Tsuyama Central Hospital

Tsuyama, Japan

Tsuyama Central Hospital

Tsuyama, Japan
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Hiraoka S.,Okayama University of Science | Kato J.,Okayama University of Science | Fujiki S.,Tsuyama Central Hospital | Kaji E.,Okayama University of Science | And 9 more authors.
Gastroenterology | Year: 2010

Background & Aims: There is evidence that serrated polyps (serrated adenomas and hyperplastic polyps) have different malignant potential than traditional adenomas. We used a colonoscopy database to determine the association between the presence of serrated colorectal polyps and colorectal neoplasia. Methods: We performed a multicenter observational study of 10,199 subjects who underwent first-time colonoscopies. Data collected on study subjects included age and sex and the location, size, and histology of polyps or tumors found at colonoscopy. Serrated polyps were defined as those diagnosed by the pathologists in the participating hospitals as a serrated lesion (a lesion given the term of "classical hyperplastic polyp," "traditional serrated adenoma," "sessile serrated adenoma," or "mixed serrated polyp"). Large serrated polyps (LSPs) were defined as those ≥ 10 mm. Results: There were 1573 patients (15.4%) with advanced neoplasia, 708 patients (6.9%) with colorectal cancer (CRC), and 140 patients (1.4%) with LSPs in our cohort. Multivariate analysis associated the presence of LSPs with advanced neoplasia (odds ratio [OR], 4.01; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.83-5.69) and CRC (OR, 3.34; 95% CI, 2.16-5.03). The presence of LSPs was the greatest risk factor for CRC, particularly for proximal CRC (OR, 4.79; 95% CI, 2.54-8.42). Proximal and protruded LSPs were the highest risk factors for proximal CRC (OR, 5.36; 95% CI, 2.40-10.8 and OR, 9.00; 95% CI, 2.75-19.2, respectively). Conclusions: The presence of LSPs is a risk factor for CRC, particularly CRC of the proximal colon. © 2010 by the AGA Institute.


Fujiwara Y.,Okayama University | Fujiwara Y.,Tsuyama Central Hospital | Hotta K.,Okayama University | di Maio M.,Italian National Cancer Institute | And 4 more authors.
Annals of Oncology | Year: 2011

Purpose: Despite recent improvements in supportive care, treatment-related death (TRD) remains a serious problem for lung cancer patients undergoing systemic chemotherapy. However, few studies have formally assessed possible changes in the TRD rate over the past two decades. Patients and methods: We searched phase III trials to address the role of systemic treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Time trend was assessed using linear regression analysis. Results: The overall incidence of TRD was calculated from 119 trials including 263 chemotherapy arms (46 477 patients), with information about the causes of deaths available for 197 arms (75%, 30 147 patients). Cisplatin-based regimens were the most frequently investigated. The crude TRD rate in the overall cohort of 119 trials was 1.26% and has been notably consistent over the investigated time (P = 0.762). The most common cause of death was febrile neutropenia, with no significant change in its incidence over the years (P = 0.139). In contrast, deaths due to renal toxicity decreased significantly (P = 0.042), whereas deaths due to pulmonary disorder increased significantly (P = 0.007). Among the pharmacological agents investigated, docetaxel (Taxotere) and epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) were associated with relatively high rates of deaths from pulmonary disorders, but EGFR-TKIs were not associated with death from any other cause. Conclusions: Despite of potential confounders in our results, the overall TRD rate has remained low, but not negligible, in phase III trials for advanced NSCLC, over the past two decades. Notably, the incidence and pattern of TRD stratified by cause have changed considerably. © The Author 2010. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved.


Takayama H.,Tsuyama Central Hospital | Sato T.,Tsuyama Central Hospital | Ikeda F.,Okayama University of Science | Fujiki S.,Tsuyama Central Hospital
Hepatology Research | Year: 2016

Direct-acting antiviral agents (DAA) for hepatitis C virus (HCV) are not effective for hepatitis B virus (HBV), which may be suggestive of reactivation of anti-HBe hepatitis during interferon (IFN)-free DAA therapy in HBV/HCV co-infected patients with inactive HBV. A 69-year-old male patient was diagnosed with chronic hepatitis due to HBV/HCV co-infection with serum levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) of 94 U/L, HCV RNA of 4.2 log IU/mL and HBV DNA of 2.5 log copies/mL. HCV was thought to be responsible for the hepatitis activity because of low level of HBV core-related antigen (3.1 log U/mL). He was treated with combination therapy of daclatasvir and asunaprevir. Serum ALT gradually increased, and reached 237 U/L on day 43 in spite of undetectable HCV RNA. Serum HBV DNA was increasing to 7.0 log copies/mL at that time. The treatment was stopped due to suspicion of drug-induced liver injury and/or HBV reactivation. Administration of entecavir reduced HBV DNA levels, followed by improvement in ALT levels. This report proposes that close monitoring of HBV DNA during the anti-HCV DAA therapy and the commencement of anti-HBV therapy with nucleoside analogs after the increase of HBV DNA should be considered in patients with HBV/HCV co-infection. © 2016 The Japan Society of Hepatology.


Hagiya H.,Okayama University of Science | Hagiya H.,Tsuyama Central Hospital | Matsumoto M.,Tsuyama Central Hospital | Furukawa H.,Tsuyama Central Hospital | And 2 more authors.
Annals of Vascular Surgery | Year: 2014

Campylobacter spp. usually cause gastrointestinal infections, but among them, Campylobacter fetus is a well-known organism causing mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm (MAAA), which requires proper surgical intervention and antibiotic therapy. We report a 65-year-old man who was successfully treated by an in situ operation using a rifampicin (RFP)-bonded J-Graft for C. fetus-induced MAAA. We performed a review of the English literature on MAAA caused by C. fetus and summarized the results of the cases (28 cases). All but 2 of the patients (92.9%) were men. Blood culture and arterial wall culture were positive in 63% and 73.1% of the cases, respectively. Aneurysm rupture was seen in half of the patients, and approximately half of those patients died. Among the 18 patients who underwent in situ graft replacement, only 1 patient (5.6%) died after surgery. Antibiotic therapy was performed for more than 1 month in most cases, and overall mortality rate was 25.9% (7 of 27 cases, 3 deaths before the operation and 4 deaths after surgery). Although extra-Anatomic bypass has been conventionally performed after complete resection of an MAAA, the utility of in situ surgery has generally been recognized. Our review suggests that the in situ operation can be a choice also in cases of C. fetus-Associated MAAA. Furthermore, our case suggested the clinical utility of a newly manufactured prosthetic graft, J-Graft, for such surgical treatment. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.


Hirohata A.,Sakakibara Heart Institute of Okayama | Yamamoto K.,Sakakibara Heart Institute of Okayama | Miyoshi T.,Okayama University of Science | Hatanaka K.,Okayama University of Science | And 14 more authors.
Journal of the American College of Cardiology | Year: 2010

Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of olmesartan on progression of coronary atherosclerosis. Background: Prior intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) trial results suggest slowing of coronary atheroma progression with some medicines but have not shown convincing evidence of regression with angiotension-II receptor blocking agents. Methods: A prospective, randomized, multicenter trial-OLIVUS (Impact of OLmesartan on progression of coronary atherosclerosis: evaluation by IntraVascular UltraSound)-was performed in 247 stable angina pectoris patients with native coronary artery disease. When these patients underwent percutaneous coronary intervention for culprit lesions, IVUS was performed in their nonculprit vessels (without angiographically documented coronary stenosis [<50%]). Patients were randomly assigned to receive 10 to 40 mg of olmesartan or control and treated with a combination of beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, diuretics, nitrates, glycemic control agents, and/or statins per physician's guidance. Serial IVUS examinations (baseline and 14-month follow-up) were performed to assess coronary atheroma volume. Volumetric IVUS analyses included lumen, plaque, vessel volume, percent atheroma volume (PAV), percent change in total atheroma volume (TAV) and PAV. Results: Patient characteristics and blood pressure control were identical between the 2 groups. However, follow-up IVUS showed significantly decreased TAV and percent change in PAV in the olmesartan group (5.4% vs. 0.6 % for TAV and 3.1% vs. -0.7% for percent change in PAV, control vs. olmesartan, p < 0.05 for all). Conclusions: These observations suggest a positive role in a potentially lower rate of coronary atheroma progression through the administration of olmesartan, an angiotension-II receptor blocking agent, for patients with stable angina pectoris. © 2010 American College of Cardiology Foundation.


Takeda Y.,Okayama University | Hashimoto H.,Daiken Medical Co. | Fumoto K.,Hirosaki University | Danura T.,Okayama University | And 7 more authors.
Anesthesiology | Year: 2012

Background: Pharyngeal cooling decreases brain temperature by cooling carotid arteries. This study was designed to evaluate the principle of pharyngeal cooling in monkeys and humans. Methods: Monkeys (n = 10) were resuscitated following 12 min of cardiac arrest. Pharyngeal cooling (n = 5), in which cold saline (5°C) was perfused into the cuff at the rate of 500 ml/min, was initiated simultaneously with the onset of resuscitation for 30 min. Patients (n = 3) who were in an intensive care unit were subjected to 30 min of pharyngeal cooling under propofol anesthesia. Results: In the animal study, core brain temperature was significantly decreased compared with that in the control group by 1.9°C (SD = 0.8, P < 0.001) and 3.1°C (SD = 1.0, P < 0.001) at 10 min and 30 min after the onset of cooling, respectively. The cooling effect was more evident in an animal with low postresuscitation blood pressure. Total dose of epinephrine, number of direct current shocks, and recovery of blood pressure were not different between the two groups. The pharyngeal epithelium was microscopically intact on day 5. In the clinical study, insertion of the cuff and start of perfusion did not affect heart rate or blood pressure. Tympanic temperature was decreased by 0.6 ± 0.1°C/30 min without affecting bladder temperature. The pharynx was macroscopically intact for 3 days. Conclusions: Pharyngeal cooling rapidly and selectively decreased brain temperature in primates and tympanic temperature in humans and did not have adverse effects on return of spontaneous circulation, even when initiated during cardiac arrest in primates. © 2012 the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.


Hagiya H.,Okayama University of Science | Kimura M.,Tsuyama Central Hospital | Miyamoto T.,Tsuyama Central Hospital | Otsuka F.,Okayama University of Science
Virology Journal | Year: 2013

Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) usually causes localized zoster in adults. However, in immunocompromised patients, it can cause systemic infection accompanied by complications such as pneumonia, encephalitis, and hepatitis. Although most of critically ill patients in intensive care unit (ICU) are immunologically compromised, they are usually not considered to be at risk for systemic VZV infection.We report two cases of systemic VZV infection occurring in critically ill patients in an ICU. One patient was a 69-year-old man with Streptococcus pneumoniae-induced purpurafulminans, and the other was a 75-year-old woman with severe acute pancreatitis. During the clinical course in the ICU, characteristic vesicles with umbilical fossa appeared diffusely and bilaterally on their face, trunk, and extremities. VZV-specific IgG levels were confirmed to be elevated compared to that of the pre-onset, and a diagnosis of recurrent VZV infection was made in both patients. The patients were treated at the same ICU but did not coincide with each other; therefore a cross-infection was unlikely. They were treated with intravenous acyclovir, but the latter patient eventually died of respiratory failure.VZV infection can cause a number of serious complications, and can lead to death in some patients. Early detection and proper treatment are needed to prevent the infection from spreading out and save the patients. It might be necessary to consider antiviral prophylaxis against VZV infection for a part of critically ill patients in ICU, although the effectiveness of this approach is yet to be established. © 2013 Hagiya et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


PubMed | Okayama University of Science and Tsuyama Central Hospital
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Hepatology research : the official journal of the Japan Society of Hepatology | Year: 2016

Direct-acting antiviral agents (DAA) for hepatitis C virus (HCV) are not effective for hepatitis B virus (HBV), which may be suggestive of reactivation of anti-HBe hepatitis during interferon (IFN)-free DAA therapy in HBV/HCV co-infected patients with inactive HBV. A 69-year-old male patient was diagnosed with chronic hepatitis due to HBV/HCV co-infection with serum levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) of 94U/L, HCV RNA of 4.2logIU/mL and HBV DNA of 2.5logcopies/mL. HCV was thought to be responsible for the hepatitis activity because of low level of HBV core-related antigen (3.1logU/mL). He was treated with combination therapy of daclatasvir and asunaprevir. Serum ALT gradually increased, and reached 237U/L on day 43 in spite of undetectable HCV RNA. Serum HBV DNA was increasing to 7.0logcopies/mL at that time. The treatment was stopped due to suspicion of drug-induced liver injury and/or HBV reactivation. Administration of entecavir reduced HBV DNA levels, followed by improvement in ALT levels. This report proposes that close monitoring of HBV DNA during the anti-HCV DAA therapy and the commencement of anti-HBV therapy with nucleoside analogs after the increase of HBV DNA should be considered in patients with HBV/HCV co-infection.


We herein report the case of an 85-year-old woman presenting with right internal jugular vein candidal thrombophlebitis associated with central venous catheters (CTCVC). The infecting agent was Candida albicans, which caused recurrent candidemia five times in total. Micafungin (MCFG) alone was ineffective; however, the combination of MCFG with fosfluconazole (F-FLCZ) successfully treated the patient without a need for any anticoagulant or surgical therapies. To the extent of our knowledge, this is the first report of CTCVC being successfully treated with a combination of F-FLCZ and MCFG. These new antifungal agents have better efficacy, tolerability and bioavailability; therefore, they can be useful alternatives to classical combination therapies such as amphotericin-B and 5-fluorocytosine. © 2013 The Japanese Society of Internal Medicine.


Hagiya H.,Tsuyama Central Hospital | Ohnishi K.,Kochi University | Maki M.,Tsuyama Central Hospital | Watanabe N.,Tsuyama Central Hospital | Murasec T.,Tsuyama Central Hospital
Journal of Clinical Microbiology | Year: 2013

The clinical picture of Ochrobactrum anthropi infection is not well described because the infection is rare in humans and identification of the pathogen is difficult. We present a case of O. anthropi bacteremia that was initially misidentified as Ralstonia paucula and later identified by 16S rRNA sequencing and recA analysis. Copyright © 2013.

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