Dortmund, Germany
Dortmund, Germany

TU Dortmund University is a university in Dortmund, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany with over 20,000 students, and over 3,000 staff. It is situated in the Ruhr area, the fourth largest urban area in Europe.The university is highly ranked in terms of its research performance in the areas of physics, electrical engineering, chemistry and economics. Wikipedia.


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Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SPIRE-02-2016 | Award Amount: 6.54M | Year: 2016

The goal of CoPro is to develop and to demonstrate methods and tools for process monitoring and optimal dynamic planning, scheduling and control of plants, industrial sites and clusters under dynamic market conditions. CoPro will provide decision support to operators and managers and develop closed-loop solutions to achieve an optimally energy and resource efficient production. In most plants of the process industries, the energy and resource efficiency of the production depends critically on discrete decisions on the use of equipment, shutdowns, product changeovers and cleaning or regeneration of equipment. CoPro will consider these discrete decisions in plant-wide dynamic optimization and develop integrated scheduling and control solutions. Advanced online data analytics will be developed for plant health and product quality monitoring. The detection of anomalies will trigger fast re-scheduling and re-optimization. CoPro will demonstrate advanced plant-wide and site-wide coordination and control in five typical use cases that cover a wide range of sectors of the process industries, and the whole value chain: - Petrochemical production site - Base chemicals and polymer production site - Recycling system in cellulose production - Consumer product formulation and packaging plant - Food processing plant In addition,CoPro will develop methods for the coordination of plants in industrial parks that belong to different companies, thus providing a basis for future industrial symbiosis. CoPro pays special attention to the role of operators and managers in plant-wide control solutions and to the deployment of advanced solutions in industrial sites with a heterogeneous IT environment. As the effort required for the development and maintenance of accurate plant models is the bottleneck for the development and long-term operation of advanced control and scheduling solutions, CoPro will develop methods for efficient modelling and for model quality monitoring and model adaption


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SC5-04-2015 | Award Amount: 5.85M | Year: 2016

The iSCAPE project aims to integrate and advance the control of air quality and carbon emissions in European cities in the context of climate change through the development of sustainable and passive air pollution remediation strategies, policy interventions and behavioural change initiatives. It will tackle the problem of reducing air pollution at target receptors with an innovative SME-led approach, focusing on the use of Passive Control Systems in urban spaces. Improvements in air quality, microclimate and behavioural aspects of urban dwellers will be achieved by applying real-world physical interventions on the urban tissue to alter ventilation rates and dispersion patterns in the selected cities assessed for future climate change scenarios and representative of different cultural&life styles in Europe. Through the approach of Living Labs the team will deploy a network of air quality and meteorological sensors (both stationary and mobile) and evaluate through analysis and a suite of up-to-date numerical modelling the benefits expected from the interventions on a neighbourhood and city-wide scale for several aspects ranging from quantification of pollutant concentration to exposure. iSCAPE encapsulates the concept of smart cities by promoting the use of low-cost sensors, engaging citizens in the use of alternative solution processes to environmental problems. iSCAPE will support sustainable urban development by promoting the sharing of results with policy-makers and planners using local test-cases, and providing scientific evidence ready-to-use solutions potentially leading to real-time operational interventions. This integrated approach will include the development and assessment of a framework aimed at changing the mobility behaviour of people by studying processes and dynamics that lead to more resilient, healthy, and sustainable cities, by bringing together theory from urban planning, public policy, urban and environmental sociology and urban geography.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-EID | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2015-EID | Award Amount: 3.63M | Year: 2016

The typical lifetime of an industrial process plant is between 30 and 50 years. Technologies to enhance the operation and optimization of process plants can both guide the development of new state-of-the-art process plants and, perhaps more pertinently, can ensure that the large installed base of existing plants operates efficiently. The PRONTO Consortium partners are strongly convinced that for Europe to stay competitive, the overriding challenge is the efficient and sustainable operation of assets already installed and running at the present time. Production involves flows of material and energy over an extended area through the distributed and interconnected equipment of the process network. Process plants also generate complex information from disparate sources in the form of measurements from the process, mechanical and electrical sub-systems, and elsewhere. Efficient and sustainable operation of assets over a timescale of 30-50 years therefore requires sophisticated approaches for managing information and managing resources to ensure optimal operation. The research topics of PRONTO are (i) data analytics for assessment of the condition and performance of networks of equipment used for production in the process industries, (ii) optimization of use of resources in process networks taking account of real-time information about the condition and performance of the process equipment, and (iii) new concepts for process operation identified as having high potential for impact by industrial partners. The consortium partners include leading universities and well-known companies with high reputations for innovation. The consortium offers the early stage researchers training under the European Industrial Doctorate scheme by involving the non-academic sector extensively in joint supervision of the doctoral training with a strong emphasis on industrially-relevant PhD projects leading to practical demonstrations.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: INSO-5-2015 | Award Amount: 2.99M | Year: 2016

Developing an enabling environment for social innovation that links actions across the whole field and supports the full exploitation of their potential is vital to addressing societal challenges both in Europe and globally. While there is increasing interest for social innovation as a means of addressing societal challenges, there is also considerable variation in the extent to which different countries and regions have embraced social innovation. There are many research and policy projects and incubation and acceleration programmes with valuable outcomes but these are still largely disconnected. Thus, the overarching aim of this project is to create a network of networks of social innovation actors. This Social Innovation Community (SIC) will identify, engage and connect actors including researchers, social innovators, citizens, policy-makers, as well as intermediaries, businesses, civil society organisations and public sector employees. Through our cross-cutting Work Packages, we will deliver engagement, research, experimentation, learning and policy activities that engage with and support each of the networks. We will ensure that our cross-cutting activities are complementary and build on each others work, rather than operating in silos. As such, this SIC aims to deepen and strengthen existing networks, forge new connections between networks, and create new links to actors and networks which hitherto have not been included in the field of social innovation. The aims of such a community are to generate new social innovations, develop and scale up successful ideas to share and spread knowledge more effectively in order to improve research, practice and policy-making. By creating an enabling environment for social innovation, the project will improve the overall framework conditions for social innovation in Europe. This in turn will support the creation of opportunities for growth and for overcoming the current social and economic crisis affecting much of Europe.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SPIRE-02-2016 | Award Amount: 5.90M | Year: 2016

The vision of COCOP is that complex process-industry plants are optimally run by operators with the guidance of a coordinating, real-time optimisation system. COCOP will strengthen the global position of the European process industry, which represents 20 per cent of the European manufacturing base with around 450,000 companies generating 1.6 billion in turnover and 6.8 million jobs. The projects objective is to enable plant-wide monitoring and control by using the model-based, predictive, coordinating optimisation concept in integration with plants automation systems. This ambitious approach will be developed and verified in co-operation of European universities, research institutes and industry. The Consortium comprises two universities, three research organisations, the leading copper-plant technology provider, two large companies from the process industry (steel and special chemicals) and four SMEs providing automation solutions. Technical objective is to define, design and implement a concept that integrates existing industrial control systems with efficient data management and optimisation methods and provides means to monitor and control large industrial production processes. The plant-wide monitoring and control comprehend computationally intensive data analysis and large scale optimisation. The social objective is to improve operator plant-wide awareness and reduce mental workload. COCOP will liaise with standardisation bodies (automation) to ensure a sustained impact of the projects results. Commercialisation of the solution by its process-automation industry partners will allow plant operators to approach optimal production and result in reduced energy and resource consumption, and decreased on-site material handling time and greenhouse gas emissions.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: ICT-10-2015 | Award Amount: 2.00M | Year: 2016

Powerful tools provided by ICT software and hardware have revolutionised and, many would claim, democratised publishing, broadcasting and communications. Now, the same is happening to manufacturing as tangible objects are created and designed as virtual bits which can be shared globally, but then reproduced as things which manifest themselves locally. This is the maker movement. MAKE-IT will study maker communities, both through ten different case studies and innovation action research, to enhance their use of Collective Awareness Platforms (CAPs). CAPs support maker communities and networks to innovate, design and make physical products based on peer collaboration and sharing. MAKE-IT, in which key maker platforms, technology firms and citizen communities participate, will focus on three perspectives: organisation and governance of the communities, their peer and collaborative activities and behaviour, and their economic and societal value and impact. Together, the findings will inform recommendations for the maker movement itself, and its implementation through CAPs, and be made assessable to many other CAPs uses, in areas like health, education and transport. MAKE-IT will also offer strategic advice for industry and give recommendations for national-level and European policy makers. A better understanding of how CAPs are central to the maker movement will enable more sustainable production and consumption patterns by generating awareness and by leveraging peer pressure for better lifestyles through behavioural and system change. It will also contribute directly to constructing a more circular economy by stimulating resource efficiency, re-using materials and energy, and re-designing production processes to move towards zero waste. CAPs-supported maker communities can create new types of jobs and new ways of working, both bottom-up and linking to smart industry, which are widely distributed across society both geographically and amongst the population.


Krause N.,TU Dortmund | Winter C.,TU Dortmund
Chemical Reviews | Year: 2011

Studies conducted in the field of gold-catalyzed cyclization reactions of allenes by attack of carbon or heteroatom nucleophiles are compiled. The cycloisomerization of .α- or β-hydroxyallenes can also be carried out in water with tetrachlorogold acid as catalyst and this system was utilized for the first example of a tandem lipase/gold-catalyzed transformation. An alternative catalytic system reported by Toste and coworkers that takes advantage of a chiral counterion, which was introduced into the catalyst by a silver salt. In 2004, Morita and Krause reported the first intramolecular endo-selective hydroamination of allenes. In an another study allenic hydrazones were found to undergo a gold(I)-catalyzed cycloisomerization to substituted pyrroles. Morita and Krause reported the gold-catalyzed cycloisomerization of α-thioallenes to the corresponding 2,5-dihydrothiophenes.


Niemeyer C.M.,TU Dortmund
Angewandte Chemie - International Edition | Year: 2010

conjugation with artificial nucleic acids allows proteins to be modified with a synthetically accessible, robust tag. This attachment is addressable in a highly specific manner by means of molecular recognition events, such as Watson-Crick hybridization. Such DNAprotein conjugates, with their combined properties, have a broad range of applications, such as in high-performance biomedical diagnostic assays, fundamental research on molecular recognition, and the synthesis of DNA nanostructures. This Review surveys current approaches to generate DNA-protein conjugates as well as recent advances in their applications. For example, DNA-protein conjugates have been assembled into model systems for the investigation of catalytic cascade reactions and light-harvesting devices. Such hybrid conjugates are also used for the biofunctionalization of planar surfaces for micro- and nanoarrays, and for decorating inorganic nanoparticles to enable applications in sensing, materials science, and catalysis. © 2010 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH &. Co. KGaA,.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: ERC-STG | Phase: ERC-2016-STG | Award Amount: 1.50M | Year: 2016

The Standard Model of particle physics successfully describes all known particles and their interactions. However, questions like the nature of dark matter or the hierarchy of masses and couplings of quarks and leptons remain to be understood. Hence, one searches for new phenomena that will lead to a superior theory that can explain these questions. All such theories introduce additional quantum corrections. Decay rates of processes which are strongly suppressed in the Standard Model are highly sensitive to these corrections. The LHCb experiment at CERN has recorded the worlds largest sample of beauty mesons. In the five years of this proposal, this sample will be enlarged by more than a factor of five. This sets an optimal environment for precision tests for new phenomena in strongly suppressed beauty decays. This proposal aims to discover new scalar or vector particles in precision measurements of leptonic and semi-leptonic beauty decays. These new particles are not predicted by the Standard Model of particle physics, a potential discovery would mark the most important finding in High Energy Physics of the last decades. Some existing anomalies in flavour data can be interpreted as hints for the particles searched for in this proposal. Two classes of measurements are planned within this proposal: the complete scan of purely leptonic beauty decays which include flavour changing neutral current as well as lepton flavour violating modes. Lepton flavour universality is tested in loop decays through a novel inclusive strategy. All proposed measurements will advance the worlds knowledge significantly and have a large discovery potential.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: ERC-COG | Phase: ERC-CoG-2015 | Award Amount: 1.98M | Year: 2016

In biochemical systems, combinations of specialized molecular entities are precisely arranged to give highly complex architectures. Sophisticated functionality, such as the selective chemical transformation of substrates in enzymes, emerges from the interplay of the individual components that are often grouped around a nanoscopic cavity. Control mechanisms based on the cooperative binding of signal substances regulate the enzymes action, and complicated feedback loops may apply. Since the advent of supramolecular chemistry, scientists construct artificial systems with ever increasing complexity and functionality that promise to serve as the basis for future developments in bottom-up nanotechnology with applications in medicine (drug delivery), diagnostics, catalysis, material science and molecular photonics/electronics. Self-assembly of functional entities with pre-programmed connectivities has produced an impressive line-up of nanoscopic architectures such as coordination cages that recognize and transform molecular substrates. Most of these systems are based on one sort of ligand, joined by one kind of metal ion. My group has reported a number of cages, each equipped with a unique, single function such as chirality, redox-activity, light-switching, allosteric regulation or endohedral binding sites. While all these mono-functionalized cages contribute to the progress of supramolecular architecture, nature demonstrates that the key to the most sophisticated systems lies in multi-functionalized structures. As breakthrough strategies for achieving this level of complexity with artificial systems we propose: 1) Heteroleptic coordination of ligands by a [Pd2Ligand4]-platform-specific way of steric fine-tuning 2) Biopolymer-inspired folding of a modular chain of covalently joined building blocks Combined with our recent achievements in host-guest switching, we aim at adjustable receptors, controllable molecular reaction chambers and multifunctional photo/redox systems

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