West Lafayette, IN, United States

Tymora Analytical Operations, Llc

www.tymora-analytical.com
West Lafayette, IN, United States
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 299.97K | Year: 2013

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Although some gene mutations can predict response to certain targeted therapies, single-gene testing has limits. Multiple important signaling pathways that may be the causes of human malignancy have continuously been discovered and dissected. Pathway and network diagnostic tests are challenging but are clearly on the way. Through this NIH STTR Phase I study, we will develop a hybrid phosphoproteomic platform to differentiate leukemia at the molecular level. The platformfeatures two innovative products recently introduced by us which are based on multi-functionalized water-soluble nanopolymers, allowing for highly selective, sensitive and simple qualitative and quantitative assessment of protein phosphorylation without the use of expensive phosphospecific antibodies. Due to its size and unique properties, it also offers the capability for multiplexed detection of phosphorylation and total protein amount simultaneously. Combined with targeted mass spectrometric analysis, this hybrid platform will be a powerful tool for biomedical research and development, particularly in the field of leukemia treatment, and a potential clinical tool for cancer diagnosis. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: Protein phosphorylation relates to the onset and development of many cancer types, particularly leukemia, and a highly efficient technology for phosphorylation analysis is critical for cancer research. This NIH STTR will support an effort to develop an innovative technology into commercial products that equip researchers with powerful tools and new directions to combat the devastating disease.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2011

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I project addresses the unmet needs for effective analysis of protein phosphorylation, a process where a phosphate group is added to a protein to change its function. Protein phosphorylation is a crucial modification of proteins; its abnormalities have been implicated in many diseases. Therefore, assessing the phosphorylation status of individual proteins or classes of proteins, qualitatively or quantitatively, has become a routine but extremely important step in the majority of life science research labs. Existing technologies have glaring deficiencies, including low reproducibility, poor recovery, high cost, reduced selectivity and prolonged experiment time. The platform technology to be developed during this Phase I project will greatly alleviate these shortcomings by providing lucrative, general approaches for phosphorylation analyses. The technologies will enable general phosphorylation detection, cost-effective inhibitor screenings, kinase/phosphatase activity quantitation, and efficient phosphopeptide enrichment for proteomic experiments.

The broader/commercial impacts of this research are the development of platform technology to improve a set of biochemical assays, and help the discovery of new therapeutic targets. Protein phosphorylation and kinase inhibitors as drug targets are currently at the peak of research and development (R&D), responsible for over 30% of the total drug discovery expenses. These R&D activities could greatly benefit from the proposed technologies due to their innovative design and versatile features for optimum efficiency and the ability to reproducibly explore phosphorylation events in unprecedented depth. These should provide invaluable tools and address needs of many bioscience research labs/facilities in academic and industrial settings.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 300.00K | Year: 2012

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): With recent technical advances, multiple important signaling pathways that may be the causes of human malignancy have continuously been discovered and dissected. The vast majority of these signaling pathways involve reversible protein phosphorylation, and the information on the location and dynamics of phosphorylation provides important mechanisms on how the signaling networks function and interact. While translational research gradually shifts from lab models to clinical samples, with the ultimate goal of identifying cancer biomarkers, a simple and reliable phosphorylation assay method is still missing for routine detection of phosphorylation in complex and typically heterogeneous clinical samples. Through this NIH SBIR Phase I study we will develop soluble nanopolymer-based reagents, termed PolyMAC (Polymer-based Metal Ion Affinity Capture), into commercial products for the highly efficient isolation of phosphopeptides. This novel design takes advantage of not only theproperties of multifunctionalized nanoparticles, but more importantly, the soluble nature of the molecule, allowing for the chelation of a limited amount of phosphopeptides in the solution phase for optimum efficiency and maximum yield. We propose to finalize optimization and scalability of the reagents as commercial products. In addition, high throughput formats for comprehensive phosphoproteomic analyses will be developed to address needs of many cancer biology and proteomics research labs/facilities.PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: Protein phosphorylation relates to the onset and development of many cancer types and a highly efficient technology for phosphorylation analysis is critical for cancer research. This NIH SBIR will support an effort to develop an innovative technology into commercial products that equip researchers with powerful tools and new directions to combat the devastating disease.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 147.51K | Year: 2012

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): With recent technical advances, multiple important signaling pathways that may be the causes of human malignancy have continuously been discovered and dissected. The vast majority of these signaling pathways involve reversible protein phosphorylation, and the information on the location and dynamics of phosphorylation provides important mechanisms on how the signaling networks function and interact. While translational research gradually shifts from lab models to clinical samples, with the ultimate goal of identifying cancer biomarkers, a simple and reliable phosphorylation assay method is still missing for routine detection of phosphorylation in complex and typically heterogeneous clinical samples. Through this NIH SBIRPhase I study, we will further develop a novel strategy for phosphorylation assay, termed pIMAGO (phospho-imaging) that has recently been introduced by us, into commercial products for simple, routine phosphorylation assays. This novel design takes advantage of not only the quantum size properties of the soluble nanoparticles, but also of the multi-functionalized nature of the molecule, allowing for highly selective, sensitive and simple qualitative and quantitative assessment of protein phosphorylation without the use of either radioactive isotopes or expensive phosphospecific antibodies. Due to its size and unique properties, it also offers the capability for multiplexed detection of phosphorylation and total protein amount simultaneously. We propose to optimize the technology for on-membrane phosphoprotein detection in routine biomedical research. In addition, we will develop a novel fluorescence-based pIMAGO reagent for direct detection and multiplexed experiments to add another dimension for biomedicalresearch and development. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: Protein phosphorylation relates to the onset and development of many cancer types and a highly efficient technology for phosphorylation analysis is critical for cancer research. This NIH SBIR will support an effort to develop an innovative technology into commercial products that equip researchers with powerful tools and new directions to combat the devastating disease.


Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 500.00K | Year: 2013

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II project addresses the unmet needs for effective analysis of protein phosphorylation, a process where a phosphate group is added to a protein to change its function. Protein phosphorylation is a crucial modification of proteins; its abnormalities have been implicated in many diseases. Therefore, assessing the phosphorylation status of individual proteins or classes of proteins, qualitatively or quantitatively, has become a routine but extremely important step in the majority of life science research labs. Existing technologies have glaring deficiencies, including low reproducibility, poor recovery, high cost, reduced selectivity and prolonged experiment time. The platform technology to be developed during this Phase II project will greatly alleviate these shortcomings by providing lucrative, general approaches for phosphorylation analyses. The technologies will enable general phosphorylation detection, cost-effective cancer inhibitor screenings, and kinase/phosphatase activity quantitation for new drug discovery. The broader impact/commercial potential of this project is the development of platform technology to improve a set of biochemical assays, thus enabling the discovery of new therapeutic targets and drugs. Protein phosphorylation and kinase inhibitors as drug targets are currently at the peak of research and development (R & D), responsible for over 30% of the total drug discovery expenses. These R & D activities could greatly benefit from the proposed technologies due to their innovative design and versatile features for optimum efficiency, and the ability to reproducibly explore phosphorylation events in unprecedented depth. These should provide invaluable tools and address needs of many bioscience research labs/facilities in academic and industrial settings.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: National Institutes of Health | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 897.13K | Year: 2015

DESCRIPTION provided by applicant With recent technical advances multiple important signaling pathways that may be the causes of human malignancy have continuously been discovered and dissected The vast majority of these signaling pathways involve reversible protein phosphorylation and the information on the location and dynamics of phosphorylation provides important mechanisms on how the signaling networks function and interact While translational research gradually shifts from lab models to clinical samples with the ultimate goal of identifying cancer biomarkers a simple and reliable phosphorylation assay method is still missing for routine detection of phosphorylation in complex and typically heterogeneous clinical samples Through this NIH SBIR Phase II study we will further develop a novel strategy for phosphorylation assay termed pIMAGO phospho imaging which has recently been introduced and commercialized by us into highly effective products for simple and routine phosphorylation assays This novel design takes advantage of not only the quantum size properties of the soluble nanoparticles but also of the multi functionalized nature of the molecule allowing for highly selective sensitive and simple qualitative and quantitative assessment of protein phosphorylation without the use of either radioactive isotopes or expensive phosphospecific antibodies Due to its size and unique properties it also offers the capability for multiplexed detection of phosphorylation and total protein amount simultaneously We propose to optimize the technology for universal on membrane phosphoprotein detection in routine biological and biomedical research In addition we will develop a set of novel pIMAGO based strategies for multiplexed detection of phosphorylation in antibody microarray and functional reversed phase array formats The new applications will add another dimension to traditional biomedical research and development PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE Protein phosphorylation relates to the onset and development of many cancer types and a highly efficient technology for phosphorylation analysis is critical for cancer research This NIH SBIR Phase II project will support an effort to develop an innovative phosphorylation analysis technology into commercial products that equip researchers with powerful tools and new directions to combat the devastating disease


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 619.95K | Year: 2013

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II project addresses the unmet needs for effective analysis of protein phosphorylation, a process where a phosphate group is added to a protein to change its function. Protein phosphorylation is a crucial modification of proteins; its abnormalities have been implicated in many diseases. Therefore, assessing the phosphorylation status of individual proteins or classes of proteins, qualitatively or quantitatively, has become a routine but extremely important step in the majority of life science research labs. Existing technologies have glaring deficiencies, including low reproducibility, poor recovery, high cost, reduced selectivity and prolonged experiment time. The platform technology to be developed during this Phase II project will greatly alleviate these shortcomings by providing lucrative, general approaches for phosphorylation analyses. The technologies will enable general phosphorylation detection, cost-effective cancer inhibitor screenings, and kinase/phosphatase activity quantitation for new drug discovery.

The broader impact/commercial potential of this project is the development of platform technology to improve a set of biochemical assays, thus enabling the discovery of new therapeutic targets and drugs. Protein phosphorylation and kinase inhibitors as drug targets are currently at the peak of research and development (R&D), responsible for over 30% of the total drug discovery expenses. These R&D activities could greatly benefit from the proposed technologies due to their innovative design and versatile features for optimum efficiency, and the ability to reproducibly explore phosphorylation events in unprecedented depth. These should provide invaluable tools and address needs of many bioscience research labs/facilities in academic and industrial settings.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: National Institutes of Health | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2015

DESCRIPTION provided by applicant With recent technical advances multiple important signaling pathways that may be the causes of human malignancy have continuously been discovered and dissected The vast majority of these signaling pathways involve reversible protein phosphorylation and the information on the location and dynamics of phosphorylation provides important mechanisms on how the signaling networks function and interact While mass spectrometry has become an exceptionally useful tool for phosphoproteome analyses extensive experiments are very labor intensive and cost prohibitive to most researchers As a result despite many large scale phosphoproteomic studies the critical need for a routine and effective analysis of relevant phosphoproteins has not been addressed Through this NIH SBIR Phase I study we will develop a novel strategy for gel based phosphoproteome analysis called Difference Gel Electrophoresis of Phosphoproteome DiGEP and translate it into commercial products for simpler phosphorylation discovery assays The novel design will take advantage of the small molecule platform functionalized with titanium ions for selective binding to phosphoproteins and a UV based crosslinker to immobilize the reagent onto the bound phosphoprotein In addition two different but structurally similar fluorophores will be used to differentiate the phosphoproteome profiles of two samples ran on a single gel The strategy will allow quantitative measurements of phosphorylation between the two samples and will pin point which contrasted phosphoproteins should be further analyzed by mass spectrometry The proposed approach offers the promise of significant cost reduction and is fully compatible with gel systems and imaging software already developed for Difference Gel Electrophoresis DIGE PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE Protein phosphorylation relates to the onset and development of many cancer types and a highly efficient technology for phosphorylation analysis is critical for cancer research This NIH SBIR will support an effort to develop an innovative technology into commercial products that equip researchers with powerful tools and new directions to combat the devastating disease


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: National Institutes of Health | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 225.00K | Year: 2016

PROJECT SUMMARY Reverse phase protein array RPPA has emerged as a promising antibody based highly quantitative proteomic technology suitable for profiling proteins in hundreds to thousands of patient samples The throughput sensitivity and cost effectiveness of RPPA together with its ability to deal with minuscule sample amounts have propelled applications of the technology in basic preclinical and clinical research fields The technology which relies heavily on the paucity of high quality monospecific antibodies however is only centered on detecting a few key signaling molecules due to limited availability of high quality phosphospecific antibodies In this NIH STTR Phase I study we will develop a novel RPPA platform based on metal ion functionalized soluble nanopolymers into commercial products for sensitive high throughput profiling of signaling molecules without the limitation of antibodies The novel RPPA platform will be applied to distinguish aggressive from indolent human prostate tumors in xenograft mouse models We hypothesis that prostate cancer can be classified by measuring phosphorylation changes on key oncogenes and thus a RPPA platform can be used as a discovery and preclinical tool to distinguish aggressive from indolent tumors The following aims will be completed Aim Optimization of functionalized RPPA for capture and detection of phosphopropteins Aim Pathway activation profiling in indolent and aggressive prostate cancer xenograft mouse models By the completion of Phase I study we expect that an analytical platform can be established with high sensitivity wide dynamic range excellent reproducibility and affordable cost PROJECT NARRATIVE Protein phosphorylation relates to the onset and development of many cancer types and a highly efficient technology for phosphorylation analysis is critical for cancer research This NIH STTR Phase I project will support an effort to develop an innovative phosphorylation analysis technology into commercial products that equip researchers with powerful tools and new directions to combat the devastating disease


PubMed | Tymora Analytical Operations, Llc
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of the American Chemical Society | Year: 2016

Glycoproteins have vast structural diversity that plays an important role in many biological processes and have great potential as disease biomarkers. Here, we report a novel functionalized reverse phase protein array (RPPA), termed polymer-based reverse phase glycoprotein array (polyGPA), to capture and profile glycoproteomes specifically, and validate glycoproteins. Nitrocellulose membrane functionalized with globular hydroxyaminodendrimers was used to covalently capture preoxidized glycans on glycoproteins from complex protein samples such as biofluids. The captured glycoproteins were subsequently detected using the same validated antibodies as in RPPA. We demonstrated the outstanding specificity, sensitivity, and quantitative capabilities of polyGPA by capturing and detecting purified as well as endogenous -1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) in human plasma. We further applied quantitative N-glycoproteomics and the strategy to validate a panel of glycoproteins identified as potential biomarkers for bladder cancer by analyzing urine glycoproteins from bladder cancer patients or matched healthy individuals.

Loading Tymora Analytical Operations, Llc collaborators
Loading Tymora Analytical Operations, Llc collaborators