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News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The University of Bridgeport (UB) is pleased to announce that it has experienced considerable success in the inaugural year of its Connecticut Promise. The program, which allows in-state students to attend the private university as freshman for the price of a public education, has already helped over 200 students from Connecticut receive a valuable education at UB at a reasonable cost. The Connecticut Promise was introduced to incoming Fall 2016 students in an effort to help alleviate the growing national issue of student debt. The program was first introduced last year to help students handle the increasing burden of paying for higher education. With an extensive curriculum heavily focused on career-oriented learning and experiences, UB aspired to make its education as affordable—or even more affordable—as leading in-state public colleges. To do this, UB pledged that any incoming, in-state freshman would pay no more than $18,500 for tuition, fees, and room and board. This means that once all scholarships and grants have been applied, UB will make up the difference to ensure that no qualifying student owes more than $18,500. And, under the program, in-state commuting freshman pay no more than $12,000. UB’s Connecticut Promise flawlessly aligns with its long-standing commitment to its students. As announced this past November by Student Loan Report, UB’s student loan debt was the fourth lowest in Connecticut and within the top 150 schools nationwide. “Our priority has always been—and always will be—our students,” said Neil Albert Salonen, University of Bridgeport President. “By initiating programs like the Connecticut Promise to decrease the cost of a quality education and combat the widespread issue of student debt, we feel confident that we can continue to open our doors to even more students across all walks of life. At this time, we are proud to be a place of learning for students from 46 states and more than 80 countries worldwide.” The Connecticut Promise makes UB the only private institution in the state to provide this kind of cost cap. In addition to the Connecticut Promise, UB currently provides financial aid to 96 percent of its first-time students, with $20 million in assistance provided to university students last year. To learn more about the University of Bridgeport and its Connecticut Promise, visit http://www.bridgeport.edu/ctpromise/. The University of Bridgeport offers career-oriented undergraduate, graduate and professional degrees and award-winning academic programs in a culturally diverse learning environment that prepares graduates for leadership in an increasingly interconnected world. There are 400 full- and part-time faculty members, including Fulbright Scholars, National Science Foundation Fellows, Ford Fellows, National Endowment for the Humanities Fellows, American Council for Learned Societies Scholars, and Phi Beta Kappa Scholars. The University is independent and non-sectarian. For more information, please visit http://www.bridgeport.edu.


News Article | February 27, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

UB research could lead to treatments for pregnant mothers at risk for bearing children with the disease BUFFALO, N.Y. -- The skin cells of four adults with schizophrenia have provided an unprecedented "window" into how the disease began while they were still in the womb, according to a recent paper in Schizophrenia Research. The paper was published online in January by researchers at the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at the University at Buffalo in collaboration with the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. It provides what the authors call the first proof of concept for their hypothesis that a common genomic pathway lies at the root of schizophrenia. The researchers say the work is a first step toward the design of treatments that could be administered to pregnant mothers at high risk for bearing a child with schizophrenia, potentially preventing the disease before it begins. "In the last 10 years, genetic investigations into schizophrenia have been plagued by an ever-increasing number of mutations found in patients with the disease," said Michal K. Stachowiak, PhD, senior author on the paper, and professor in the Department of Pathology and Anatomical Sciences in the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at UB. "We show for the first time that there is, indeed, a common, dysregulated gene pathway at work here," he said. The authors gained insight into the early brain pathology of schizophrenia by using skin cells from four adults with schizophrenia and four adults without the disease that were reprogrammed back into induced pluripotent stem cells and then into neuronal progenitor cells. "By studying induced pluripotent stem cells developed from different patients, we recreated the process that takes place during early brain development in utero, thus obtaining an unprecedented view of how this disease develops," said Stachowiak. "This work gives us an unprecedented insight into those processes." The research provides what he calls proof of concept for the hypothesis he and his colleagues published in 2013. They proposed that a single genomic pathway, called the Integrative Nuclear FGFR 1 Signaling (INFS), is a central intersection point for multiple pathways involving more than 100 genes believed to be involved in schizophrenia. "This research shows that there is a common dysregulated gene program that may be impacting more than 1,000 genes and that the great majority of those genes are targeted by the dysregulated nuclear FGFR1," Stachowiak said. When even one of the many schizophrenia-linked genes undergoes mutation, by affecting the INFS it throws off the development of the brain as a whole, similar to the way that an entire orchestra can be affected by a musician playing just one wrong note, he said. The next step in the research is to use these induced pluripotent stem cells to further study how the genome becomes dysregulated, allowing the disease to develop. "We will utilize this strategy to grow cerebral organoids - mini-brains in a sense - to determine how this genomic dysregulation affects early brain development and to test potential preventive or corrective treatments," he said. UB co-authors with Stachowiak are P. Sarder and E. K. Stachowiak, both assistant professors in the Department of Pathology and Anatomical Sciences, as well as S. Narla, Y-W Lee and C.A. Benson, all graduate students in the department. K.J. Brennand of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai also is a co-author. The work is funded by NYSTEM, the Patrick P. Lee Foundation, the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health. Founded in 1846, the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at the University at Buffalo is beginning a new chapter in its history with the largest medical education building under construction in the nation. The eight-story, 628,000-square-foot facility is scheduled to open in 2017. The new location puts superior medical education, clinical care and pioneering research in close proximity, anchoring Buffalo's evolving comprehensive academic health center in a vibrant downtown setting. These new facilities will better enable the school to advance health and wellness across the life span for the people of New York and the world through research, clinical care and the education of tomorrow's leaders in health care and biomedical sciences. The school's faculty and residents provide care for the community's diverse populations through strong clinical partnerships and the school's practice plan, UBMD Physicians' Group.


News Article | February 17, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

BUFFALO, N.Y. -- While diversity training programs are a good way to build awareness of cultural differences, they usually are not as effective at changing attitudes and behaviors toward diverse groups in the workplace, according to new research from the University at Buffalo School of Management. Published in Psychological Bulletin, the study found diversity training can be successful -- but that results vary widely based on the content and length of training and whether it was accompanied by other related initiatives. "In today's political climate, diversity training has the potential to make a huge positive impact in addressing biases and prejudice within organizations," says Kate Bezrukova, PhD, associate professor of organization and human resources in the UB School of Management. "But training must be conducted thoughtfully. At best, it can engage and retain women and people of color in the workplace, but at worst, it can backfire and reinforce stereotypes." Diversity training aims to enhance participants' cultural awareness, skills and motivation to interact with individuals of different ethnicities, genders, orientations, ages and more. Bezrukova and her team examined more than 40 years of research, combining data from 260 studies and more than 29,000 participants across a variety of fields. They found diversity training had immediate positive effects on participants' knowledge, attitudes and behaviors related to diverse groups. Over time, however, their attitude and behavioral changes decayed or reverted, while their cultural knowledge remained consistent or even increased. "The attitudes this training attempts to change are generally strong, emotion-driven and tied to our personal identities, and we found little evidence that long-term effects to them are sustainable," Bezrukova says. "However, when people are reminded of scenarios covered in training by their colleagues or even the media, they are able to retain or expand on the information they learned." The study found training is most effective when it is mandatory, delivered over an extended period of time, integrated with other initiatives and designed to increase both awareness and skills. In addition, participants responded more favorably to programs that used several methods of instruction, including lectures, discussions and exercises. "It's critical to offer diversity programs as part of a series of related efforts, such as mentoring or networking groups for minority professionals," Bezrukova says. "When organizations demonstrate a commitment to diversity, employees are more motivated to learn about and understand these societal issues and apply that in their daily interactions." Bezrukova's co-authors on the study are Karen Jehn, PhD, professor of management, University of Melbourne Business School; Jamie Perry, PhD, assistant professor, Cornell University School of Hotel Administration; and Chester Spell, PhD, professor of management, Rutgers University School of Business-Camden. The UB School of Management is recognized for its emphasis on real-world learning, community and economic impact, and the global perspective of its faculty, students and alumni. The school also has been ranked by Bloomberg Businessweek, Forbes and U.S. News & World Report for the quality of its programs and the return on investment it provides its graduates. For more information about the UB School of Management, visit mgt.buffalo.edu.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Researchers are creating software to 'clean' large datasets, making it easier for scientists and the public to use big data BUFFALO, N.Y. -- Like a teenager's bedroom, big data is often messy. Malfunctioning computers, data entry errors and other hard-to-spot problems can skew datasets and mislead people -- everyone from data scientists to data hobbyists -- trying to draw conclusions from raw data. Vizier, a software tool under development by a University at Buffalo-led research team, aims to proactively catch those errors. The project, backed by a $2.7 million National Science Foundation grant, launched in January. Like Excel and other spreadsheet software, Vizier will allow users to interactively work with datasets. For example, it will help people explore, clean, curate and visualize data in meaningful ways, as well as spot errors and offer solutions. But unlike spreadsheet software, Vizier is intended for much larger datasets; it will be used to examine millions or billions of data points, as opposed to hundreds or thousands typically plugged into spreadsheet software. "We are creating a tool that'll let you work with the data you have, and also unobtrusively make helpful observations like 'Hmm... have you noticed that two out of a million records make a 10 percent difference in this average?'" says Oliver Kennedy, PhD, assistant professor of computer science and engineering at UB, and the grant's principal investigator. Co-principal investigators include Juliana Freire, professor of computer science and engineering at New York University, and Boris Glavic, assistant professor in the Department of Computer Science at the Illinois Institute of Technology. The award is from NSF's Data Infrastructure Building Blocks (DIBBs) program. For years, companies like Google, Microsoft and Apple have utilized big data to improve their products and services. That same power is now spreading to the masses as government agencies in the United States and elsewhere publish massive amounts of public data on the internet. For example, New York City and the federal government have open data portals making it possible for anyone with an internet connection to download information and ask questions about their government. When properly used, these portals can shed light on issues relating to health code violations, discrimination, bias and other matters, Kennedy said. Vizier will be released as free, open-source software. "We want to make it easier for data scientists -- and eventually data hobbyists -- to discover and communicate not only what the data says, but why the data says that," he said.


Suomen Hoivatilat Oyj has submitted its application to be listed on the official list Suomen Hoivatilat Oyj ("Hoivatilat" or the "Company") has today submitted its listing application to Nasdaq Helsinki Ltd (the "Helsinki Stock Exchange") to admit the Company's shares to trading on the official list of the Helsinki Stock Exchange. The listing of Hoivatilat's shares is conditional on the Helsinki Stock Exchange approving the Company's listing application. Trading in the Company's shares on the official list is expected to start on or about 1 March 2017. At the same time, Hoivatilat has requested its shares to be removed from the First North Finland market maintained by Nasdaq Helsinki Ltd. The trading code of Hoivatilat shares (HOIVA) and the ISIN code (FI4000148648) will remain unchanged. Starting from this day, Hoivatilat complies with the regulations on the disclosure obligations of listed companies. Further information about the listing is available in the listing prospectus consisting of a registration document and a securities note and summary published by the Company on 24 February 2017. The listing prospectus is available in Finnish on the Hoivatilat website at www.hoivatilat.fi/listautuminen2017, and at the Hoivatilat head office in Oulu (Lentokatu 2, Pilot Business Park, 90460 Oulunsalo) and, as of approximately 28 February 2017, at the Helsinki Stock Exchange (Fabianinkatu 14, 00100 Helsinki). Krogerus Attorneys Ltd acts as the legal advisor of Hoivatilat in connection with the listing process, and Skandinaviska Enskilda Banken AB (publ) Helsinki Branch acts as the Company's financial advisor. UB Securities Ltd acts as the Company's certified advisor approved in accordance with the rules of First North until the listing on the official list. Suomen Hoivatilat Oyj specialises in producing, developing, owning and leasing out nursing homes, day care centres and service blocks. Hoivatilat was founded in 2008, and the company has been working in cooperation with as many as 50 Finnish municipalities and launched 100 property projects around Finland. The company was listed on the Nasdaq First North Finland market in 2016 and it has over 4,400 shareholders.


News Article | March 1, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

BUFFALO, N.Y. - For singers and their audiences, being "in tune" might not be as important as we think. The fact that singers fail to consistently hit the right notes may have implications for the development of musical scales as well. At issue is not whether singers hit the right or wrong note, but how close are they to any note. It's what researchers call microtuning, according to Peter Pfordresher, a UB psychologist and the paper's lead author of a new paper with Steven Brown of McMaster University published in the Journal of Cognitive Psychology. The findings not only suggest a different approach to the aesthetics of singing but could have a role in understanding the evolutionary development of the scales, as well as applications to childhood singing development and speech production for tone languages. There is a long-standing belief that musical scales arose from simple harmonic ratios. The Greek mathematician Pythagoras found that plucking a string at certain points produced pleasing steps similar to the progression heard in musical scales - Do-Re-Mi-Fa-So-La-Ti-Do. Scales came about as a way of getting as close as possible to Pythagoras' pure tuning. Or maybe not. Pfordresher says there are at least three problems with trying to match Pythagoras' pure tuning. First, scales are not purely tuned, which has been known for a long time. It's also not clear to what extent all of the world's musical scales tie into the kinds of principles Pythagoras pioneered. Pfordresher cites Indonesian musical scales as an example that does not align itself with Pythagorean pure tones. The third problems rests with Pythagoras basing his theory on instruments, first strings and later pipes. "This is where Steve and I came up with our evolutionary idea," says Pfordresher. "Probably the best starting point to think about what we call music is to look at singing, not instruments." The researchers studied three groups of singers of varying abilities: professionals, untrained singers who tend sing in tune and the untrained who tend not to sing in tune. They weren't listening for whether the singers were hitting the right notes, but rather how close they were to any note. Pfordresher and Brown found that the groups did not differ in terms of microtuning, although they were very different aesthetically. "Our proposal is, maybe scales were designed as a way to accommodate how out of tune, how variable singers are," says Pfordresher. "We suggest that the starting point for scales and tuning for scales was probably not the tuning of musical instruments, but the mistuning of the human voice." To set up a kind of musical grammar requires rules that allow for songs to be understood, remembered and reproduced. To accomplish these goals, that system needs pitches spaced widely enough to accommodate inconsistencies from person to person. The space between Do and Re, for instance, is heard by playing two adjacent white keys on a piano keyboard and provides that kind of liberal spacing. "When you look around the world, you find there are a couple of properties for scales," says Pfordresher. "There's a tendency to have notes that are spaced somewhat broadly, much more broadly than the fine gradations in pitch that our ears can pick up." This broad spacing helps all kinds of singers, including the nightingale wren, a bird whose virtuosity has been the province of poets since antiquity. Pfordresher says earlier research by Marcelo Araya-Salas found that flexibly tuned instruments like violins and trombones were more in tune that the wren's song. And though not part of the published study, Pfordresher also analyzed an excerpt of a studio version of Frank Sinatra singing "The Best is Yet to Come." "It's a wonderful recording and a challenging song to sing, but when acoustically analyzed using several measurements, the pitches are not purely tuned," says Pfordresher. "Although he's close enough for our ears."


News Article | February 27, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

BUFFALO, N.Y. -- Thousands of ants converge to follow the most direct path from their colony to their food and back. A swarm of inexpensive, unmanned drones quickly map an offshore oil spill. What could these events have in common? Each extremely complex task is accomplished by individuals following very simple rules. But to make the drones do it, a bit of nature's magic must be captured in a mathematical formula. "Nature may not proactively use mathematics, nor does it have foresight. It behaves in ways driven by feedback, implicit drive for adaptation, and a certain degree of apparent randomness," said Souma Chowdhury, PhD, assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering in the University at Buffalo's School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. "But we can look at what kind of mathematical principles define that behavior. Once we have that, we can use it to solve very complex problems." Chowdhury is pioneering a way to program a team of drones to quickly map an oil spill. His computational efforts, in a paper which he co-authored with UB students Zachary Ball and Philip Odonkor, were presented in January at the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics' Science and Technology Forum. The study, called "A Swarm-Intelligence Approach to Oil Spill Mapping using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles," optimized and simulated a five-drone swarm that can map a nearly one-kilometer wide spill in nine minutes. To make that work, Chowdhury had to overcome the lack of communication bandwidth typical of a flying ad hoc network and the short battery life of off-the-shelf drones. Following the principles partly inspired by the dynamics of a flock of birds, Chowdhury devised a method for the drones to quickly record whether they are over water, oil or the edge of the spill. In addition, the drones assume that the space around the oil they have spotted is also oil, although that is recorded as less than certain. This simple information is shared with the other drones in the swarm, as opposed to sharing actual images or video, which would require too much bandwidth. "Communication is the foundation of any swarm," he said. As the drones move from point to point over the spill, they avoid going over space that other drones have already covered. Thus, with five drones making observations every five seconds, the size of the spill can be determined quickly. The drones also fly to their base, on a boat, when their batteries get low. The drones that replace them on the search already have the information from all the other drones, so they avoid previously mapped locations. "The thematic focus of my lab is developing computational design approaches that take inspiration from nature," Chowdhury said. The low computer power -- each drone can operate with a $35 Raspberry Pi computer -- keeps costs low. Chowdhury's approach accomplishes a complex task using simple agents. "There is no need for human interaction during its entire mission," he said. "That's the big deal." Another big deal is the cost. Chowdhury's approach assumes simple, affordable drones, which makes it accessible to many more people. "This task can be accomplished by off-the-shelf drones that cost under $1,000. All they need is to have a simple drone-mountable camera system and use our software," he said. Collision avoidance is another challenge for the swarm, and here too, Chowdhury is following nature's simple rules. In recent work reported by the University of Queensland, researchers watched very carefully how parrots never crashed into each other. They observed through tunnel experiments that they always veer to the right, a simple rule that keeps every member of the flock safe. Chowdhury's lab is exploring how using similar principles, drones can pre-emptively turn a certain angle to the right when they sense another flying member of the swarm. He is writing that in a companion paper to be submitted to another international conference later this year. Swarming drones could be used elsewhere, such as mapping forest fires or other natural disasters. It's possible they could be used to help locate people trapped after an earthquake by changing the type of cameras used.


BUFFALO, N.Y. - Power imbalances in heterosexual relationships are common, but having less power takes a greater toll on young women than young men, according to a recently published University at Buffalo study. The results, appearing in The Journal of Sex Research, suggest "a healthy skepticism when it comes to what looks like gender equality," says Laina Bay-Cheng, an associate professor in the UB School of Social Work and an expert in young women's sexuality. "This research refutes the claim that gender equality has been reached and we don't have to worry about misogyny anymore." Bay-Cheng says the dynamics underneath relationships require scrutiny and the often-heard claim that girls and women have reached and in some ways surpassed equality with men unravels quickly when examined in detail. "We have to look closely at relationships and experiences and stop taking surface indicators as proof of gender equality," says Bay-Cheng. "When men are subordinate in a relationship, it doesn't bother them very much. They don't see those relationships as less intimate or stable than relationships in which they are dominant. But for young women, having less power in a relationship is associated with diminished intimacy and stability and comes with greater risk of abuse. "Inequality within a relationship doesn't cost men as much because they are still cushioned by a broader system of male privilege." Relationships that develop during emerging adulthood are foundational events. It's from these early experiences that people learn how to be in a relationship and depending on the nature and quality of the experiences, the effects - both positive and negative - can echo throughout life. "It's so important that we understand that it's not that sex and relationships are at the root of risk or vulnerability. Instead, some young women, because of intersecting forms of oppression - especially misogyny, racism and economic injustice - enter relationships and are already at a disadvantage," says Bay-Cheng. "For young women, relationships are where all different forms of vulnerability and injustice converge." Bay-Cheng developed a novel research method for this study that considered both the objectives of researchers and participants' experience, which, she says, is as important as the findings. For this study, Bay-Cheng used a digital, online calendar that participants fill out using all of their sexual experiences from their adolescence and early adulthood. The open-ended digital calendar can be filled out over a month and participants can enter anything they want, not just text, but audio files, images or even emoji. The result is a more meaningful measure for researchers and participants. "On the research side we get varied and diverse data," says Bay-Cheng. "For participants, rather than circling a number on a scale on some survey, they get to express themselves how they want, at their own pace, and then look at their calendars and get different perspective on their sexual histories and how these relate to other parts of their lives. Participants have told us how meaningful that chance to reflect can be. It's important for researchers to care as much about the quality of participants' experiences in our studies as the quality of our data."


Strukturoitujen sijoituslainojen myynti laski edellisvuodesta yleisen markkinakehityksen saattelemana. Erittäin matalien korkojen ympäristö on vaikeuttanut strukturoitujen tuotteiden myyntiä kaikilla alan toimijoilla. Alhainen korkotaso on johtanut siihen, että useimpien tuotetyyppien osalta sijoitusten tuottopotentiaali on jäänyt selvästi aiempaa heikommaksi. Suomen Strukturoitujen Sijoitustuotteiden yhdistys ry:n tilastojen mukaan kokonaismarkkina supistui yli 30 prosenttia noin 1,3 miljardiin euroon. UB Omaisuudenhoidon strukturoitujen sijoituslainojen myynti laski noin 91 miljoonaan euroon (115 miljoonaa euroa vuonna 2015). Yhtiön markkinaosuus tuotteiden myynnistä kasvoi kuitenkin 7,0 prosenttiin edellisvuoden 6,0 prosentista. Yhtiön kokoon nähden UB Omaisuudenhoito onkin merkittävä toimija strukturoitujen tuotteiden markkinoilla, mikä kertoo yhtiön hyvästä maineesta laadukkaiden tuotteiden tarjoajana. United Bankers -konserni panosti edelleen voimakkaasti sekä sisäisiin tietojärjestelmiinsä että verkkopalveluihinsa. Yhtiö on kehittänyt muun muassa verkkopalvelu OmaUB:ta, joka on mahdollistanut sijoittajille vaivattoman asiakkuuden avaamisen, verkossa asioinnin ja sijoitusten seuraamisen ympäri vuorokauden. Kehitysinvestoinnit ovat myös tehostaneet yhtiön hallinnollisia prosesseja ja poistaneet manuaalisia työvaiheita merkittävästi. Digitalisaatiotrendiin vastaaminen on fokuksessa myös United Bankersin strategiassa. Tavoitteena on ollut luoda valmius sijoituspalvelutuotteiden tarjoamiselle entistä laajemmille asiakassegmenteille. Työ alkaa myös kantaa hedelmää: vuonna 2016 verkkopalvelun kautta rekisteröityneiden asiakkaiden määrä kasvoi noin 130 % edellisvuodesta ja merkintöjen lukumäärä noin 250 %. Harva yhtiö Suomen finanssimarkkinoilla on saavuttanut 30 vuoden iän itsenäisenä säilyen. Taidamme olla maan vanhin sijoituspalvelukonserni, joka ei ole pankki. Aloittaessani UB:lla 17 vuotta sitten meitä oli noin parikymmentä. Heistä suurin osa on edelleen mukana rakentamassa yhtiötä - perustajat mukaan lukien. Nyt UB-laisia on jo yli sata, mutta meillä on edelleen sama tekemisen meininki. Yhtiön pitkän iän salaisuus on asiakaskokemukseen ja sen kehittämiseen intohimoisesti suhtautuva henkilökunta. Pyrimme myös siihen, että toimintamme on mahdollisimman ketterää ja pelaamme aina joukkueena. UB:n tehtävänä on toimia suunnannäyttäjänä vaurastumisessa. Haluamme kasvattaa määrätietoisesti liiketoimintaamme nykyistä merkittävästi suuremmaksi pohjoismaiseksi finanssitaloksi. Kasvu ei ole vaihtoehto vaan elinehto, eikä kansainvälistymistä tule pelätä. Meillä on huippuluokan finanssialan osaamista Suomessa, ja sille löytyy kysyntää myös maailmalta. Me UB:lla haluamme omalta osaltamme tehdä finanssipalveluista Suomelle vientituotteen. UB:n visiona on olla asiakkailleen haluttu kumppani varallisuuden hoidossa ja taloudellisena neuvonantajana. Voimakkaasti kasvava määrä ammatti- ja yksityissijoittajia luottaa meihin. Tämä on paitsi merkittävä innostuksen lähde joukkueellemme myös paras tae sille, että kasvutarinamme jatkuu.  Meillä on vahva usko siihen, että UB kirjoittaa suomalaista finanssialan historiaa myös jatkossa! United Bankers Oyj on suomalainen, vuonna 1986 perustettu sijoitusalan konserni. Yhtiön liiketoiminta-alueisiin kuuluvat varainhoito, arvopaperinvälitys, investointipankkitoiminta ja rahastojen hallinnointi. Varainhoidossa yhtiö on erikoistunut reaaliomaisuussijoittamiseen. United Bankers on pääasiassa avainhenkilöidensä omistama ja konsernin palveluksessa työskentelee 102 henkilöä (12/2016). Yhtiön liikevaihto vuonna 2016 oli 20,1 miljoonaa euroa ja liikevoitto 1,5 miljoonaa euroa. Konsernin hallinnoitavat varat ovat noin 2,0 miljardia euroa (12/2016). Yhtiö on ollut listattuna First North Finland -markkinapaikalla marraskuusta 2014 lähtien. Tutustu tarkemmin United Bankers Oyj:hin osoitteessa www.unitedbankers.fi.


The new method makes it possible, for example, to compare and differentiate the functioning of brain networks in drug addicts and healthy individuals, thus advancing the study of the symptoms and effects of addiction on the brain. The method can also be used to more effectively analyse the functioning of critical complex systems, such as power distribution networks, airport connections and even social networks like Facebook and Twitter. Researcher Cristina Masoller explained the advantages of the new approach: "Imagine you have a power distribution system consisting of two interconnected networks, each with the same number of links, and one network loses a link because of a breakdown. With the methods we've had up until now, it's only been possible to determine the difference due to that missing link. With our method, we can also determine the precise location of the lost link and its importance in relation to the system—that is, whether its absence will significantly hinder the distribution of power." Currently, it is very difficult to differentiate, distinguish and compare the functioning and structure of networks that have hundreds of thousands of interconnected nodes and form so-called complex systems. This is true of brain networks and connections. Understanding their structures, determining differences between connections and diagnosing dysfunctions are complex tasks. Until now, there was no precise and effective way to recognise the presence or absence of critical links that connect or disconnect network components, because if they are not identified, it is difficult to ensure that they are functioning properly in the transmission of information. According to Masoller, "That's why our method is a significant advance in the study of complex systems. It indicates, with a high degree of precision, how important failed connections are in relation to the functioning of a complex system." In addition to identifying and naming the nodes in a network, "We can reliably calculate the distances between the points it comprises. Thanks to mathematics, we've pulled it off. Now scientists have a useful tool for studying complex systems with more certainty and precision," said the UPC researcher. According to UB researcher Díaz-Guilera: "Our method also makes it possible to find out how a particular topological feature was formed. Defining the distance between networks allows us to generate virtual networks based on specific mathematical models and see which one gets us closest to reality. Networks that expand based on geographical proximity, such as transport networks, are different from those whose growth is driven by affinity, such as social networks. Understanding how a network was formed, based on these mathematical models, allows us to determine what its strengths and vulnerabilities will be." The methods available to the scientific community up until now could be used to detect a difference in the number of connections in a network or even to determine the number of connections that were not working, but existing methods could not be used to work out the location of damaged connections or whether they were really interrupting the flow of information in the network as a whole. Explore further: Connections between groups of people determine the speed at which a virus spreads More information: Tiago A. Schieber et al. Quantification of network structural dissimilarities, Nature Communications (2017). DOI: 10.1038/ncomms13928

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