Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

UCSI University is a multi-campus private university based in Malaysia, with a campus also in Bangladesh. UCSI University is a member of the UCSI Education Group which comprises UCSI International School Springhill, UCSI International School Subang, Sri UCSI School, UCSI Child Development Centre, UCSI Publishing House and UCSI Extension. Wikipedia.

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Ang C.-S.,UCSI University
Computers in Human Behavior | Year: 2017

To examine the relationship between internet habit strength and online communication, as well as the moderating effect of gender on this relationship, 1572 adolescents were recruited to complete anonymous self-report questionnaire. Current findings found that internet habit strength was positively associated with online communication, but that this association was stronger for females than it was for males. This suggests that females with stronger internet habit strength were more likely to engage in online communication than males. The findings indicate that gender does have a decision influence on online communication since it alters the habit strength in Internet. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd


Manickam B.,UCSI University | Sreedharan R.,UCSI University | Elumalai M.,UCSI University
Current Drug Delivery | Year: 2014

One of the popular approaches in controlling drug delivery from the polymeric carriers is suitably achieved by the inclusion of crosslinking agents into the formulations at different concentrations. Nevertheless, addition of the chemical crosslinkers such as glutaraldehyde, formaldehyde etc, used in the drug delivery systems causes very serious cytotoxic reactions. These chemical crosslinking agents did not offer any significant advantageous effects when compared to the natural crosslinking agents for instance genipin, which is quite less toxic, biocompatible and offers very stable crosslinked products. Based on the earlier reports the safety of this particular natural crosslinker is very well established, since it has been widely used as a Chinese traditional medicine for long-time, isolated from fruits of the plant Gardenia jasminoides Ellis. This concise article largely portrayed the value of this unique natural crosslinker, utilized in controlling the drug delivery from the various formulations. © 2014 Bentham Science Publishers.


News Article | November 17, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Recognizing the urgent, growing need for innovation to meet international health, environmental and economic challenges, investments in research are surging, with governments demanding the biggest possible return from every public dollar. The fruits of scientific research - nanotechnology, medicines and countless new materials and products - are transforming economies and society at an unprecedented and unpredictable speed and scale. And nations are racing to keep up. UN data show world R&D investments grew from (inflation adjusted) $660 billion to almost $1.5 trillion between 1990 to 2013. Much of that growth comes from Asia, where research funding has almost quadrupled - from $167 billion to $623 billion over those 23 years. Particularly in low- and middle-income nations, where spending on research and development has traditionally been limited, governments looking to secure economic growth and sustainability are reforming old funding agencies or creating new ones, and pouring money into them. This energized new research ecosystem faces some major challenges, however, which will be addressed by research funding agency representatives from 17 countries at an Asia Pacific regional meeting of the Global Research Council (Nov. 20-21, Kuala Lumpur), hosted by the Malaysian Industry-Government Group for High Technology (MIGHT). First, as research becomes an increasingly global collaborative enterprise, and with so much at stake, the efficiency and effectiveness of collaborations need to improve to maximize results. Improving cooperation can enhance the quality of science, avoid unnecessary duplication, provide economies of scale, and address issues that can only be solved by working together. Secondly, as funders place growing emphasis on their investment's return, how do societies manage the seemingly contentious relationship between "fundamental research," aimed at discovery of new knowledge, and "innovation," intended to generate from the new knowledge more immediate economic growth and jobs? A recent report in the journal Nature, citing UNESCO data, says "more money than ever is being invested in research and development. Countries that previously spent little are now pumping money into science to secure their future economic growth." "Growth in gross domestic expenditures on research and development (GERD) between 2003 and 2013 was relatively slow in the United States and Europe, where research spending is high overall. The strongest growth has been in Eastern Europe, Asia and Latin America." Examining research and development investments as a percentage of GDP, World Bank and OECD data show the big spender nations also tend to be among the most prosperous. The Global Research Council plays a crucial role in removing barriers to collaboration between developed and developing nations, creating standards and basic principles for appropriate peer review of research, for example. These include the transparency of the evaluation process, impartiality and confidentiality. Other active concerns include e.g. ensuring the accuracy of data and ethical standards in research involving human subjects. The meeting in Kuala Lumpur is one of five regional sessions designed to generate ideas for discussion at the GRC's 6th annual global conference (Ottawa, Canada, May 2017), co-organized by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) and the Consejo Nacional de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Tecnológica of Peru (CONCYTEC), in partnership with Canada's International Development Research Centre (IDRC)). Among the goals of the GRC meeting in Malaysia: foster and accelerate collaboration across national boundaries, recognizing every nation's unique needs for economic growth, national security, and human capital development. Participants will also discuss specific Asia Pacific challenges and identify opportunities for new and / or strengthened collaborations. Discussion papers for the meeting say research has assumed a more "problem-based" focus over the past 20 years, involving larger teams of academic and non-academic experts from multiple disciplines. It is also being shaped by increasing openness - more public communication, data sharing and citizen engagement. In nations with a long research tradition, many scientists lament the loss of support for fundamental research and defend the value of discovery of new knowledge as a requisite and critical element in societal progress. Governments and their agencies "invest considerable sums in the research enterprise," with the goal of long-term economic growth and societal benefits, the GRC says, adding that integrating fundamental research and innovation is not only a practical necessity but will also produce better outcomes. "A successful and vibrant research enterprise should succeed at both." Nations are called to increase their research and education capacity through, for example, staff exchange programs, workshops and institutional pairing. Tan Sri Zakri Abdul Hamid, Science Advisor to the Prime Minister of Malaysia, says it is no coincidence that, between 2000 and 2012, Malaysia's Gross Domestic Product per capita grew from US$ 4000 to almost $10,800 as national R&D investment rose from 0.5 to 1.13% of GDP. And while economic headwinds due to commodity prices this year have affected the growth of R&D funding in some countries, Malaysia included, it is important for all nations to invest even more, he says. "To meet the daunting challenges in decades to come, humanity has set and needs to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals. This requires ambitious national investments in science, technology and innovation, as well as basic science and science education and literacy. "We need innovation to accelerate the generation of energy from renewable sources, to improve the quality of our air and to make the fullest use of our precious fresh water resources, to create strong new building materials locally, to improve and protect health and agriculture through nanotechnology, and in so many other vital areas." "These challenges can best be met by combining the strengths of all nations and Malaysia extends its welcome and its highest support to the GRC and its efforts to maximize the effectiveness and efficiency of research collaborations and capabilities at the regional and global levels." Says Dato' Azman Mahmud, Chief Executive Officer of the Malaysian Investment Development Authority (MIDA), a conference keynote speaker: "With the pace of economic development increasing worldwide, Malaysia aims to achieve R&D intensity of at least 2.0% by 2020, recognizing the importance of this investment to our well-being and future sustainability. R&D fuels innovation, sharpens our competitive advantage and enables us to create new industries and exploit new economic opportunities." "As the principal investment promotion agency for the country, MIDA develops strong R&D linkages throughout the country, encouraging and nurturing partnerships. MIDA looks forward to the planting of powerful, creative ideas through this event." Says Senior Professor Dato' Dr. Khalid Yusoff, Vice-Chancellor and President, UCSI University, Chairman of the Organising Committee of the GRC Regional Meeting: "The rise of international collaboration over the past two decades is dramatically increasing the impact and importance of research, and that success in turn is inspiring even greater funding of and cooperation among scientists." "Successful research programs inevitably require fundamental research. Governments feel a growing need to demonstrate accountability and more immediate economic returns, however. How to resolve that tension and harmonise these two seemingly discrete targets is a primary focus of this important meeting in KL and we look forward to the discussions and recommendations." The Malaysian Industry-Government Group for High Technology (MIGHT) is a not-for-profit company limited by guarantee under the purview of the Prime Minister of Malaysia. MIGHT is an organization built on the strength of public-private partnership with more than 100 members, both local and international, from industry, government and academia. MIGHT is dedicated to providing a platform for industry-government consensus building in the drive to advance high technology competency in Malaysia. The GRC is is a virtual organization, comprised of the heads of science and engineering funding agencies from around the world, dedicated to promoting the sharing of data and best practices for high-quality collaboration among funding agencies worldwide.


News Article | November 17, 2016
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

Recognizing the urgent, growing need for innovation to meet international health, environmental and economic challenges, investments in research are surging, with governments demanding the biggest possible return from every public dollar. The fruits of scientific research - nanotechnology, medicines and countless new materials and products - are transforming economies and society at an unprecedented and unpredictable speed and scale. And nations are racing to keep up. UN data show world R&D investments grew from (inflation adjusted) $660 billion to almost $1.5 trillion between 1990 to 2013. Much of that growth comes from Asia, where research funding has almost quadrupled - from $167 billion to $623 billion over those 23 years. Particularly in low- and middle-income nations, where spending on research and development has traditionally been limited, governments looking to secure economic growth and sustainability are reforming old funding agencies or creating new ones, and pouring money into them. This energized new research ecosystem faces some major challenges, however, which will be addressed by research funding agency representatives from 17 countries at an Asia Pacific regional meeting of the Global Research Council (Nov. 20-21, Kuala Lumpur), hosted by the Malaysian Industry-Government Group for High Technology (MIGHT). First, as research becomes an increasingly global collaborative enterprise, and with so much at stake, the efficiency and effectiveness of collaborations need to improve to maximize results. Improving cooperation can enhance the quality of science, avoid unnecessary duplication, provide economies of scale, and address issues that can only be solved by working together. Secondly, as funders place growing emphasis on their investment's return, how do societies manage the seemingly contentious relationship between "fundamental research," aimed at discovery of new knowledge, and "innovation," intended to generate from the new knowledge more immediate economic growth and jobs? A recent report in the journal Nature, citing UNESCO data, says "more money than ever is being invested in research and development. Countries that previously spent little are now pumping money into science to secure their future economic growth." "Growth in gross domestic expenditures on research and development (GERD) between 2003 and 2013 was relatively slow in the United States and Europe, where research spending is high overall. The strongest growth has been in Eastern Europe, Asia and Latin America." Examining research and development investments as a percentage of GDP, World Bank and OECD data show the big spender nations also tend to be among the most prosperous. The Global Research Council plays a crucial role in removing barriers to collaboration between developed and developing nations, creating standards and basic principles for appropriate peer review of research, for example. These include the transparency of the evaluation process, impartiality and confidentiality. Other active concerns include e.g. ensuring the accuracy of data and ethical standards in research involving human subjects. The meeting in Kuala Lumpur is one of five regional sessions designed to generate ideas for discussion at the GRC's 6th annual global conference (Ottawa, Canada, May 2017), co-organized by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) and the Consejo Nacional de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Tecnológica of Peru (CONCYTEC), in partnership with Canada's International Development Research Centre (IDRC)). Among the goals of the GRC meeting in Malaysia: foster and accelerate collaboration across national boundaries, recognizing every nation's unique needs for economic growth, national security, and human capital development. Participants will also discuss specific Asia Pacific challenges and identify opportunities for new and / or strengthened collaborations. Discussion papers for the meeting say research has assumed a more "problem-based" focus over the past 20 years, involving larger teams of academic and non-academic experts from multiple disciplines. It is also being shaped by increasing openness - more public communication, data sharing and citizen engagement. In nations with a long research tradition, many scientists lament the loss of support for fundamental research and defend the value of discovery of new knowledge as a requisite and critical element in societal progress. Governments and their agencies "invest considerable sums in the research enterprise," with the goal of long-term economic growth and societal benefits, the GRC says, adding that integrating fundamental research and innovation is not only a practical necessity but will also produce better outcomes. "A successful and vibrant research enterprise should succeed at both." Nations are called to increase their research and education capacity through, for example, staff exchange programs, workshops and institutional pairing. Tan Sri Zakri Abdul Hamid, Science Advisor to the Prime Minister of Malaysia, says it is no coincidence that, between 2000 and 2012, Malaysia's Gross Domestic Product per capita grew from US$ 4000 to almost $10,800 as national R&D investment rose from 0.5 to 1.13 percent of GDP. And while economic headwinds due to commodity prices this year have affected the growth of R&D funding in some countries, Malaysia included, it is important for all nations to invest even more, he says. "To meet the daunting challenges in decades to come, humanity has set and needs to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals. This requires ambitious national investments in science, technology and innovation, as well as basic science and science education and literacy. "We need innovation to accelerate the generation of energy from renewable sources, to improve the quality of our air and to make the fullest use of our precious fresh water resources, to create strong new building materials locally, to improve and protect health and agriculture through nanotechnology, and in so many other vital areas." "These challenges can best be met by combining the strengths of all nations and Malaysia extends its welcome and its highest support to the GRC and its efforts to maximize the effectiveness and efficiency of research collaborations and capabilities at the regional and global levels." "With the pace of economic development increasing worldwide, Malaysia aims to achieve R&D intensity of at least two percent by 2020, recognizing the importance of this investment to our well-being and future sustainability. R&D fuels innovation, sharpens our competitive advantage and enables us to create new industries and exploit new economic opportunities," says Dato' Azman Mahmud, chief executive officer of the Malaysian Investment Development Authority (MIDA), a conference keynote speaker. "As the principal investment promotion agency for the country, MIDA develops strong R&D linkages throughout the country, encouraging and nurturing partnerships. MIDA looks forward to the planting of powerful, creative ideas through this event." "The rise of international collaboration over the past two decades is dramatically increasing the impact and importance of research, and that success in turn is inspiring even greater funding of and cooperation among scientists," says senior professor Dato' Dr. Khalid Yusoff, vice-Chancellor and president, UCSI University, chairman of the organizing committee of the GRC Regional Meeting. "Successful research programs inevitably require fundamental research. Governments feel a growing need to demonstrate accountability and more immediate economic returns, however. How to resolve that tension and harmonise these two seemingly discrete targets is a primary focus of this important meeting in KL and we look forward to the discussions and recommendations."


Mubarak N.M.,University of Malaya | Mubarak N.M.,UCSI University | Sahu J.N.,University of Malaya | Abdullah E.C.,Malaysia Japan International Institute of Technology | Jayakumar N.S.,University of Malaya
Separation and Purification Reviews | Year: 2014

The discovery of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and the prospect of developing novel carbon-based nanomaterials have attracted researchers worldwide. CNTs have great potential as a novel type of adsorbent due to their unique properties such as chemical stability, mechanical and thermal stability, and the high surface area, which leads to various applications including hydrogen storage, protein purification and water treatment. Removal of heavy metals from industrial wastewater leads to the biggest challenge nowadays. To reduce environmental problems, the CNTs are promising candidates for the adsorption of heavy metals. In this study, extremely brief summaries of liquid pollutant purification are reviewed. © Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.


Fatokun O.,UCSI University
International Journal of Clinical Pharmacy | Year: 2014

Background: In Malaysia, antibacterial agents are among the most utilized drugs. There has been an increase in their use in recent years, contributing to an increase of antimicrobial resistance (AMR). Objectives: This study explores the pattern of antibiotic use and practices in a Malaysian community and identifies the variables associated with a likelihood of non-compliance with a course of antibiotic treatment. Setting: The study was conducted in Cheras, a community located to the south-east of Kuala Lumpur, the capital city of Malaysia. Method: A cross-sectional survey was conducted with 250 individuals, using an interviewer-administered questionnaire in Cheras, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Main outcome measures: Frequency of antibiotic use, sources of antibiotics, use of antibiotics without prescription, discontinuation of antibiotic treatment, antibiotic resistance awareness, handling of unused antibiotics, and association between respondents characteristics and compliance with a course of antibiotic treatment. Results: Approximately 36 % of the participants (n = 91) had taken antibiotics in the year of the study. The majority (66.8 %) obtained antibiotics from clinics. Almost 80 % of the participants had never obtained antibiotics without a doctor's prescription. Nearly 55 % discontinued the course of antibiotics once symptoms disappeared. The most common method of disposing leftover antibiotics was throwing them into the household rubbish bin (78.8 %). Only 6.4 % of participants returned leftover antibiotics to the pharmacist or doctor. Univariate analysis revealed that male gender (p = 0.04), lack of knowledge of antibiotic functions (p < 0.0001), and lack of awareness of antibiotic resistance (p < 0.0001) were all significantly associated with a greater likelihood of non-compliance with a full course of prescribed antibiotic treatment. Conclusion: Most individuals in the Malaysian community obtained antibiotics through prescription. Non-completion of a course of antibiotic treatment and improper disposal of unused antibiotics need to be addressed to prevent AMR. Male gender, lack of knowledge and awareness of antibiotics and resistance were significantly associated with a greater likelihood of non-compliance with a full course of prescribed antibiotic treatment. Therefore, patient education and counselling about antibiotics and antibacterial resistance is very important to enhance compliance to antibiotic therapy. © 2014 Koninklijke Nederlandse Maatschappij ter bevordering der Pharmacie.


Okechukwu N.P.,UCSI University
Asian Journal of Pharmaceutical and Clinical Research | Year: 2012

Coscinium fenestratum is from the family Menispermaceae, is a woody plant found in Southeast Asia. Our previous pharmacological investigation reported that the dichloromethane (DCM) stem extracts of this plant possessed antiulcer, anti-diabetic, anti-hypertensive, and anti-histamine and free radical scavenging properties. This study aims to partially purify the crude DCM stem extracts and to investigate the anti-diabetic activity of its individual fractions A-E on streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Free radical scavenging properties and phytochemical screening of the bioactive fraction E were also determined. Crude DCM extracts were partially purified using column chromatography techniques. Five fractions (A, B, C, D, and E) were obtained from crude DCM extracts and administered orally at a dose of 100 mg/kg on STZ-induced diabetic rats for 15 days. The blood glucose levels and the bodyweights of the diabetic rats were determined on day 1, 5, 10 and 15 of treatment. TPC was measured using 2.5ml of 10% FCR and 2ml of Na2 CO3 (2%w/v) was added to 0.5ml of each sample (3 replicates) of fraction E solution (1mg/ml) and determination of scavenging activity of DPPH free radical. One ml of 0.135 mM DPPH prepare in methanol was mixed with 1.0ml of fraction E ranging from 0.2-0.8 mg/ml. The data was compared statistically using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Fraction E significantly (p < 0.05) reduced blood glucose levels and increased the bodyweight of the experimental STZ-induced diabetic rats to 8.2 ± 0.7mmol/L and 422.52 ± 11.1 g compare to negative control 25.0 ± 1.8 mmol/L and 143.47 ± 13.5 g respectively. The phytochemical screening of fraction E revealed the presence of flavonoids. The total phenolic compounds present in fraction E was 256.67mg GAE/g dry weight and the radical scavenging activity of the fraction E was 21.71%. This fraction E possesses anti-diabetic and free radical scavenging properties. This effect might be as a result of the presence of flavonoids which has been widely reported to have anti-diabetic effects.


Keshavarzi F.,UCSI University
Medical Mycology Case Reports | Year: 2016

A 50-year-old male was prescribed with hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) after osteoarthritis was diagnosed. He had an old nail infection of Aspergillus niger. A remarkable improvement of the symptoms of fungal nail infection was seen after about four weeks of treatment with HCQ. It was very hard to detect the symptoms in the end of the second month of the treatment, both in the finger and toe nails. The symptoms were clearly recurred after HCQ was discontinued. © 2016 The Authors


Tan Y.P.,UCSI University | Chan E.W.C.,UCSI University
Food Bioscience | Year: 2014

In this study, the antioxidant, antityrosinase and antibacterial properties of fresh and processed leaves of Anacardium occidentale (cashew) and Piper betle (betel) were analysed and evaluated. For assessing antioxidant properties (AOP) of total phenolic content, total flavonoid content, caffeoylquinic acid content, free radical scavenging activity, ferric reducing power and ferrous ion chelating ability, the Folin-Ciocalteu, aluminium chloride, molybdate, DPPH radical scavenging, potassium ferricyanide and ferrozine assays were used, respectively. Antityrosinase and antibacterial properties were determined using the respective modified dopachrome method and disc-diffusion method. The outstanding AOP of fresh cashew leaves far exceeded those of betel leaves, including temperate culinary herbs of rosemary, thyme and marjoram. Blanching resulted in a significant decline in AOP of cashew and betel leaves with leaching of phenolic compounds into the blanching water. AOP of microwave-treated leaves of cashew remained unchanged but leaves of betel exhibited significant increase. Tyrosinase inhibition of fresh cashew leaves was high while betel leaves exhibited an enhancement of tyrosinase activities. Blanching did not affect the tyrosinase inhibition of cashew leaves but microwave treatment resulted in significant increase. For betel leaves, tyrosinase inhibition remained unchanged. Results showed that fresh cashew and betel leaves inhibited both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria tested. Blanched and microwave-treated cashew leaves exhibited strong antibacterial activity with those of betel leaves showed variable effects. Blanching water of cashew leaves also possesses antibacterial activity. The enhancement of tyrosinase activities of betel leaves, and leaching of bioactive compounds with antioxidant and antibacterial properties into the blanching water warrant further investigations. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.


Mjalli F.S.,Sultan Qaboos University | Ibrehem A.S.,UCSI University
Chemical Engineering Research and Design | Year: 2011

The dynamics of polymerization catalytic reactors have been investigated by many researchers during the past five decades; however, the emphasis of these studies was directed towards correlating process model parameters using empirical investigation based on small scale experimental setup and not on real process conditions. The resulting correlations are of limited practical use for industrial scale operations. A statistical study for the relative correlation of each of the effective process parameters revealed the best combination of parameters that could be used for optimizing the process model performance. Parameter estimation techniques are then utilized to find the values of these parameters that minimize a predefined objective function. Published real industrial scale data for the process was used as a basis for validating the process model. To generalize the model, an artificial neural network approach is used to capture the functional relationship of the selected parameters with the process operating conditions. The developed ANN-based correlation was used in a conventional fluidized catalytic bed reactor (FCR) model and simulated under industrial operating conditions. The new hybrid model predictions of the melt-flow index and the emulsion temperature were compared to industrial measurements as well as published models. The predictive quality of the hybrid model was superior to other models. The suggested parameter estimation and modeling approach can be used for process analysis and possible control system design and optimization investigations. © 2010 The Institution of Chemical Engineers.

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