FL, United States
FL, United States

Time filter

Source Type

-- Raymond Vines, CTP, CPA, CFO of Turningpoint Communications (www.turningpointcommunications.com), a treasury management industry-focused marketing communications and business development firm that promotes clients' best practices and thought leadership and engages clients' customers and centers of influence in dynamic and unexpected ways, was recently reappointed to the Dallas Association for Financial Professionals (www.dallasafp.org)Board of Directors, in the role of ATTA (Alliance of Texas Treasury Associations)Representative.DAFP is a professional association made up of individuals in treasury and financial careers in Dallas and the surrounding areas, and offers services such as treasury education, relationship building, regional collaboration and community development.As ATTA Representative, Vines is responsible for representing Dallas Association for Financial Professionals among a group of 10 leaders from Dallas and four other Texas Treasury Associations:Austin, Houston, San Antonio, and Fort Worth. He is responsible for creating and maintaining best practices for the conference production, including education, administration, communication, programming, special events and all other aspects of the conference.Vines originally joined the DAFP Board as the Association's Treasurer in 2010.  In addition to his role with Turningpoint Communications, Vines also concurrently serves as Director of Treasury for Dean Foods in Dallas, where he is responsible for treasury management, banking relationship management, and process improvement.  He is also an educator for Rice University, where he teaches classes to prepare treasury professionals for the Association for Financial Professionals Accreditation, Certified Treasury Professional (CTP) exam. An active participant in enhancing the role of treasury management throughout his career, Vines is also co-chairing the TEXPO conference when it returns to Dallas in 2018.Laurel Egan Kenny, founder and CEO of Turningpoint Communications, is also a member of the DAFP Board of Directors, serving in the role of Communication/Social Media Chair and serving on the TEXPO Committee in support of communications, IT, and application initiatives."I am proud of my affiliation with DAFP and honored to be reappointed to the organization's board," said Vines.  "We value the role DAFP plays for those in corporate treasury, accounting, banking, and other financial services, especially given how the organization is able to benefit clients of Turningpoint Communications.  I look forward to my continued involvement with this critically important organization."In its 10year, Turningpoint Communications ( www.turningpointcommunications.com ) is a national marketing and business development support firm focused on financial services, high-tech, retail, academia, healthcare, and membership organizations.  Turningpoint offers industry-specific programming and deliverables that get results by promoting their clients' thought leadership, best practices and engaging constituents in dynamic ways.Turningpoint Communications was founded by Laurel Egan Kenny, MSCM, MBA, in 2007 after 13 years of building and leading marketing and business development teams for two large, global Fortune 100 financial services firms in wealth and treasury management divisions.  Laurel served on the Boards of Directors of the New England Association for Financial Professionals from 2007 to 2013 (including President) and continues to serve the Dallas Association for Financial Professionals as Communications Chair (2013 to present). She is also the Social Media Chair for the Alliance of Texas Treasury Association's TEXPO 2018 Conference when it returns to Dallas and is an award winning and presenting Regional Officer of the national Association for Financial Professionals. Laurel built and grew the commercial Global Solutions Group's marketing and business development servicing discipline at Sovereign Bancorp (now Santander) and, as a founding member of a corporate entrepreneurial wealth management division at State Street, she served as a member of a business development and relationship management team that grew assets under administration from $0 to $150 billion in two years.  Laurel presents nationally on treasury management-related topics, as well as on marketing and business development practices, including social media and thought leadership.For more information about Turningpoint Communications, please visit www.turningpointcommunications.com.


Stout N.L.,Breast Care Center | Andrews K.,Cancer Control Science | Binkley J.M.,TurningPoint | Schmitz K.H.,University of Pennsylvania | Smith R.A.,Cancer Control Science
Cancer | Year: 2012

The prospective surveillance model proposes a paradigm shift in the delivery of care for patients with breast cancer. The model is based on clinical research and clinical practice experience that was reviewed and discussed at a multidisciplinary meeting. The model identifies critical physical sequelae of treatment as well as timeframes for identification of and surveillance for these issues. Although the model of ongoing assessment for physical impairment and early rehabilitative intervention creates a framework for care, broad support and active dissemination among a variety of stakeholders will be required to transform patient care. Translating research findings to transform practice often occurs on a protracted timeline. The authors sought participation from a variety of stakeholder representatives throughout the process of creating this model in an effort to ensure that it reflects the realities of the patient experience and care delivery, to incorporate their input regarding the construct and viability of the model, and to potentiate effective and efficient strategies for implementation. This article summarizes comments from stakeholder representatives concerning the prospective surveillance model for rehabilitation for women treated for breast cancer. Concerns addressed include the scope of impairments included in the model, the potential creation of barriers to exercise and participation in community exercise programs, and cost and feasibility issues. Stakeholder disseminations strategies are also presented. Overall, there is recognition by the stakeholder group that this model calls attention to important unmet needs and defines a crucial opportunity to improve care for breast cancer survivors. © 2012 American Cancer Society.


Stout N.L.,National Naval Medical Center | Binkley J.M.,TurningPoint | Schmitz K.H.,University of Pennsylvania | Andrews K.,American Cancer Society | And 13 more authors.
Cancer | Year: 2012

BACKGROUND: The current model of care for individuals with breast cancer focuses on treatment of the disease, followed by ongoing surveillance to detect recurrence. This approach lacks attention to patients' physical and functional well-being. Breast cancer treatment sequelae can lead to physical impairments and functional limitations. Common impairments include pain, fatigue, upper-extremity dysfunction, lymphedema, weakness, joint arthralgia, neuropathy, weight gain, cardiovascular effects, and osteoporosis. Evidence supports prospective surveillance for early identification and treatment as a means to prevent or mitigate many of these concerns.This article proposes a prospective surveillance model for physical rehabilitation and exercise that can be integrated with disease treatment to create a more comprehensive approach to survivorship health care.The goals of the model are to promote surveillance for common physical impairments and functional limitations associated with breast cancer treatment; to provide education to facilitate early identification of impairments; to introduce rehabilitation and exercise intervention when physical impairments are identified; and to promote and support physical activity and exercise behaviors through the trajectory of disease treatment and survivorship. METHODS: The model is the result of a multidisciplinary meeting of research and clinical experts in breast cancer survivorship and representatives of relevant professional and advocacy organizations. RESULTS/CONCLUSIONS: The proposed model identifies time points during breast cancer care for assessment of and education about physical impairments. Ultimately, implementation of the model may influence incidence and severity of breast cancer treatment-related physical impairments. As such, the model seeks to optimize function during and after treatment and positively influence a growing survivorship community. © 2012 American Cancer Society.


Binkley J.M.,TurningPoint | Harris S.R.,University of British Columbia | Levangie P.K.,Massachusetts General Hospital | Pearl M.,TurningPoint | And 3 more authors.
Cancer | Year: 2012

Women's experience of breast cancer is complex, affecting all aspects of life during and after treatment. Patients' perspectives about common impairments and functional limitations secondary to breast cancer treatment, including upper extremity motion restriction, lymphedema, fatigue, weight gain, pain, and chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, are addressed.Women often report being uninformed regarding these side effects and surprised that they do not always disappear after treatment, but remain part of their lives. Breast cancer patients express strong, unmet needs for education, information, and intervention for these side effects. Evidence suggests that rehabilitation and exercise are effective in preventing and managing many physical side effects of breast cancer treatment. Nevertheless, few women are referred to rehabilitation during or after treatment, and fewer receive baseline assessments of impairment and function to facilitate early detection of impairment and functional limitations. The prospective surveillance model of rehabilitation will serve the needs of women with breast cancer by providing education and information about treatment side effects, reducing the incidence and burden of side effects through early identification and treatment, and enhancing access to timely rehabilitation. Integration of exercise as a component of the model benefits patients at every phase of survivorship, by addressing individual concerns about exercise during and after treatment and highlighting the important contribution of exercise to overall health and survival. The prospective surveillance model of rehabilitation can meet the evident and often expressed needs of survivors for information, guidance, and intervention - thus addressing, and potentially improving, overall quality of life for individuals diagnosed with and treated for breast cancer. © 2012 American Cancer Society.


Campbell K.L.,University of British Columbia | Pusic A.L.,Sloan Kettering Cancer Center | Zucker D.S.,Swedish Cancer Institute | McNeely M.L.,University of Alberta | And 3 more authors.
Cancer | Year: 2012

A significant proportion of adult breast cancer survivors experience deficits in function and restriction in participation in life roles that may remain many years after diagnosis. Function is a complex construct that takes into account the interactions between an individual, their health condition, and the social and personal context in which they live. Research to date on limitations in activities of daily living, upper extremity function, and functional capacity in breast cancer survivors illustrates the need for prospective measurement of function using measures that are sensitive to the unique issues of breast cancer survivors and the need for the development of effective rehabilitation interventions to improve function. Limitations in function have a significant impact on quality of life, but less is known about the implications on return to work and survival, as well as the impact of other comorbidities and aging on the function limitations in breast cancer survivors. This review provides a rationale for the integration of measures of function into breast cancer care to more fully appreciate the functional limitations associated with breast cancer diagnosis and treatment and to aid in the development of better rehabilitation care for breast cancer survivors. © 2012 American Cancer Society.


McNeely M.L.,University of Alberta | Binkley J.M.,TurningPoint | Pusic A.L.,Sloan Kettering Cancer Center | Campbell K.L.,University of British Columbia | And 2 more authors.
Cancer | Year: 2012

Appropriate and timely rehabilitation is vital in the recovery from breast cancer surgeries, including breast conserving surgery, mastectomy, axillary lymph node dissection (ALND), and breast reconstruction. This article describes the incidence, prevalence, risk factors and time course for early postoperative effects and the role of prospective surveillance as a rehabilitation strategy to prevent and mitigate them. The most common early postoperative effects include wound issues such as cellulitis, flap necrosis, abscess, dehiscence, hematoma, and seroma. Appropriate treatment is necessary to avoid delay in wound healing that may increase the risk of long-term morbidity, unduly postpone systemic and radiation therapy, and delay rehabilitation. The presence of upper quarter dysfunction (UQD), defined as restricted upper quarter mobility, pain, lymphedema, and impaired sensation and strength, has been reported in over half of survivors after treatment for breast cancer. Moreover, evidence suggests that survivors who undergo breast reconstruction may be at higher risk of UQD. Ensuring the survivor's optimum functioning in the early postoperative time period is critical in the overall recovery from breast cancer. The formal collection of objective measures along with patient-reported outcome measures is recommended for the early detection of postoperative morbidity. Prospective surveillance, including preoperative assessment and structured surveillance, allows for early identification and timely rehabilitation. Early evidence supports a prospective approach to address and minimize postoperative effects. © 2012 American Cancer Society.


TurningPoint | Entity website

TurningPoint was established in 2014, by an innovative group of healthcare executives that believe strongly in promoting improvements in the quality and affordability of healthcare. Our leadership team is comprised of clinical and administrative executives from across the country that bring the highest integrity and values to healthcare


Trademark
TurningPoint | Date: 2015-10-27

Computer software for the field of warehousing and distribution, to manage transactional data, provide statistical analysis, and produce notifications and reports.


Womens experience of breast cancer is complex, affecting all aspects of life during and after treatment. Patients perspectives about common impairments and functional limitations secondary to breast cancer treatment, including upper extremity motion restriction, lymphedema, fatigue, weight gain, pain, and chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, are addressed. Women often report being uninformed regarding these side effects and surprised that they do not always disappear after treatment, but remain part of their lives. Breast cancer patients express strong, unmet needs for education, information, and intervention for these side effects. Evidence suggests that rehabilitation and exercise are effective in preventing and managing many physical side effects of breast cancer treatment. Nevertheless, few women are referred to rehabilitation during or after treatment, and fewer receive baseline assessments of impairment and function to facilitate early detection of impairment and functional limitations. The prospective surveillance model of rehabilitation will serve the needs of women with breast cancer by providing education and information about treatment side effects, reducing the incidence and burden of side effects through early identification and treatment, and enhancing access to timely rehabilitation. Integration of exercise as a component of the model benefits patients at every phase of survivorship, by addressing individual concerns about exercise during and after treatment and highlighting the important contribution of exercise to overall health and survival. The prospective surveillance model of rehabilitation can meet the evident and often expressed needs of survivors for information, guidance, and intervention--thus addressing, and potentially improving, overall quality of life for individuals diagnosed with and treated for breast cancer.

Loading TurningPoint collaborators
Loading TurningPoint collaborators