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News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Certain blood vessels in the brainstem constrict when blood vessels elsewhere in the body would dilate. And that contrary behavior is what keeps us breathing, according to a new paper by UConn researchers published May 8 in eLife. If the body were a marching band, the brainstem would be the drum major. It keeps our heart beating and our lungs breathing in the essential rhythms of life. And just like a drum major, the job is more complex than it looks. If cellular waste products build up in the body, the brainstem has to jolt the lungs into action without disrupting other bodily functions, as surely as a drum major reins in a wayward woodwind section without losing the low brass. Neuroscientists studying the brainstem have focused on neurons, which are brain cells that send signals to one another and all over the body. But focusing just on the neurons in the brainstem is like staring only at the drum major's hands. Recently, neuroscientists have come to understand that astrocytes, cells once thought to simply provide structure to the brain, also release signaling molecules that regulate neurons' function. But until now, no one even considered the possibility that blood vessels may be similarly specialized. For more than a century, doctors and scientists have known that blood vessels dilate when cellular waste products like carbon dioxide build up. Widening the vessels allows fresh blood to flush through, carrying in oxygen and washing away the acidic carbon dioxide. This has been shown to be true throughout the body, and is standard dogma in undergraduate physiology classes. UConn physiologist Dan Mulkey was teaching exactly that to undergraduates one day when he realized that it couldn't possibly be true in a certain part of the brainstem. "I thought, wow. If that happened in the region of the brain I study, it would be counterproductive," Mulkey says. He studies the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN), a small region in the brainstem that controls breathing. He's shown in the past that RTN neurons respond to rising levels of carbon dioxide in the bloodstream by stimulating the lungs to breathe. But if the blood vessels in the RTN dilated in response to rising carbon dioxide the same way blood vessels do everywhere else, it would wash out that all-important signal, preventing cells in the RTN from doing their job driving us to breathe. It would be as if the drum major didn't notice the percussion section wandering off to left field. When Mulkey returned to the lab, he asked his team, including NIH postdoctoral fellow Virginia Hawkins, to see how blood vessels in thin slices of brainstem respond to carbon dioxide. And they saw it was indeed true - RTN blood vessels constricted when carbon dioxide levels rose. But blood vessels from slices of cortex (the wrinkled top part of the brain) dilated in response to high carbon dioxide, just like the rest of the body. But how did the blood vessels know to act differently in the RTN? Mulkey guessed that RTN astrocytes had something to do with it. He suspected that the astrocytes were releasing adenosine triphosphate (ATP), a small molecule cells can use to signal one another. And that was causing the RTN blood vessels to constrict. When they tested it, they found the hypothesis was correct. The astrocytes in the RTN were behaving differently than astrocytes anywhere else in the body. When these brainstem astrocytes detected high levels of carbon dioxide, they released ATP signaling to the neurons and blood vessels. When the researchers induced the astrocytes artificially to release ATP, they got the same results. Bathing the RTN blood vessels directly in ATP also caused them to constrict. Blocking ATP receptors blocked the ability of blood vessels to respond to carbon dioxide. When the team did the same experiments in live animals, they got the same results. Perhaps most importantly, manipulating blood vessels in the RTN actually influenced how animals breathe, thus linking regulation of blood vessel diameter to behavior. The majority of this research was done by UConn undergraduates, including Ashley Trinh, Colin Cleary, and Todd Dubreuil, as well as Elliot Rodriguez, a summer student in the National Science Foundation (NSF) Research Experience for Undergraduates in Physiology and Neurobiology program at UConn, who studies at Gettysburg College in Pennsylvania the rest of the year. The students' work uncovered a major discovery in neurophysiology. The work was funded in part by grants from the National Institutes of Health (HL104101 HL126381) and the Connecticut Department of Public Health (150263). "This is a big change in how we think about breathing," Mulkey says. And about blood vessels. Even in a single organ like the brain, the purpose of blood flow is not the same everywhere. Tailored responses in the RTN keep the body's drum major conducting, and let the band play on.


News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

Certain blood vessels in the brainstem constrict when blood vessels elsewhere in the body would dilate. And that contrary behavior is what keeps us breathing, according to a new paper by UConn researchers published May 8 in eLife. If the body were a marching band, the brainstem would be the drum major. It keeps our heart beating and our lungs breathing in the essential rhythms of life. And just like a drum major, the job is more complex than it looks. If cellular waste products build up in the body, the brainstem has to jolt the lungs into action without disrupting other bodily functions, as surely as a drum major reins in a wayward woodwind section without losing the low brass. Neuroscientists studying the brainstem have focused on neurons, which are brain cells that send signals to one another and all over the body. But focusing just on the neurons in the brainstem is like staring only at the drum major's hands. Recently, neuroscientists have come to understand that astrocytes, cells once thought to simply provide structure to the brain, also release signaling molecules that regulate neurons' function. But until now, no one even considered the possibility that blood vessels may be similarly specialized. For more than a century, doctors and scientists have known that blood vessels dilate when cellular waste products like carbon dioxide build up. Widening the vessels allows fresh blood to flush through, carrying in oxygen and washing away the acidic carbon dioxide. This has been shown to be true throughout the body, and is standard dogma in undergraduate physiology classes. UConn physiologist Dan Mulkey was teaching exactly that to undergraduates one day when he realized that it couldn't possibly be true in a certain part of the brainstem. "I thought, wow. If that happened in the region of the brain I study, it would be counterproductive," Mulkey says. He studies the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN), a small region in the brainstem that controls breathing. He's shown in the past that RTN neurons respond to rising levels of carbon dioxide in the bloodstream by stimulating the lungs to breathe. But if the blood vessels in the RTN dilated in response to rising carbon dioxide the same way blood vessels do everywhere else, it would wash out that all-important signal, preventing cells in the RTN from doing their job driving us to breathe. It would be as if the drum major didn't notice the percussion section wandering off to left field. When Mulkey returned to the lab, he asked his team, including NIH postdoctoral fellow Virginia Hawkins, to see how blood vessels in thin slices of brainstem respond to carbon dioxide. And they saw it was indeed true - RTN blood vessels constricted when carbon dioxide levels rose. But blood vessels from slices of cortex (the wrinkled top part of the brain) dilated in response to high carbon dioxide, just like the rest of the body. But how did the blood vessels know to act differently in the RTN? Mulkey guessed that RTN astrocytes had something to do with it. He suspected that the astrocytes were releasing adenosine triphosphate (ATP), a small molecule cells can use to signal one another. And that was causing the RTN blood vessels to constrict. When they tested it, they found the hypothesis was correct. The astrocytes in the RTN were behaving differently than astrocytes anywhere else in the body. When these brainstem astrocytes detected high levels of carbon dioxide, they released ATP signaling to the neurons and blood vessels. When the researchers induced the astrocytes artificially to release ATP, they got the same results. Bathing the RTN blood vessels directly in ATP also caused them to constrict. Blocking ATP receptors blocked the ability of blood vessels to respond to carbon dioxide. When the team did the same experiments in live animals, they got the same results. Perhaps most importantly, manipulating blood vessels in the RTN actually influenced how animals breathe, thus linking regulation of blood vessel diameter to behavior. The majority of this research was done by UConn undergraduates, including Ashley Trinh, Colin Cleary, and Todd Dubreuil, as well as Elliot Rodriguez, a summer student in the National Science Foundation (NSF) Research Experience for Undergraduates in Physiology and Neurobiology program at UConn, who studies at Gettysburg College in Pennsylvania the rest of the year. The students' work uncovered a major discovery in neurophysiology. The work was funded in part by grants from the National Institutes of Health (HL104101 HL126381) and the Connecticut Department of Public Health (150263). "This is a big change in how we think about breathing," Mulkey says. And about blood vessels. Even in a single organ like the brain, the purpose of blood flow is not the same everywhere. Tailored responses in the RTN keep the body's drum major conducting, and let the band play on.


News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

Certain blood vessels in the brainstem constrict when blood vessels elsewhere in the body would dilate. And that contrary behavior is what keeps us breathing, according to a new paper by UConn researchers published May 8 in eLife. If the body were a marching band, the brainstem would be the drum major. It keeps our heart beating and our lungs breathing in the essential rhythms of life. And just like a drum major, the job is more complex than it looks. If cellular waste products build up in the body, the brainstem has to jolt the lungs into action without disrupting other bodily functions, as surely as a drum major reins in a wayward woodwind section without losing the low brass. Neuroscientists studying the brainstem have focused on neurons, which are brain cells that send signals to one another and all over the body. But focusing just on the neurons in the brainstem is like staring only at the drum major's hands. Recently, neuroscientists have come to understand that astrocytes, cells once thought to simply provide structure to the brain, also release signaling molecules that regulate neurons' function. But until now, no one even considered the possibility that blood vessels may be similarly specialized. For more than a century, doctors and scientists have known that blood vessels dilate when cellular waste products like carbon dioxide build up. Widening the vessels allows fresh blood to flush through, carrying in oxygen and washing away the acidic carbon dioxide. This has been shown to be true throughout the body, and is standard dogma in undergraduate physiology classes. UConn physiologist Dan Mulkey was teaching exactly that to undergraduates one day when he realized that it couldn't possibly be true in a certain part of the brainstem. "I thought, wow. If that happened in the region of the brain I study, it would be counterproductive," Mulkey says. He studies the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN), a small region in the brainstem that controls breathing. He's shown in the past that RTN neurons respond to rising levels of carbon dioxide in the bloodstream by stimulating the lungs to breathe. But if the blood vessels in the RTN dilated in response to rising carbon dioxide the same way blood vessels do everywhere else, it would wash out that all-important signal, preventing cells in the RTN from doing their job driving us to breathe. It would be as if the drum major didn't notice the percussion section wandering off to left field. When Mulkey returned to the lab, he asked his team, including NIH postdoctoral fellow Virginia Hawkins, to see how blood vessels in thin slices of brainstem respond to carbon dioxide. And they saw it was indeed true - RTN blood vessels constricted when carbon dioxide levels rose. But blood vessels from slices of cortex (the wrinkled top part of the brain) dilated in response to high carbon dioxide, just like the rest of the body. But how did the blood vessels know to act differently in the RTN? Mulkey guessed that RTN astrocytes had something to do with it. He suspected that the astrocytes were releasing adenosine triphosphate (ATP), a small molecule cells can use to signal one another. And that was causing the RTN blood vessels to constrict. When they tested it, they found the hypothesis was correct. The astrocytes in the RTN were behaving differently than astrocytes anywhere else in the body. When these brainstem astrocytes detected high levels of carbon dioxide, they released ATP signaling to the neurons and blood vessels. When the researchers induced the astrocytes artificially to release ATP, they got the same results. Bathing the RTN blood vessels directly in ATP also caused them to constrict. Blocking ATP receptors blocked the ability of blood vessels to respond to carbon dioxide. When the team did the same experiments in live animals, they got the same results. Perhaps most importantly, manipulating blood vessels in the RTN actually influenced how animals breathe, thus linking regulation of blood vessel diameter to behavior. The majority of this research was done by UConn undergraduates, including Ashley Trinh, Colin Cleary, and Todd Dubreuil, as well as Elliot Rodriguez, a summer student in the National Science Foundation (NSF) Research Experience for Undergraduates in Physiology and Neurobiology program at UConn, who studies at Gettysburg College in Pennsylvania the rest of the year. The students' work uncovered a major discovery in neurophysiology. The work was funded in part by grants from the National Institutes of Health (HL104101 HL126381) and the Connecticut Department of Public Health (150263). "This is a big change in how we think about breathing," Mulkey says. And about blood vessels. Even in a single organ like the brain, the purpose of blood flow is not the same everywhere. Tailored responses in the RTN keep the body's drum major conducting, and let the band play on.


News Article | May 12, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Get up and move! UConn study finds any exercise is good exercise when it comes to boosting your mood You don't have to spend hours at the gym or work up a dripping sweat to improve your mood and feel better about yourself, researchers at the University of Connecticut say in a new study. If you lead a sedentary lifestyle -- spending large parts of your day sitting at home or at work - simply getting out of your chair and moving around can reduce depression and lift your spirits. "We hope this research helps people realize the important public health message that simply going from doing no physical activity to performing some physical activity can improve their subjective well-being," says Gregory Panza, a graduate student in UConn's Department of Kinesiology and the study's lead author. "What is even more promising for the physically inactive person is that they do not need to exercise vigorously to see these improvements," Panza continues. "Instead, our results indicate you will get the best 'bang for your buck' with light or moderate intensity physical activity." For those keeping score, light physical activity is the equivalent of taking a leisurely walk around the mall with no noticeable increase in breathing, heart rate, or sweating, says Distinguished Kinesiology Professor Linda Pescatello, senior researcher on the project. Moderate intensity activity is equivalent to walking a 15-20-minute mile with an increase in breathing, heart rate, and sweating, yet still being able to carry on a conversation. Vigorous activity is equivalent to a very brisk walk or jogging a 13-minute mile with a very noticeable increase in breathing, heart rate, and sweating to the point of being unable to maintain a conversation. The study looked at 419 generally healthy middle-aged adults who wore accelerometers on their hips to track physical activity over four days. Participants also completed a series of questionnaires asking them to describe their daily exercise habits, psychological well-being, depression level, pain severity, and extent to which pain interfered with their daily activities. The last finding is actually good news for folks who enjoy hard, calorie-burning workouts, as it doesn't support a widely reported recent study that found high intensity workouts significantly lowered some people's sense of well-being. "Recent studies had suggested a slightly unsettling link between vigorous activity and subjective well-being," says Beth Taylor, associate professor of kinesiology and another member of the research team. "We did not find this in the current study, which is reassuring to individuals who enjoy vigorous activity and may be worried about negative effects." Many previous studies have attempted to identify the best exercise regimen to improve people's sense of well-being. Yet no clear consensus has emerged. Some studies say moderate or vigorous activity is best. Others say low intensity exercise is better. The differences, the UConn researchers say, may be due to the way the studies were designed and possible limitations in how people's well-being and levels of physical activity were measured. The UConn study is believed to be the first of its kind to use both objective (accelerometers) and subjective (questionnaires) measurements within a single group to examine the relationship between physical activity intensity and well-being. Yet the UConn research also has its limits, Panza says. All of the individuals who participated in the UConn study had a generally positive sense of well-being going into the project and were generally physically active. So their answers in the questionnaires need to be framed in that context. Whether the same results would hold true for people with lower subjective well-being or lower levels of physical activity is unknown, Panza says. Also, the conclusions formed in the UConn study are based on information gathered at a single point in time. A longitudinal study that tracks people's feelings and physical activity over time would go a long way toward helping determine what exercise regimen might be best for different populations, Panza said. "If it doesn't make us feel good, we don't want to do it," says Taylor. "Establishing the link between different types, doses, and intensities of physical activity on well-being is a very important step in encouraging more people to exercise." The study was published in the Journal of Health Psychology in February.


News Article | May 19, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Construct-A-Lead, the industry’s most comprehensive construction lead service, announces the following hotel projects will go forward. Construct-A-Lead’s newly implemented advanced search feature allows the user to find their leads or key contacts by project type, location, bid stage, dollar value, company, or keyword. Users are able to track projects status, save searches, put personalized notes on projects, email a project to a colleague or customer, reach out directly to the decision maker and download construction leads with a one-touch feature. Interested parties are invited to visit Construct-A-Lead.com and sign up for a no obligation test drive, where they will be able to experience these newly integrated features. Users will be able to receive regular alerts on new and updated construction projects, in accordance with the individual’s preference. An example of the hotel projects available within the database is listed below. Reference the Project ID to utilize the new site features and to obtain direct contact information for each construction lead: Vienna, VA – The View at Tysons - Plans call for the new construction of a 2.8M SF mixed-use development to include a 48-story tower composed of 840K SF of condos, 412K SF of hotel and 44K SF of retail, including an open-air shopping plaza. Construction start: Q1, Q2, 2018, $1,300,000,000. Project ID: 1392353 Los Angeles, CA – 1020 South Figueroa – Plans call for the demolition of the nine-story Luxe City Center Hotel and the new construction of up to 1,129,284 square feet (sf) of floor area. The Project would include a total of up to 300 hotel rooms, 650 residential condominium units, and 80,000 sf of restaurant, retail, and other commercial uses. Construction start: Q2, Q3, 2018, $600,000,000 Project ID: 1392117 Carol Stream, IL – WoodSpring Suites – Plans call for the new construction of a 123 room hotel. Construction start: Q4, 2017, Q1, 2018. $15,000,000 Project ID: 1392307 Las Vegas, NV – Flamingo Hotel - Plans call for the extensive renovation of 1,270 rooms at Flamingo Las Vegas. Construction start: August, 2017. $90,000,000 Project ID: 1392298 Storrs, CT – UConn Hotel – Plans call for the demolition of the existing student housing development - Mansfield Apartments, and the new construction of a 100 +/- room hotel. Construction start: Q4, 2018, Q1, 2019. $20,000,000. Project ID: 1392234 Charlotte, NC - Hampton Inn & Suites – Plans call for the new construction of a 6 story, 141 room hotel with a fitness area and parking. Construction start: Q4, 2017, Q1, 2018. $18,000,000. Project ID: 1392147 Construct-A-Lead is an online database that connects users to large-scale commercial construction projects, including those hidden, private project leads. The service features hotel construction, office buildings, retail construction, medical facilities, school renovations and much more, to help bid on construction including those hard-to-find private project leads, from planning stage through completion. Construct-A-Lead’s daily updates of commercial construction project leads are an ideal solution for those who want to put their product or service into commercial, government and religious structures. For more information, visit Construct-A-Lead.com online or call 855-874-1491.


News Article | May 23, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

Johns Hopkins Genomics at The Johns Hopkins University, Georgia Cancer Center at Augusta University, CID Research, Progenity, Inc., DarwinHealth, Inc., and Channing Division of Network Medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital Among New Qumulo Customers; Qumulo Reports More Than 2X Growth in Petabytes Shipped to Life Sciences and Medical Research Customers in 12 Months SEATTLE, WA--(Marketwired - May 23, 2017) - Qumulo, the leader in modern scale-out storage, today announced that leading life sciences and medical research institutions are choosing Qumulo to accelerate their data-intensive workflows, including cancer and infectious disease research, genomics, bioinformatics, proteomics, microscopy and big data. Johns Hopkins Genomics (including the NIH CIDR Program at The Johns Hopkins University), the Center for Infectious Disease Research, Georgia Cancer Center at Augusta University, Channing Division of Network Medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital, Progenity, Inc., and DarwinHealth, Inc. have joined the rapidly growing number of customers turning to Qumulo to speed discovery of new medical breakthroughs. "Workflows in life sciences are characterized by massive volumes of machine-generated file data pipelined into downstream processes for analysis," said Peter Godman, co-founder and CTO of Qumulo. "The rapid growth of file-based storage and processing requirements compounded by limited IT resources has created a scalability crisis for life sciences and medical research organizations. Efficient, high-performance processing of file-based data is at the heart of innovation and discovery in life sciences -- something legacy file storage cannot provide. Qumulo has become the clear answer for data-intensive life sciences workflows." Qumulo accelerates data-intensive workflows in life science and medical research including cancer and infectious disease research and microscopy. Analysis of tissue and cancer tumor studies generates millions to billions of small files, and the expanding bio-repository file data requirements are outgrowing the capacity of legacy storage. Qumulo's modern scale-out storage provides researchers with faster analysis times and IT staff with real-time visibility and control at scale. The high performing, cost-effective storage platform allows for a single file system to be shared across groups to prevent long wait times previously associated with sharing large data sets among groups. Qumulo is the modern replacement for legacy scale-out storage architectures that cannot keep up with modern data requirements. Ron Hood, director of IT at the Center for Infectious Disease Research said, "Qumulo Core's modern architecture is built for the future and that's what closed the deal for us. We didn't want to spend our budget on legacy scale-out storage systems that are obsolete or will be in two to three years. Qumulo supports our needs today and well into the future, so that we can achieve faster times to analysis for our most critical research." Microscopy systems often generate image data sets as large as 1TB per experiment. Those images are stored and accessed for processing and analysis from client computers running operating systems such as Windows, macOS and Linux. The sequencing data is a widely varied collection of files ranging in size from a few kilobytes, often numbering in the millions to billions, up to large image files that can be 50 GB each. Qumulo is the ideal solution for this workload, providing high scalability, high performance, fast access to files across the entire range for processing and analysis, storage of billions of files and support for mixed file workloads. Qumulo Core was designed from the ground up for the new era of multi-petabyte data scale on premises and in the cloud. Qumulo Core stores tens of billions of files with scalable throughput and is the only product that provides real-time visibility and control for file systems at petabyte scale. Storage administrators and life sciences researchers can instantly see usage, activity and throughput at any level of the unified directory structure, no matter how many files in the file system, allowing them to pinpoint problems and effectively manage how storage is used by analysis pipelines. In addition, a Qumulo Core storage cluster can be installed and deployed in minutes without specialized IT expertise. Qumulo's publicly announced life sciences customers include: Carnegie Institution for Science, CID Research, Channing Division of Network Medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital, DarwinHealth, Inc., Georgia Cancer Center at Augusta University, Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) at University of Washington, Johns Hopkins Genomics at The Johns Hopkins University, Progenity, Inc., UConn Health, University of Utah Scientific Computing and Imaging (SCI) Institute. Connect with Qumulo at Bio-IT World Qumulo will be featured in booth #333 at Bio-IT World, taking place May 23-25 in Boston. The company will sponsor, exhibit, and demonstrate the power of Qumulo Core for life sciences workflows. In addition, Peter Godman, the company's co-founder and CTO, will present on Kickstarting Breakthroughs in Life Sciences with Intelligent, Next-Generation Scale-Out Storage on Thursday, May 25 at 11:40am ET. To schedule one-on-one meetings with Qumulo representatives at Bio-IT World, send an email to info@qumulo.com or schedule online here. Suggested Tweet: Life Sciences and Medical Research Turning to @Qumulo For Modern Scale-Out File #Storage http://qumulo.com/4061 About Qumulo Qumulo enables enterprises to manage and store billions of digital assets with real-time visibility and control built directly into the file system. Going past the design limitations of legacy NAS, Qumulo Core is modern scale-out storage for the new era of multi-petabyte data footprints on premises and in the cloud. It is used by the leaders of data-intensive industries. Founded in 2012 by the inventors of scale-out NAS, Qumulo has attracted a world-class team of innovators, investors and partners. For more information, visit www.qumulo.com.


WATERLOO, ON--(Marketwired - March 01, 2017) - Client Outlook, a leading provider of FDA Class II diagnostic and clinical image viewing solutions, announced today that Connecticut Children's Medical Center will be using eUnity as its enterprise image viewing platform. Connecticut Children's is a not-for-profit hospital, providing pediatric services in more than 30 specialties. eUnity will be providing images to clinicians located throughout Connecticut and Massachusetts. "Finding a replacement for our enterprise clinical image viewer was not easy. To ensure we made the right decision, we were diligent and specific in our methodology and our requirements," said Jung Park, Senior Director of Information Services, Connecticut Children's Medical Center. "We evaluated three vendors in detail and looked beyond the technical requirements. Provider requirements and building a long-term partnership were critical components. eUnity is a robust and flexible product, whose features and functionality exceeded our needs. Within the first hour of the proof of concept, our providers were impressed with eUnity's performance. We were pleased with how easy it was to provide access to our users that were located both within and outside our organization." Park adds, "When working with Client Outlook, we found the open dialogue to be refreshing. Client Outlook's team members were adaptable throughout our evaluation process and their high confidence in eUnity was reflected in their candid approach. We are pleased to have chosen Client Outlook as our partner and eUnity as our image viewing platform." "We are very excited to be implementing eUnity at Connecticut Children's Medical Center. Our focus and dedication on creating the best diagnostic image viewing platform is reflected in all facets of eUnity," said Brenda Rankin, Executive Vice President, Client Outlook. "We have developed a solution that is robust, easy to implement, simple to use, and feature rich. With this implementation, we are making a difference in the lives of children and their families, something that is important to me and our team. Connecticut Children's is a wonderful organization that is improving the physical and emotional health of children, and we are pleased to be part of this journey." Connecticut Children's Medical Center is the only hospital in Connecticut dedicated exclusively to the care of children. Connecticut Children's is a nationally recognized not-for-profit with a medical staff of more than 1,000 providing comprehensive, world-class health care in more than 30 pediatric specialties and subspecialties. Connecticut Children's Medical Center is the primary pediatric teaching hospital for the UConn School of Medicine, has a teaching partnership with the Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine at Quinnipiac University and is a research partner of Jackson Laboratory. Connecticut Children's Office for Community Child Health is a national leader in community-based prevention and wellness programs. http://www.connecticutchildrens.org/ Client Outlook is an innovative healthcare technology company who designs imaging solutions that ultimately save people's lives. Driven by our own personal healthcare experiences, we challenge ourselves every day to develop and deliver the most practical, useful and secure diagnostic, clinical and mobility solution for physicians and frontline healthcare professionals -- right where healthcare happens. For more information about our company and our eUnity™ product suite, visit us on the web at www.clientoutlook.com.


News Article | February 27, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

HARTFORD, Conn., Feb. 27, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The Connecticut Technology Council (CTC) is pleased to announce the 50 women who have been selected as Women of Innovation finalists for the 2017 Women of Innovation awards program. The Women of Innovation® program seeks to celebrate and create a growing network of women in the “trenches” of STEM. Finalists are the scientists, researchers, academics, manufacturers, student leaders, drafters, entrepreneurs, and technicians who create tomorrow’s advancements through their efforts in Connecticut today. The 50 finalists will be recognized at the Women of Innovation® awards gala at the Aqua Turf Club in Plantsville on March 29 from 5 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. A winner in each of the eight award categories will be announced live during the program. The keynote speaker at this year’s ceremony is Adda Birnir, Founder and CEO of Skillcrush, a woman-centric online learning community that helps advance digital skills and creativity, and has been featured on the BBC, Mashable, Fast Company, and Business Insider. Tickets, registration, and details are available online at the CTC website, www.CT.org. The complete list of 2017 Women of Innovation® Finalists is posted below. “For the last twelve years, the Women of Innovation awards ceremony has honored outstanding women who have made significant professional, academic, and community achievements,” said Bruce Carlson, President and CEO of the Connecticut Technology Council. “The 2017 Women of Innovation awards dinner will continue our tradition of celebrating these women and their accomplishments, and marks our expanding program offerings to include and professional growth opportunities to all involved with Women of Innovation, a move aligned with the Connecticut Technology Council’s new strategic initiatives. These initiatives work to fill clear needs in the tech ecosystem here in the state.” The Women of Innovation® program is aligned with CTC’s Talent & Workforce strategic initiative, which is dedicated to bringing a robust tech talent pipeline to Connecticut. Diversity hiring is a significant facet of the Talent & Workforce initiative. Other initiatives include Growth & Innovation, dedicated to serving companies in the growth phase, and the IT & Infrastructure initiative, which focuses on supporting and advocating for the best in tech resources and infrastructure here in Connecticut. Women of Innovation® finalists are nominated by their peers, coworkers, and mentors, and are selected based on their professional experience, history of innovation, ability to think creatively and solve problems, and demonstration of leadership. Students are judged on inventiveness, accomplishment in science and technology, independent research, and academic achievement. This year’s 50 finalists includes researchers, educators, engineers, managers, students and entrepreneurs who work or study biotech, pharmaceuticals, software, computer hardware, advanced materials, medical devices, IT, or associated fields. High school, undergraduate and graduate students who have demonstrated extraordinary and unique achievements in their technology disciplines are also among the finalists. The winner in the Youth Innovation and Leadership category will receive a $4,000 scholarship from Medtronic, one of the program’s presenting sponsors. Women of Innovation® is presented in conjunction with the following companies: Day Pitney LLP, Medtronic Inc, and United Technologies Corporation. The program is supported by Pfizer Inc. and Pitney Bowes Inc., with contributions from Premier Limousine and Marcum LLP. For questions regarding the program or awards dinner please contact Paige Rasid at 860.289.0878 x335. Below is a list of the 2017 Women of Innovation® with their affiliated organizations and town of employment or hometown: Jennifer McFadden, Yale University, Madison Summer McGee, University of New Haven, West Haven Janice Naegele, Wesleyan University, Middletown Michelle Bellinger, Academy of Aerospace & Engineering, West Hartford Nivea Torres, Connecticut Technical High School System (CTHSS), Middletown Jun Chen, University of Connecticut, School of Engineering, Storrs Deborah Dorcemus, University of Connecticut, Danbury Erin Duffy, Yale University, West Haven Wafa Elmannai, University of Bridgeport, Bridgeport Manisha Mishra, University of Connecticut, Storrs Jessica Angier, Hybrid Intelligence, Inc., Shelton                                Jessica Bailey, Greenworks Lending, Darien Wendy Davis, GestVision, Inc., Guilford Marcia Fournier, Bioarray Genetics, Farmington Ellen Matloff, My Gene Counsel, LLC, North Haven Melissa Baran, Sikorsky Aircraft, A Lockheed Martin Company, Stratford Vicki Conant, Sikorsky Aircraft, A Lockheed Martin Company, Stratford Jennifer Graham, Sikorsky Aircraft, A Lockheed Martin Company, Stratford Karen Iannella, Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Ridgefield Jacqueline Jones, PhD., Medtronic, Branford Bhagyashree Khunte, Pfizer, Inc., Groton Jeanne Larsen, UTC Aerospace Systems, Windsor Locks Ping Liu, Sikorsky Aircraft, A Lockheed Martin Company, Stratford Devu Manikantan Shila, Ph.D, United Technologies Research Center, East Hartford Jennifer McLaurin, UTC Aerospace Systems, Windsor Locks Lindsay O'Donnell, Sikorsky Aircraft, A Lockheed Martin Company, Naugatuck Kremena Simitchieva, Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Ridgefield Susan Baserga, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven Jinbo Bi, University of Connecticut, Storrs Alison Gotkin, United Technologies Research Center, East Hartford Nancy Petry, UConn Health, Farmington Danyel Racenet, Medtronic, North Haven Kelly Valentine, Medtronic, North Haven Christine Wetzel, 3M, Meriden Margaret Bailey, Sonalysts, Waterford Jeanine Gouin, Milone & MacBroom, Inc., Cheshire Chun Li, Diameter Health, Farmington Mary Ellen Mateleska, Mystic Aquarium, a division of Sea Research Foundation, Mystic Feliciatas Thurmayr, MD, PhD., Quality Health Ideas, Inc., Suffield Meghan West, CNC Software Inc /Mastercam, Tolland The Connecticut Technology Council is a statewide association of technology oriented companies and institutions, providing leadership in areas of policy advocacy, community building and assistance for growing companies. Speaking for over 2,000 companies that employ some 200,000 residents, the Connecticut Technology Council seeks to provide a strong and urgent voice in support of the creation of a culture of innovation. This includes working to position Connecticut as a leader in idea creation, workforce preparation, entrepreneurial aptitude, early stage risk capital availability and providing on-going support and mentoring to high potential firms. For more information, visit www.ct.org.


News Article | March 1, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The V Foundation for Cancer Research, a top-rated cancer research charity, announces fundraising initiatives beginning this month. Coinciding with college basketball’s championship season, ESPN, Constellation Brands Beer Division, Constellation Wines and Apple Gold Group will celebrate the late Jim Valvano’s “Don’t Give Up . . . Don’t Ever Give Up!”® spirit by offering numerous ways for supporters dedicated to declaring victory over cancer to get involved. Contributions from these partnerships will strategically fund emerging, high-impact research opportunities to make the greatest advances in the shortest amount of time as part of the V Foundation’s Not a Moment to Lose $200 million capital campaign. “The V Foundation is more passionate than ever about the course set by Jim and ESPN 24 years ago,” said Susan Braun, CEO of the V Foundation. “We are driven to put an end to cancer through cutting-edge research.” As one of 14 icons to be honored in this year’s class of Atlantic Coast Conference Basketball Legends, Valvano continues to inspire nearly 25 years after his iconic ESPY Awards speech when the V Foundation for Cancer Research was first announced. Valvano’s legacy has affected, and will continue to affect, millions of people around the world as the V Foundation transforms the prevention, detection and treatment of cancer by accelerating the pace of scientific progress. Remembering Valvano through philanthropy, the V Foundation has an all-star group of partners eager to support its cause this spring. This year, the V Foundation will be featured within ESPN’s Tournament Challenge mobile application and web game during the 2017 NCAA Division I Men’s Basketball Tournament. When fans log in to fill out their brackets and throughout the tournament, they will have the ability to donate to the V Foundation and enter for a chance to win an all-expense paid trip to the 2017 Jimmy V Classic at Madison Square Garden in New York, which will pit UConn against Syracuse and Gonzaga against Villanova in a blueblood doubleheader on December 5. The prize package includes two tickets, airfare, accommodations, a signed basketball from all four coaches and a $400 gift card. To enter the sweepstakes, please visit http://www.v.org/win. No donation is necessary to win. Constellation Brands Beer Division’s promotion, “You Love the Game … Now Join the Fight,” marks the seventh year of fundraising for the V Foundation. From March 1 to April 3, Constellation Brands Beer Division will make a donation to the V Foundation for each purchased case of Corona Extra or Corona Light. Last year’s efforts raised more than $1.26 million for cancer research. The wine division of Constellation, Constellation Wines, will also include signage promoting its support of the V Foundation on its top-selling Woodbridge wines throughout March. Last year, Constellation Wines donated $40,000 to fund cutting-edge research. Additionally, from March 7 to April 3, guests at 52 Apple Gold Group-owned Applebee’s restaurants across North Carolina will be invited to participate in the 11th annual March Hoops Fundraiser. For each $1 donation, fans will receive a paper basketball to decorate in spirit of their favorite team participating in the national championship. Since 2006, Apple Gold Group has raised more than $1.3 million for the V Foundation through the March Hoops Fundraiser and other initiatives. The V Foundation recently announced its Not a Moment to Lose fundraising campaign with a goal to raise $200 million by 2020 and further the momentum behind today’s extraordinary research. Through its partners, like ESPN, Constellation Brands, Apple Gold Group and many others, as well as its generous donors that help bring Valvano’s mission to life, the V Foundation has already raised nearly $120 million towards that goal. For more information about the V Foundation for Cancer Research and how to get involved, please visit http://www.jimmyv.org. About the V Foundation for Cancer Research: The V Foundation for Cancer Research is dedicated to declaring victory over cancer. It was founded in 1993 by ESPN and the late Jim Valvano, legendary North Carolina State Basketball coach and ESPN commentator. Since 1993, the Foundation has funded more than $170 million in cancer research grants nationwide. It awards 100 percent of all direct cash donations to cancer research and related programs. Due to generous donors, the Foundation has an endowment that covers administrative expenses. Not a Moment to Lose, its boldest fundraising campaign to date, aims to raise $200 million for cancer research by 2020 to help transform the prevention, detection and treatment of cancer. The Foundation awards peer-reviewed grants through a competitive awards process vetted by a world-renowned Scientific Advisory Committee. For more information on the V Foundation, please visit http://www.jimmyv.org.


News Article | February 27, 2017
Site: www.labdesignnews.com

The department of Physics will remain in Gant, and much of the Biological Life Sciences will consolidate from multiple locations to new state-of-the-art classrooms, teaching and research laboratories, lecture halls, faculty offices, support spaces and student amenities. Following a rigorous selection process, the university engaged a joint venture team: Goody Clancy of Boston partnered with Mitchell Giurgola of New York. In their interview, the team demonstrated enthusiasm for tackling the big issues: • A very large complicated project • Phased construction • Building occupancy during construction • Energy and infrastructure upgrades • Making science “visible” First, the team set out to understand the challenges of the building—with the goal of turning them into opportunities. As they began their work, they asked difficult questions. How do you best serve the students, faculty, staff and visitors of the university? How do you breathe new life into an antiquated building? How do you gain functional space in an existing building when you can’t expand the footprint? What’s the most appropriate use of State University dollars? “Invest in programmatic and functional goals first,” stated Laura Cruickshank, FAIA (UConn’s Master Planner and Chief Architect). “As a state institution, we are not immune to budget deficits and fiscal cuts.” Regarding limited available floor area, Jim Braddock of Mitchell Giurgola stated, “It was necessary to build consensus on space needs and configuration both within and among departments. This was accomplished through consideration of numerous alternatives in many meetings with representatives of the departments, the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (CLAS), Facilities, University Planning, Design and Construction (UPDC) and the design team.” So what defines this place? The Gant complex is massive, rigid and orthogonal. Wayfinding is confusing; the existing spaces are not comfortable for users and visitors. The exterior envelope is compromised. The building has exceeded its useful life. How can such a facility be reimagined? Successful adaptive reuse projects are transformative, building on a strong foundation and structure—literally as well as figuratively. Reinvention must go back to basics. The key goal is to turn the unfortunate into the excellent. UConn and its design team began to ask more specific questions: • What does the facility lack? • What level of science can the building support? • How can the building be made more functional and efficient? • What are the priorities for redevelopment? • How can wayfinding be improved? • How can the renovated facility be more inviting—a focal point for student involvement? • How can a limited budget be applied for maximum effect? • How can redevelopment support the master plan and academic vision goals? Development of design ideas showcase the collective spirit of the university’s STEM initiatives physically, functionally and spiritually. Continuous dialoguebetween conceptual ideas, contextual constraints and budget considerations shaped the ultimate design concept. Central themes began to emerge.

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