Tumour Biology Center Freiburg

Freiburg, Germany

Tumour Biology Center Freiburg

Freiburg, Germany
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Kneis S.,Albert Ludwigs University of Freiburg | Wehrle A.,Albert Ludwigs University of Freiburg | Freyler K.,Albert Ludwigs University of Freiburg | Lehmann K.,Albert Ludwigs University of Freiburg | And 6 more authors.
Clinical Neurophysiology | Year: 2016

Objective: Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a common side effect of cancer treatment. Resulting sensory and motor dysfunctions often lead to functional impairments like gait or balance disorders. As the underlying neuromuscular mechanisms are not fully understood, we compared balance performance of CIPN patients with healthy controls (CON) to specify differences responsible for postural instability. Methods: 20 breast cancer patients with CIPN (PAT) and 16 matched CONs were monitored regarding centre of pressure displacement (COP) and electromyographic activity of M. soleus, gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior, rectus femoris and biceps femoris. We calculated antagonistic co-contraction indices (CCI) and elicited soleus H-reflexes to evaluate changes in the elicitability and sensitivity of spinal reflex circuitry. Results: PAT's COP displacement was greater than CON's (p = 013) and correlated significantly with the level of CCIs and self-reported CIPN symptoms. PAT revealed prolonged H-wave latency (p = 021), decreased H-reflex elicitability (p = 001), and increased H-reflex sensitivity from bi- to monopedal stance (p = 004). Conclusions: We summarise that CIPN causes balance impairments and leads to changes in elicitability and sensitivity of spinal reflex circuitry associated with postural instability. We assume that increased simultaneous antagonistic muscle activation may be used as a safety strategy for joint stiffness to compensate for neuromuscular degradation. Significance: Sensorimotor training has the potential to influence neuromuscular mechanisms in order to improve balance performance. Therefore, this training modality should be evaluated as a possible treatment strategy for CIPN. © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology.


PubMed | Albert Ludwigs University of Freiburg and Tumour Biology Center Freiburg
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Clinical neurophysiology : official journal of the International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology | Year: 2016

Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a common side effect of cancer treatment. Resulting sensory and motor dysfunctions often lead to functional impairments like gait or balance disorders. As the underlying neuromuscular mechanisms are not fully understood, we compared balance performance of CIPN patients with healthy controls (CON) to specify differences responsible for postural instability.20 breast cancer patients with CIPN (PAT) and 16 matched CONs were monitored regarding centre of pressure displacement (COP) and electromyographic activity of M. soleus, gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior, rectus femoris and biceps femoris. We calculated antagonistic co-contraction indices (CCI) and elicited soleus H-reflexes to evaluate changes in the elicitability and sensitivity of spinal reflex circuitry.PATs COP displacement was greater than CONs (p=.013) and correlated significantly with the level of CCIs and self-reported CIPN symptoms. PAT revealed prolonged H-wave latency (p=.021), decreased H-reflex elicitability (p=.001), and increased H-reflex sensitivity from bi- to monopedal stance (p=.004).We summarise that CIPN causes balance impairments and leads to changes in elicitability and sensitivity of spinal reflex circuitry associated with postural instability. We assume that increased simultaneous antagonistic muscle activation may be used as a safety strategy for joint stiffness to compensate for neuromuscular degradation.Sensorimotor training has the potential to influence neuromuscular mechanisms in order to improve balance performance. Therefore, this training modality should be evaluated as a possible treatment strategy for CIPN.


Creutzfeldt A.,University of Hamburg | Suling A.,University of Hamburg | Oechsle K.,University of Hamburg | Mehnert A.,University of Leipzig | And 5 more authors.
BMC Palliative Care | Year: 2016

Background: Systemic treatment has proven to improve physical symptoms in patients with advanced cancer. Relationship between quality of life (QoL) or symptom burden (SYB) and treatment efficacy (tumour response and survival) is poorly described. Therefore, we evaluated the predictive value of pretreatment QoL and SYB on treatment outcomes. Methods: Eligible patients had metastatic gastrointestinal cancers and were about to receive 1st/2nd line palliative chemotherapy. 47 patients were consecutively enrolled. QoL and SYB were assessed by EORTC QLQ-C30 and MSKCC MSAS questionnaires before treatment and after first response evaluation after 8-12 weeks. Logistic regression analysis of QoL and SYB for prediction of objective treatment efficacy was performed. Patients were categorized according to response rate (RR) based on RECIST1.1 and progression free survival (PFS). PFS was categorized by a ratio (individual PFS/expected PFS) in above median (ratio ≥ 1) or below median PFS (ratio < 1). QoL and SYB were analysed for RR groups (partial response, stable or progressive disease) and PFS ratio (PFSR). Results: Objective response to chemotherapy and increase in PFS were associated with better pretreatment QoL and less SYB. Patients with future objective treatment efficacy (PFSR ≥ 1) evidenced clinically relevant better role/emotional/cognitive/social functioning and less fatigue and appetite loss at baseline in comparison to PFSR < 1 (>10 points difference). Lowest scores in all functioning scales at treatment start were seen in patients with future PFSR < 1. Global health status (EORTC), PSYCH subscale and global distress index (MSAS) predicted PFSR, even if adjusted for gender, age, cancer type, ECOG and line of treatment (p < 0.05). Interestingly, improved QoL and SYB (subjective benefit) were noted even in patients with worse pretreatment status and no objective tumour response. Conclusion: Future non-responders seem to show distinct QoL patterns before chemotherapy. This may facilitate early detection of patients deriving less or even no benefit from treatment regarding prolongation of survival. Even in patients with primarily progressive disease QoL and SYB may improve during treatment. Integration of QoL and SYB assessment into decision-making about palliative chemotherapy seem to be an important approach to improve patient outcome and should be further evaluated. © 2016 Creutzfeldt et al.

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