energy function. Working with the battery, the resultant Dual Mode EAU (DMEAU) would have the following functions: emergency power, transient energy supply/storage, battery charging, engine starting and 270 VDC power generation. The DMEAU would meet the requirements of the current BCCU space . For this proposal, an advanced EAU breadboard converter will be fabricated and tested to expected aircraft actuator transient loads with an emulated energy storage battery BENEFIT: Fabrication of an advanced packaged EAU converter will increase the technology readiness level of the DMEAU. The combined outcomes of weight savings and increased vehicle capability will spur the application of Dual Mode Electrical Accumulator Units to several thousand high performance aircraft.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2015

ABSTRACT: This Phase I SBIR program seeks a novel process to produce the new hybrid ultra-high temperature (UHTC) ceramic composites that can survive the hypersonic flights. The new process will produce a very unique grain and graded microstructure that can offer high strength (>100 kpsi), high fracture toughness (>10 MPam), and high thermal shock resistance, and high oxidation resistance over 2000oC. Thus, the new hybrid composites can serve as leading edges for hypersonic applications. Spark plasma sintering or hot-pressing will be used as a means for densification during the Phase I feasibility study. In the Phase II work, a near-net shape, hybrid composite process will be explored for sharp leading edges. BENEFIT: The successful completion of the Phase I program will provide the foundation needed to produce oxidation and thermal shock resistant UHTCs. Examples of primary applications are leading edges for hypersonic flights, as well as solid rocket motors (SRM) for various DoD applications including all rocket nozzles, and other ground-based missile interceptors.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2015

ABSTRACT: CuBe alloy is the material of choice for highly wear resistant, high strength bushing material utilized frequently in landing gear applications. However, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) lists beryllium (Be) as hazardous with inhalation of Be-containing particulate leading to inflammation of the lungs and chronic beryllium disease and lesion development in the lungs with long-term exposure. Thus, the objective of this project is to research and qualify substitutes for CuBe material in high load landing gear applications. As an alternative to the CuBe alloy, we propose development of Cu based binary and ternary alloys without Be. The alloy compositions will be determined from analysis and calculations of equilibrium and non-equilibrium phase diagrams using a combination of computer coupling of phase diagrams and thermochemistry as well as limited experimental data available in the open literature. Selected alloys will be fabricated and tested for mechanical and tribological properties. Sub-scale bushing tests will be conducted on selected alloys.; BENEFIT: The new environmentally friendly Cu based alloys developed in this project will replace hazardous CuBe alloy for high load landing gear applications for military airplanes. It is expected that materials proven through this effort will also be suited to commercial landing gear applications.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 1.50M | Year: 2016

Corrosion induced degradation of material components in the harsh environment of light water reactor can impact reactor reliability, availability, safe operation and eventually life. A possible remedy could be to replace the replaceable components at appropriate moments which may not be economically favorable. Thus there is a need to develop technologies to repair degraded materials. STATEMENT OF HOW THIS PROBLEM IS BEING ADDRESSED Corrosion resistant weld overlays are currently being used to improve the service life of material components made with corrosion prone material. However, the welding technology has serious issues such as dilution and susceptibility to cracking. In this program a novel technology will be developed that will not have the issues associated with the currently utilized welding process. WHAT IS TO BE DONE IN PHASE I In this Phase I STTR work samples appropriate for testing in light water reactor environment will be fabricated and treated with the proposed technology. The relevant performance of the as- treated samples will be evaluated in light water reactor environment. Based on the performance data the feasibility of the proposed technology will be demonstrated. COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS AND OTHER BENEFITS Given limits on new nuclear reactor builds imposed by economics and industrial capacity, the extended service of the existing fleet will be essential. The proposed technical approach to increase the life of the existing nuclear reactors consists of the repair of the degraded materials. This approach is expected to minimize the new builds with concomitant economic benefit. The proposed technology can be easily utilized in many other non-nuclear commercial applications involving restoration of metallic components having corrosion related damage.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 849.93K | Year: 2015

For advanced gas turbines where turbine inlet temperature reaches 2650F and beyond, the current state-of-the-art thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems are not adequate to provide the needed protection for the metallic components of the turbine engine. Thus there is a need to develop new chemistries for TBC systems, consisting of bond coat and top coat, with enhanced durability. We propose to modify the coating chemistry of high temperature top coat material to impart higher toughness needed for high temperature durability. We also propose to develop highly durable bond coat chemistry. The Phase I approach consists of the feasibility demonstration of the developed coating chemistries whereas the phase II approach involves optimization of the bond coat and top coat chemistries in relation to their relevant properties. In the Phase I work, appropriate top and bond coat materials were selected and appropriately processed to render their chemistry suitable for high temperature applications. The processed top and bond coats were characterized to show that they have the desired characteristics that were lacking for application at higher temperature with enhanced durability. In the Phase II work, the top and bond coat chemistries will be further optimized to impart optimal desired characteristics. Also in Phase II, approaches will be developed to manufacture optimal top coat material on a commercial scale. Complete TBC systems with optimal top and bond coat will be manufactured and characterized to demonstrate their relevant characteristics needed for high temperature applications. Commercial Applications and Other Benefits: The TBC systems developed in this program will have application in turbine engines utilized in electric power production, propelling aircraft, pumping fluids etc. Successful completion of the project will enable gas turbine engines to operate at elevated temperatures with higher efficiency (lower cost), lower emission (less environmental pollution) and increased reliability and performance.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2015

The drive toward higher efficiency engines is demanding higher performance Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBC), both bond and top coats. This proposal is aimed at developing new and improved bond coats for the TBC system. STATEMENT OF HOW THIS PROBLEM IS BEING ADDRESSED High-entropy alloys (HEAs) have potential to be used as high temperature materials and in coating material applications due to their combination of strength, ductility, thermal stability, corrosion and wear resistance. We propose to develop new and improved bond coats using selected HEAs. Both cathodic arc evaporation and plasma spray will be used for coating deposition. WHAT IS TO BE DONE IN PHASE I In Phase I, we will initially explore cathodic arc evaporation of a few compositions selected from the design approach introduced by a co-investigator of this proposal. This will be a cost-effective process to quickly evaluate a few compositions. One composition will be down-selected from this initial screening for plasma spray deposition in Phase I. In Phase II, plasma spray technologies will be utilized extensively to deposit selected HEA coatings for field applications. COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS AND OTHER BENEFITS Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) applied to the surfaces of metallic parts in the hottest part of gas-turbine engines enable modern engines to operate at significantly higher gas temperatures, and therefore, at higher efficiencies than their predecessors. Gas turbine engines are a $42 billion industry worldwide (2010) with 65% of the sales accounting for jet engines and the remainder land-based engines for electricity generation. The latter fueled by natural gas or liquid fuels produce ~25% of all electricity in the U.S. and ~20% worldwide (2010). An increase in the engine efficiency will also decrease air pollution, especially with carbon dioxide, per 1 kW of produced energy, which is critical for regulating global warming. KEY WORDS Thermal barrier coatings, Bond coats, Gas turbine engines, Cathodic arc deposition, Plasma spray, High entropy alloy SUMMARY FOR MEMBERS OF CONGRESS TBCs applied to the surfaces of metallic parts in the hottest part of gas turbine engines enable modern engines to operate at significantly higher gas temperatures, and therefore, at higher efficiencies than their predecessors. UES Services, Inc. (UES Services) will develop new bond coatings for TBCs that will protect the metallic surfaces from oxidation and corrosion and enable engines to run at higher temperatures.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 412.74K | Year: 2016

ABSTRACT: This Phase II SBIR program involves a novel process to produce new hybrid ultra-high temperature (UHTC) ceramic composites that can survive hypersonic flight conditions. The new process will produce a very unique grain and graded microstructure that can offer high strength (> 100 kpsi), high fracture toughness (> 10 MPam), high thermal shock resistance, and high oxidation resistance over 2000oC. Thus, the new hybrid composites can serve as leading edges for hypersonic applications. Spark plasma sintering or hot-pressing will be used as a means for densification. In addition, near-net shape fabrication will be explored to produce sharp leading edges during the Phase II program.; BENEFIT: The successful completion of the Phase II program will provide the foundation needed to produce oxidation and thermal shock resistant UHTCs. Examples of primary applications are leading edges for hypersonic vehicles, as well as solid rocket motors (SRM) for various DoD applications including all rocket nozzles, and other ground-based missile interceptors.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 846.11K | Year: 2014

Gas turbine engines utilized in electric power production and aircraft propulsion need to operate at higher temperatures for enhanced efficiency and lower emissions. Development of the proposed thermal barrier coating technology with unique architectural design will enable the operation of turbine engines at higher operating temperature.

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