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There’s a whole lot more to colon cancer prevention than just colonoscopy. A key here is understanding the progression of the cancer and polyps developing before it, according to experts. An important first step here is colonoscopy, but the condition still demands a larger, more comprehensive prevention plan. Dr. Joel Levine, who co-founded the Colon Cancer Prevention Program of UConn Health, harped on the interaction of three broad areas in better understanding colon cancer. "The key is the interaction of three broad areas: insulin biology, inflammation biology, and the billions of species of bacteria in the colon, the microbiome,” he said in a UConn report. Insulin biology is anything that affects insulin levels, insulin-linked proteins, as well as insulin resistance. Such are risk factors collectively known as metabolic syndrome and cover risk factors such as obesity, diabetes, and a sedentary lifestyle. Cellular inflammation is an invisible process for the patient, and it often signals a bacterial shift in the colon. Plenty of inflammatory signaling, Levine explained, leads to damage to one’s genes, DNA, and other cellular elements. It could set the stage for more mutations, which could result in the development of colon polyps with their own specific history. Changes in one’s microbiome, composed of the billions of species in one’s gut and body, are linked to certain outcomes such as colon cancer. “Further evidence has demonstrated a relationship between specific bacteria and specific molecular pathways for colon polyps,” Levine added. Colonoscopy identifies most polyps, yet recognizes inflammation as well as bacterial changes can offer red flags before actual polyp formation. And while this detection tool is crucial, it is also deemed a must to lower a person’s risk profile in between colonoscopies. Levine said, for instance, that they have not seen a colon cancer case in patients they follow in their risk identification and reduction program in the last five years. This also takes into account the fact that under normal circumstances, there is up to a 10-year interval for polyps to form, so regular monitoring proves critical. Their center tracks molecular-level changes between colonoscopies via a form of the fecal immunochemical test, which is tasked to measure protein in blood in a stool sample in billionths of one gram. According to colorectal surgeon Dr. Jitesh Patel, colorectal cancer is around 90 percent treatable when discovered in the earliest stages. “While a colonoscopy may not be a fun experience, it could save your life,” he wrote in a commentary, highlighting this diagnostic tool is recommended for everyone starting age 50 or much younger if one is high-risk. Blacks, for one, should be screened at 45 years old or younger. The American Cancer Society noted that colorectal cancer emerges as the third leading cause of death related to cancer in the United States. But while it generally affects people in their 50s, a new report warned that colon and rectal cancers are on the rise among young adults. And the condition has “very, very subtle” signs and symptoms, earning it the title of being an invisible disease. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | April 4, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

A newly retired woman from Harwinton was looking for ways to get fit, so she got herself a Fitbit fitness device to help her track her daily steps and guide her toward her desired weight loss and health goals. Little did 73-year-old Patricia Lauder know that her Fitbit would actually do more than keep her fit: it will also save her life. Lauder recalled that for a number of weeks, she had not been feeling well. “[I] thought I might be battling a bad cold or walking pneumonia that I just couldn’t kick,” she said in a UConn Today report, adding that medical tests, X-rays, and other lab work actually came back negative for any health concern. She then began to felt fatigue as well as shortness of breath, where walking short distances proved to be a chore. Her Fitbit was also telling her an unusual story: her usual resting heart rate of 68 to 70 beats per minute increased by the day by five points. One day it just climbed to 140 bpm, she recalled. That was when Lauder phoned 911 and asked the ambulance to take her to UConn Health. At the emergency department, a CT scan revealed two large blood clots in her lung arteries. Called pulmonary embolisms, the clots were stressing her heart and lungs, as her lung artery pressure shot to 65 from the normal 25 and her heart was enlarged due to being overworked. According to Dr. JuYong Lee, who applied clot-busting medications directly into the clots via a catheter, the mortality rate of pulmonary embolisms is over 30 percent once it becomes massive. The clots can over-pressurize one’s heart and lead one’s blood pressure and oxygen level to significantly drop. Its largest risk factor: deep vein thrombosis, where a blood clot forms in a vein (often in one’s leg) and potentially travels up to the lungs. Lauder’s procedure was fortunately a minimally invasive one, and within a 24-hour post-operation, the clots disappeared and her heart and lung function resumed to normal. “I had the procedure on Friday, removed the catheter on Saturday and was home Monday evening,” the patient shared. Lauder credited her Fitbit for its life-saving role in this frightening event, saying she has no way of knowing her heart rate was getting riskily high if she didn’t have the device on her wrist. The doctor echoed her thoughts, calling the condition very critical and potentially leading to death without prompt medical attention. In early March, Tech Times reported that Fitbit has launched a new product called Fitbit Alta HR, an update to the previous Alta and touted to be the slimmest wrist-based device in the world and with a full-time heart rate sensor to boot. The renowned wearable gadget company made the watch thinner through reducing the chip’s size as well as the number of components. The smart watch is designed to be a quarter slimmer than the Fitbit Charge 2. Its innovation is a continuous, on-the-go heart rate tracking feature paired with PurePulse heart rate technology, which offers daylong heart tracking for important related health information. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


WATERLOO, ON--(Marketwired - March 01, 2017) - Client Outlook, a leading provider of FDA Class II diagnostic and clinical image viewing solutions, announced today that Connecticut Children's Medical Center will be using eUnity as its enterprise image viewing platform. Connecticut Children's is a not-for-profit hospital, providing pediatric services in more than 30 specialties. eUnity will be providing images to clinicians located throughout Connecticut and Massachusetts. "Finding a replacement for our enterprise clinical image viewer was not easy. To ensure we made the right decision, we were diligent and specific in our methodology and our requirements," said Jung Park, Senior Director of Information Services, Connecticut Children's Medical Center. "We evaluated three vendors in detail and looked beyond the technical requirements. Provider requirements and building a long-term partnership were critical components. eUnity is a robust and flexible product, whose features and functionality exceeded our needs. Within the first hour of the proof of concept, our providers were impressed with eUnity's performance. We were pleased with how easy it was to provide access to our users that were located both within and outside our organization." Park adds, "When working with Client Outlook, we found the open dialogue to be refreshing. Client Outlook's team members were adaptable throughout our evaluation process and their high confidence in eUnity was reflected in their candid approach. We are pleased to have chosen Client Outlook as our partner and eUnity as our image viewing platform." "We are very excited to be implementing eUnity at Connecticut Children's Medical Center. Our focus and dedication on creating the best diagnostic image viewing platform is reflected in all facets of eUnity," said Brenda Rankin, Executive Vice President, Client Outlook. "We have developed a solution that is robust, easy to implement, simple to use, and feature rich. With this implementation, we are making a difference in the lives of children and their families, something that is important to me and our team. Connecticut Children's is a wonderful organization that is improving the physical and emotional health of children, and we are pleased to be part of this journey." Connecticut Children's Medical Center is the only hospital in Connecticut dedicated exclusively to the care of children. Connecticut Children's is a nationally recognized not-for-profit with a medical staff of more than 1,000 providing comprehensive, world-class health care in more than 30 pediatric specialties and subspecialties. Connecticut Children's Medical Center is the primary pediatric teaching hospital for the UConn School of Medicine, has a teaching partnership with the Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine at Quinnipiac University and is a research partner of Jackson Laboratory. Connecticut Children's Office for Community Child Health is a national leader in community-based prevention and wellness programs. http://www.connecticutchildrens.org/ Client Outlook is an innovative healthcare technology company who designs imaging solutions that ultimately save people's lives. Driven by our own personal healthcare experiences, we challenge ourselves every day to develop and deliver the most practical, useful and secure diagnostic, clinical and mobility solution for physicians and frontline healthcare professionals -- right where healthcare happens. For more information about our company and our eUnity™ product suite, visit us on the web at www.clientoutlook.com.


News Article | February 17, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

The University of Connecticut has joined the Advanced Regenerative Manufacturing Institute as a partner for the purpose of sharing its revolutionary human tissue and limb regeneration technologies. The institute, which is headquartered in New Hampshire, aims to speed the growth and use of engineered human tissues and organs to meet the increasing health needs of the nation and its citizens, especially soldiers. "We need to develop 21st-century tools for engineered tissue manufacturing that will allow these innovations to be widely available, similar to how a 15th-century tool - the printing press - allowed knowledge to spread widely during the Renaissance," said the chairman of ARMI, inventor Dean Kamen. ARMI is the 12th Manufacturing USA Institute, a national network of public-private partnerships intended to nurture manufacturing innovation and accelerate commercialization. With public-private investment funding approaching nearly $300 million, ARMI brings together a consortium of nearly 100 partner organizations from across industry, government, academia, and the non-profit sector to develop next-generation manufacturing processes and technologies for cells, tissues, and organs. "We are excited to collaborate with ARMI to lend our expertise to our country and push our regenerative engineering discoveries and breakthroughs closer to the bedsides of soldiers and Americans in need of vital medical care," said Dr. Cato T. Laurencin, an internationally acclaimed surgeon-scientist who is chief executive officer of the Connecticut Institute for Clinical and Translational Science (CICATS) at UConn, and director of the Institute for Regenerative Engineering and The Raymond and Beverly Sackler Center for Biomedical, Biological, Physical, and Engineering Sciences at UConn Health. UConn is currently working toward regenerating a human knee within six years and an entire limb by 2030. Laurencin's brainchild is the HEAL Project - Hartford Engineering A Limb - which was launched in November 2015 and is the first international effort for knee and limb engineering. Laurencin, whose laboratory research successes include the growth of bone and knee ligaments, is known as a pioneer in the field of regenerative engineering and material sciences. At UConn, collaborators making the partnership with ARMI possible include innovative regenerative engineering scientist Lakshmi S. Nair, known for her research advances in growing musculoskeletal tissue at the Institute for Regenerative Engineering at UConn Health. The new ARMI initiative at UConn benefits from strong support by Dr. Bruce T. Liang, dean of the UConn School of Medicine, Kazem Kazerounian, dean of the UConn School of Engineering, and Jeff Seemann, UConn's vice president for research. "In joining ARMI, UConn will contribute to the program's mission to bring together the country's most talented researchers to accelerate the advancement of tissue bioengineering and regeneration discoveries, while helping bring these promising, much needed breakthroughs to patients in their clinical care," said Seemann.


News Article | February 27, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

HARTFORD, Conn., Feb. 27, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The Connecticut Technology Council (CTC) is pleased to announce the 50 women who have been selected as Women of Innovation finalists for the 2017 Women of Innovation awards program. The Women of Innovation® program seeks to celebrate and create a growing network of women in the “trenches” of STEM. Finalists are the scientists, researchers, academics, manufacturers, student leaders, drafters, entrepreneurs, and technicians who create tomorrow’s advancements through their efforts in Connecticut today. The 50 finalists will be recognized at the Women of Innovation® awards gala at the Aqua Turf Club in Plantsville on March 29 from 5 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. A winner in each of the eight award categories will be announced live during the program. The keynote speaker at this year’s ceremony is Adda Birnir, Founder and CEO of Skillcrush, a woman-centric online learning community that helps advance digital skills and creativity, and has been featured on the BBC, Mashable, Fast Company, and Business Insider. Tickets, registration, and details are available online at the CTC website, www.CT.org. The complete list of 2017 Women of Innovation® Finalists is posted below. “For the last twelve years, the Women of Innovation awards ceremony has honored outstanding women who have made significant professional, academic, and community achievements,” said Bruce Carlson, President and CEO of the Connecticut Technology Council. “The 2017 Women of Innovation awards dinner will continue our tradition of celebrating these women and their accomplishments, and marks our expanding program offerings to include and professional growth opportunities to all involved with Women of Innovation, a move aligned with the Connecticut Technology Council’s new strategic initiatives. These initiatives work to fill clear needs in the tech ecosystem here in the state.” The Women of Innovation® program is aligned with CTC’s Talent & Workforce strategic initiative, which is dedicated to bringing a robust tech talent pipeline to Connecticut. Diversity hiring is a significant facet of the Talent & Workforce initiative. Other initiatives include Growth & Innovation, dedicated to serving companies in the growth phase, and the IT & Infrastructure initiative, which focuses on supporting and advocating for the best in tech resources and infrastructure here in Connecticut. Women of Innovation® finalists are nominated by their peers, coworkers, and mentors, and are selected based on their professional experience, history of innovation, ability to think creatively and solve problems, and demonstration of leadership. Students are judged on inventiveness, accomplishment in science and technology, independent research, and academic achievement. This year’s 50 finalists includes researchers, educators, engineers, managers, students and entrepreneurs who work or study biotech, pharmaceuticals, software, computer hardware, advanced materials, medical devices, IT, or associated fields. High school, undergraduate and graduate students who have demonstrated extraordinary and unique achievements in their technology disciplines are also among the finalists. The winner in the Youth Innovation and Leadership category will receive a $4,000 scholarship from Medtronic, one of the program’s presenting sponsors. Women of Innovation® is presented in conjunction with the following companies: Day Pitney LLP, Medtronic Inc, and United Technologies Corporation. The program is supported by Pfizer Inc. and Pitney Bowes Inc., with contributions from Premier Limousine and Marcum LLP. For questions regarding the program or awards dinner please contact Paige Rasid at 860.289.0878 x335. Below is a list of the 2017 Women of Innovation® with their affiliated organizations and town of employment or hometown: Jennifer McFadden, Yale University, Madison Summer McGee, University of New Haven, West Haven Janice Naegele, Wesleyan University, Middletown Michelle Bellinger, Academy of Aerospace & Engineering, West Hartford Nivea Torres, Connecticut Technical High School System (CTHSS), Middletown Jun Chen, University of Connecticut, School of Engineering, Storrs Deborah Dorcemus, University of Connecticut, Danbury Erin Duffy, Yale University, West Haven Wafa Elmannai, University of Bridgeport, Bridgeport Manisha Mishra, University of Connecticut, Storrs Jessica Angier, Hybrid Intelligence, Inc., Shelton                                Jessica Bailey, Greenworks Lending, Darien Wendy Davis, GestVision, Inc., Guilford Marcia Fournier, Bioarray Genetics, Farmington Ellen Matloff, My Gene Counsel, LLC, North Haven Melissa Baran, Sikorsky Aircraft, A Lockheed Martin Company, Stratford Vicki Conant, Sikorsky Aircraft, A Lockheed Martin Company, Stratford Jennifer Graham, Sikorsky Aircraft, A Lockheed Martin Company, Stratford Karen Iannella, Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Ridgefield Jacqueline Jones, PhD., Medtronic, Branford Bhagyashree Khunte, Pfizer, Inc., Groton Jeanne Larsen, UTC Aerospace Systems, Windsor Locks Ping Liu, Sikorsky Aircraft, A Lockheed Martin Company, Stratford Devu Manikantan Shila, Ph.D, United Technologies Research Center, East Hartford Jennifer McLaurin, UTC Aerospace Systems, Windsor Locks Lindsay O'Donnell, Sikorsky Aircraft, A Lockheed Martin Company, Naugatuck Kremena Simitchieva, Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Ridgefield Susan Baserga, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven Jinbo Bi, University of Connecticut, Storrs Alison Gotkin, United Technologies Research Center, East Hartford Nancy Petry, UConn Health, Farmington Danyel Racenet, Medtronic, North Haven Kelly Valentine, Medtronic, North Haven Christine Wetzel, 3M, Meriden Margaret Bailey, Sonalysts, Waterford Jeanine Gouin, Milone & MacBroom, Inc., Cheshire Chun Li, Diameter Health, Farmington Mary Ellen Mateleska, Mystic Aquarium, a division of Sea Research Foundation, Mystic Feliciatas Thurmayr, MD, PhD., Quality Health Ideas, Inc., Suffield Meghan West, CNC Software Inc /Mastercam, Tolland The Connecticut Technology Council is a statewide association of technology oriented companies and institutions, providing leadership in areas of policy advocacy, community building and assistance for growing companies. Speaking for over 2,000 companies that employ some 200,000 residents, the Connecticut Technology Council seeks to provide a strong and urgent voice in support of the creation of a culture of innovation. This includes working to position Connecticut as a leader in idea creation, workforce preparation, entrepreneurial aptitude, early stage risk capital availability and providing on-going support and mentoring to high potential firms. For more information, visit www.ct.org.


News Article | February 25, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

STORRS, Conn. (AP) — Six University of Connecticut students were charged Friday with alcohol-related offenses connected to the death of a student who was run over by a fire department vehicle after leaving a party last fall. The students had been hosting an off-campus party at a fraternity-affiliated house Oct. 16 during homecoming weekend. One of the attendees was Jeffny Pally, a 19-year-old sophomore from West Hartford. Police say Pally had been sitting with her back against a garage door of the UConn Public Safety Complex at around 1 a.m. when she was run over by a fire vehicle responding to a call that turned out to be a false alarm. Two other students have been charged in connection with the false alarm. Pally's body wasn't found until about 30 minutes later when firefighters returned. She died from injuries to her head and torso, the medical examiner's office determined. The driver of the vehicle hasn't been charged, and the death was ruled an accident. The charged students are Patrick Callahan, Matthew Moll, Dylan Morose, Austin Custodio, Dominic Godi and Jonathan Polansky, who range in age from 21 to 22 and are from Connecticut, New York and Massachusetts. Some were charged with permitting a minor to illegally possess alcohol. They were all released pending their arraignment in Superior Court in Rockville on March 8. It couldn't be immediately determined if they had lawyers. A university spokeswoman confirmed the students are still enrolled at UConn but said federal student privacy law prevents the university from saying whether any of them face discipline by the school. The university noted the Kappa Sigma fraternity recently lost its recognition and housing due to off-campus incidents in September and October unrelated to Pally's death. The fraternity's national office also has revoked the local group's charter. "Jeffny Pally was a talented, ambitious, promising young woman and her death was a terrible tragedy," the university said. "The entire university community joins her family and friends in continuing to mourn her loss."


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: co.newswire.com

V. Vanessa Williams, MS, PCC, Founder and CEO of Leading Edge Consulting, LLC, an executive coaching firm with offices in Connecticut and Florida, has received two important national certifications: Minority Owned Business Enterprise (MBE), and Women Owned Business Enterprise (WBE) designations. “We understand the critical importance of fostering strong vendor resources, including MBE and WBE, that are nationally certified as we are,” said Williams.  “Diversity certification is an important milestone for Leading Edge Consulting because it authenticates that the business is owned, managed and controlled by a qualifying diverse group.  We are thrilled to share the news with our clients, partners and the market as we expand and continue to offer leadership solutions.” Organizations such as the National Minority Supplier Diversity Council (NMSDC) and the Women’s Business Enterprise National Council (WBENC) focus on assuring that businesses are appropriately categorized by offering third-party certification services on behalf of private industry. Supplier diversity is beneficial to all stakeholders, not just to companies with Supplier Diversity programs. Corporations, organizations and government agencies demonstrate their commitment to fostering diversity and continued development of their supplier/vendor diversity programs by including women-owned and minority-owned businesses among their vendors. The National Minority Supplier Development Council, Inc. (NMSDC), is one of the country’s leading corporate membership organizations. NMSDC is committed to helping corporate and public-sector supply chains solve the growing need for supplier diversity. NMSDC is a resource to qualifying firms of all sizes - whether a small minority-owned organization or a billion-dollar powerhouse. The NMSDC network includes a national office in New York City, 23 affiliate regional councils nationwide and over 1,750 corporate members and growing. The Greater New England Minority Supplier Development Council (GNEMSDC) is an affiliate of the NMSDC and represents six New England States, which are Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Vermont.  For more information about NMSDC, visit www.nmsdc.org. The Women’s Business Enterprise National Council is the nation’s largest third-party certifier of businesses owned, controlled and operated by women in the United States. WBENC, partners with fourteen Regional Partner Organizations (RPO’s) to provide its world class standard of certification throughout the country. WBENC is a resource for the more than 700 U.S. companies and government agencies that rely on WBENC’s certification as an integral part of their supplier diversity programs. The Center for Women & Enterprise represents is one of those RPO’s and represents Northern Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Vermont.  For more information about WBENC, visit www.wbenc.org. Leading Edge Consulting, LLC is an Executive Coaching practice offering Executive and CEO Succession Coaching, Culture and Business Change Management Strategy, Organizational Assessment and Development Coaching, Organizational Inclusion and Diversity Consulting, and Talent Acquisition – Analysis, Execution, and On-boarding.  Leading Edge Consulting works with a range of clients: executives (c-suites), managers, business owners/entrepreneur’s, and organizations as a whole.  This matches a growing trend in the Corporate World of leaders and organizations seeking guidance, expertise and real world experience as they focus on greater collaboration, diversity and inclusion, and other strategies to improve leadership effectiveness. Founder, Vanessa Williams is a member of the International Coaching Federation (ICF) and is a Professional Certified Coach (PCC).  For more information visit www.leadingedgeconsultingllc.com or contact Vanessa Williams at vanessawilliams@leadingedgeconsultingllc.com. V Vanessa Williams, MS, PCC is the Founder and CEO of Leading Edge Consulting, LLC, a global executive coaching firm with offices in CT and FL. Vanessa has an International background and vast experience in Executive Coaching, Women & Diversity Leadership Coaching, Leadership Advancement, Operations Leadership, Business Process Outsourcing (BPO), Strategic Business Planning, Management & Financial Reporting, and Change Management. Vanessa uses a holistic approach with her clients from identifying success roadblocks and creating metric driven action plans and goal setting. She also works with executives, business owners and c-suites to identify strategic goals and to build and engage high-performing collaborative teams. In her corporate career, Vanessa was a Managing Director for Horton International, a retained global boutique executive search firm headquartered in West Hartford, CT.  She also held senior level and C-suite positions leading high-powered executive global teams for Sun Life Financial, Prudential, MassMutual, Aetna, and UConn Health. Vanessa holds an Executive Master of Science Degree in Management from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, a Bachelor of Science Degree in Accounting from Virginia State University, and is a Professional Certified Coach (PCC) with the International Coaching Federation. She sits on the Board of Trustees for Easter Seals, The New England Air Museum, and Amistad Center for Arts & Culture. She also sits on the Advisory Board for Reginald F. Lewis College Business Alumni at Virginia State University.


News Article | March 1, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The V Foundation for Cancer Research, a top-rated cancer research charity, announces fundraising initiatives beginning this month. Coinciding with college basketball’s championship season, ESPN, Constellation Brands Beer Division, Constellation Wines and Apple Gold Group will celebrate the late Jim Valvano’s “Don’t Give Up . . . Don’t Ever Give Up!”® spirit by offering numerous ways for supporters dedicated to declaring victory over cancer to get involved. Contributions from these partnerships will strategically fund emerging, high-impact research opportunities to make the greatest advances in the shortest amount of time as part of the V Foundation’s Not a Moment to Lose $200 million capital campaign. “The V Foundation is more passionate than ever about the course set by Jim and ESPN 24 years ago,” said Susan Braun, CEO of the V Foundation. “We are driven to put an end to cancer through cutting-edge research.” As one of 14 icons to be honored in this year’s class of Atlantic Coast Conference Basketball Legends, Valvano continues to inspire nearly 25 years after his iconic ESPY Awards speech when the V Foundation for Cancer Research was first announced. Valvano’s legacy has affected, and will continue to affect, millions of people around the world as the V Foundation transforms the prevention, detection and treatment of cancer by accelerating the pace of scientific progress. Remembering Valvano through philanthropy, the V Foundation has an all-star group of partners eager to support its cause this spring. This year, the V Foundation will be featured within ESPN’s Tournament Challenge mobile application and web game during the 2017 NCAA Division I Men’s Basketball Tournament. When fans log in to fill out their brackets and throughout the tournament, they will have the ability to donate to the V Foundation and enter for a chance to win an all-expense paid trip to the 2017 Jimmy V Classic at Madison Square Garden in New York, which will pit UConn against Syracuse and Gonzaga against Villanova in a blueblood doubleheader on December 5. The prize package includes two tickets, airfare, accommodations, a signed basketball from all four coaches and a $400 gift card. To enter the sweepstakes, please visit http://www.v.org/win. No donation is necessary to win. Constellation Brands Beer Division’s promotion, “You Love the Game … Now Join the Fight,” marks the seventh year of fundraising for the V Foundation. From March 1 to April 3, Constellation Brands Beer Division will make a donation to the V Foundation for each purchased case of Corona Extra or Corona Light. Last year’s efforts raised more than $1.26 million for cancer research. The wine division of Constellation, Constellation Wines, will also include signage promoting its support of the V Foundation on its top-selling Woodbridge wines throughout March. Last year, Constellation Wines donated $40,000 to fund cutting-edge research. Additionally, from March 7 to April 3, guests at 52 Apple Gold Group-owned Applebee’s restaurants across North Carolina will be invited to participate in the 11th annual March Hoops Fundraiser. For each $1 donation, fans will receive a paper basketball to decorate in spirit of their favorite team participating in the national championship. Since 2006, Apple Gold Group has raised more than $1.3 million for the V Foundation through the March Hoops Fundraiser and other initiatives. The V Foundation recently announced its Not a Moment to Lose fundraising campaign with a goal to raise $200 million by 2020 and further the momentum behind today’s extraordinary research. Through its partners, like ESPN, Constellation Brands, Apple Gold Group and many others, as well as its generous donors that help bring Valvano’s mission to life, the V Foundation has already raised nearly $120 million towards that goal. For more information about the V Foundation for Cancer Research and how to get involved, please visit http://www.jimmyv.org. About the V Foundation for Cancer Research: The V Foundation for Cancer Research is dedicated to declaring victory over cancer. It was founded in 1993 by ESPN and the late Jim Valvano, legendary North Carolina State Basketball coach and ESPN commentator. Since 1993, the Foundation has funded more than $170 million in cancer research grants nationwide. It awards 100 percent of all direct cash donations to cancer research and related programs. Due to generous donors, the Foundation has an endowment that covers administrative expenses. Not a Moment to Lose, its boldest fundraising campaign to date, aims to raise $200 million for cancer research by 2020 to help transform the prevention, detection and treatment of cancer. The Foundation awards peer-reviewed grants through a competitive awards process vetted by a world-renowned Scientific Advisory Committee. For more information on the V Foundation, please visit http://www.jimmyv.org.


News Article | February 27, 2017
Site: www.labdesignnews.com

The department of Physics will remain in Gant, and much of the Biological Life Sciences will consolidate from multiple locations to new state-of-the-art classrooms, teaching and research laboratories, lecture halls, faculty offices, support spaces and student amenities. Following a rigorous selection process, the university engaged a joint venture team: Goody Clancy of Boston partnered with Mitchell Giurgola of New York. In their interview, the team demonstrated enthusiasm for tackling the big issues: • A very large complicated project • Phased construction • Building occupancy during construction • Energy and infrastructure upgrades • Making science “visible” First, the team set out to understand the challenges of the building—with the goal of turning them into opportunities. As they began their work, they asked difficult questions. How do you best serve the students, faculty, staff and visitors of the university? How do you breathe new life into an antiquated building? How do you gain functional space in an existing building when you can’t expand the footprint? What’s the most appropriate use of State University dollars? “Invest in programmatic and functional goals first,” stated Laura Cruickshank, FAIA (UConn’s Master Planner and Chief Architect). “As a state institution, we are not immune to budget deficits and fiscal cuts.” Regarding limited available floor area, Jim Braddock of Mitchell Giurgola stated, “It was necessary to build consensus on space needs and configuration both within and among departments. This was accomplished through consideration of numerous alternatives in many meetings with representatives of the departments, the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (CLAS), Facilities, University Planning, Design and Construction (UPDC) and the design team.” So what defines this place? The Gant complex is massive, rigid and orthogonal. Wayfinding is confusing; the existing spaces are not comfortable for users and visitors. The exterior envelope is compromised. The building has exceeded its useful life. How can such a facility be reimagined? Successful adaptive reuse projects are transformative, building on a strong foundation and structure—literally as well as figuratively. Reinvention must go back to basics. The key goal is to turn the unfortunate into the excellent. UConn and its design team began to ask more specific questions: • What does the facility lack? • What level of science can the building support? • How can the building be made more functional and efficient? • What are the priorities for redevelopment? • How can wayfinding be improved? • How can the renovated facility be more inviting—a focal point for student involvement? • How can a limited budget be applied for maximum effect? • How can redevelopment support the master plan and academic vision goals? Development of design ideas showcase the collective spirit of the university’s STEM initiatives physically, functionally and spiritually. Continuous dialoguebetween conceptual ideas, contextual constraints and budget considerations shaped the ultimate design concept. Central themes began to emerge.


News Article | February 19, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

A new model released today at the meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science by UConn ecologist Jamie Vaudrey pinpoints sources of nitrogen pollution along Long Island Sound, and shows municipalities what they might do to alleviate it. Long Island Sound is an estuary of the Atlantic Ocean bordered by Connecticut to the north, New York City to the west, and Long Island to the south. The Sound is home to dozens of species of birds, 170 species of fish, and more than 1,200 species of invertebrates. Historically it has supported rich recreational and commercial fisheries for lobster, oysters, blue crabs, scallops, striped bass, flounder, and bluefish. In recent decades however, those fisheries have suffered from excess nitrogen in the water. The extra nitrogen feeds seaweed and algae blooms that use up oxygen, killing fish, and changing the ecology in ways that make it less suited to shellfish. This is called eutrophication. But the nitrogen pollution - and subsequent fish kills and habitat degradation - isn't distributed evenly throughout Long Island Sound. There are 116 rivers, estuaries, harbors, and bays along Long Island Sound, and the amount of nitrogen runoff varies enormously from one to another. Major sources of nitrogen include septic tanks and sewers, fertilizer from lawns and parks, agricultural practices, and atmospheric deposition from dust, rain, and snow. There are lots of actions that citizens and towns can take to minimize the runoff. But they can only reduce it if they know it's there in the first place. There was very little data on nitrogen runoff from individual communities in Long Island Sound when Vaudrey and her colleagues first set out to look at the problem. They spent four years collecting data on where the nitrogen comes from in each of the 116 estuaries, rivers, and harbors, because while people may only care a little about Long Island Sound in the abstract, they care a lot about their own specific place. The beach where they swim, the pier they fish from, the coast they sail along, these are what people care about. So the researchers constructed a detailed model that anyone can download to look at their specific river, harbor, or bay. "[The model] is a tool for citizens and managers to explore the impact of different actions," says Vaudrey, an assistant research professor in marine sciences. The model is in the form of an Excel spreadsheet. There's a page titled 'scenarios,' where you can choose a specific community and alter the settings to see, for example, how changing the fertilizer applications in local parks will affect nitrogen runoff. There's also a page called 'interesting results' that shows the 27 places with the highest load of nitrogen per water area. The Pequonnock River in Bridgeport, Conn. has the highest load, followed by rivers in Greenwich, Conn., Mamaroneck, N.Y., and Fairfield, Conn. But other harbors and rivers located near the worst offenders have dramatically lower nitrogen loads, showing that population density isn't destiny, and that land use decisions, proper sewage treatment, and citizen education can make a difference. The model has already been used by the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (CT-DEEP) to identify eight Connecticut estuaries that need further study and nitrogen reduction plans, and the department intends to use it in an upcoming evaluation of septic systems, according to Kelly Streich at CT-DEEP's Long Island Sound Study. The Nature Conservancy has also worked with the model. "Although great progress has been made cleaning up Long Island Sound in the last two decades, Vaudrey's tool points to places where more work is needed to restore and protect healthy conditions. With this information, decision-makers can identify the most significant sources of nitrogen pollution and use proven solutions - such as upgrading and modernizing septic systems or reducing fertilizer use - to sustain clean water," says Holly Drinkuth, director of outreach and watershed projects at The Nature Conservancy in Connecticut. Vaudrey hopes to work with organizations adept at outreach, such as The Nature Conservancy, Save the Sound, and the Long Island Sound Study, to better inform management decisions at the local level. She is also starting work on a second model, one that looks at what happens in the coastal waters once nitrogen is introduced. Each bay and harbor is unique; how a bay responds to the nitrogen load depends upon how much freshwater flows in from rivers or streams, as well as the size and depth of the bay, and the height of the tides. The end goal is a model that predicts the nitrogen load needed to get the water quality the community wants in each bay. The model can be found at: http://vaudrey.

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