Tufts Medical Center and Tufts Cancer Center

Boston, MA, United States

Tufts Medical Center and Tufts Cancer Center

Boston, MA, United States

Time filter

Source Type

Burney S.,Services Hospital | Irfan K.,Services Hospital | Saif M.W.,Tufts Medical Center and Tufts Cancer Center | Masud F.,King Edward Medical University
Journal of the Pancreas | Year: 2014

Research suggests a possible link between type 2 diabetes and several malignancies. Animal models have shown that hyperinsulinemic state underlying diabetes promotes tumor formation through stimulation of insulin-IGF-1 pathway; a possible role of inflammation is also proposed. One such link which has been under considerable study for years is that between diabetes and pancreatic cancer. Although epidemiological evidence points towards a reciprocal link between the two, the cause-effect relationship still remains unclear. This link was the subject of a large German epidemiological study presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting 2014 (Abstract 1604), which underscored the link between diabetes and some cancers. Schmidt et al. performed a retrospective database analysis over a 12 year period and reported an increased risk of certain types of cancer in diabetic patients. The most significant association (HR 2.17) was found for pancreatic cancer. Given the high mortality of pancreatic cancer, prevention through timely screening could play an important role in improving prognosis. Older subjects with recent-onset diabetes represent a high-risk group and hence are potential targets for pancreatic cancer screening thereby enabling its early diagnosis at a curable stage.


Burney S.,Services Hospital | Khawaja K.I.,Services Hospital | Saif M.W.,Tufts Medical Center and Tufts Cancer Center | Masud F.,King Edward Medical University
Journal of the Pancreas | Year: 2014

Pancreatic cancer, despite being a relatively less commonly occurring cancer is among the deadliest ones, leading to a grave prognosis. Surgery stands as the mainstay of treatment of pancreatic cancer but is an option in less than 15% patients owing to the late presentation of the tumor. Chemotherapy offers an important part of treatment but can adversely affect the quality of life because of devastating side effects and has limited survival benefit. Unavailability of effective and less toxic treatment options for pancreatic cancer has prompted the search for new treatment strategies. One such drug being considered for its potential anti-neoplastic role is the time-tested and widely used oral hypoglycemic drug, metformin. Metformin is proposed to target metabolic pathways involved in tumorigenesis, specifically the AMPK- mTOR complex. Epidemiological evidence is mounting in favor of its role in various cancers both for treatment and prophylaxis. Herein, we aim to summarize the epidemiological data on metformin as a potential anti-cancer drug in various cancers followed by a look at some of the abstracts relating to this topic that were presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting 2014.

Loading Tufts Medical Center and Tufts Cancer Center collaborators
Loading Tufts Medical Center and Tufts Cancer Center collaborators