Turtle Conservation Project TCP

Panadura, Sri Lanka

Turtle Conservation Project TCP

Panadura, Sri Lanka
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Ekanayake E.M.L.,University of Peradeniya | Kapurusinghe T.,Turtle Conservation Project TCP | Saman M.M.,Turtle Conservation Project TCP | Rathnakumara D.S.,Turtle Conservation Project TCP | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Threatened Taxa | Year: 2017

We determined the genetic diversity of the Green Turtle Chelonia mydas (Linneaus, 1758) nesting at Kosgoda rookery, the second largest sea turtle aggregation on the southwestern coast of Sri Lanka. Skin tissue samples were collected from 68 nesting females and genetic diversity was estimated using six microsatellite loci. High genetic diversity was observed within the population as all loci analyzed were highly polymorphic with a total of 149 alleles observed. The mean number of alleles per locus was 24.7 and the mean observed and expected heterozygosity across all loci were 0.75 and 0.93, respectively. It appears that five out of six loci were not in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, while micro-checker analysis suggested that the Kosgoda Green Turtle population was possibly in equilibrium. The viability of a population is unlikely to be reduced if high genetic diversity is maintained within it. Although the Green Turtle population nesting at Kosgoda is small compared to other nesting rookeries in the world, the high genetic diversity observed suggests that the population may not be undergoing a bottleneck. © Ekanayake et al. 2017.


Richardson P.B.,Marine Conservation Society | Richardson P.B.,University of Exeter | Broderick A.C.,University of Exeter | Coyne M.S.,Seaturtle.org | And 8 more authors.
Marine Biology | Year: 2013

Satellite transmitters were deployed on ten green turtles (Chelonia mydas) nesting in Rekawa Sanctuary (RS-80.851°E 6.045°N), Sri Lanka, during 2006 and 2007 to determine inter-nesting and migratory behaviours and foraging habitats. Nine turtles subsequently nested at RS and demonstrated two inter-nesting strategies linked to the location of their residence sites. Three turtles used local shallow coastal sites within 60 km of RS during some or all of their inter-nesting periods and then returned to and settled at these sites on completion of their breeding seasons. In contrast, five individuals spent inter-nesting periods proximate to RS and then migrated to and settled at distant (>350 km) shallow coastal residence sites. Another turtle also spent inter-nesting periods proximate to RS and then migrated to a distant oceanic atoll and made forays into oceanic waters for 42 days before transmissions ceased. This behavioural plasticity informs conservation management beyond protection at the nesting beach. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Loading Turtle Conservation Project TCP collaborators
Loading Turtle Conservation Project TCP collaborators