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News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

"We're excited to offer the best of both worlds in one app for the first time -- our great markets news and analysis combined with our valuable premium investment tools," said Chief Executive Officer David Callaway. "Users can default to their preferred view and all of our award-winning content works together. We look forward to working with Apple to bring this unique experience to both financial news junkies and our loyal subscribers." About TheStreet, Inc. TheStreet, Inc. (NASDAQ: TST, www.t.st) is a leading financial news and information provider to investors and institutions worldwide. The Company's namesake brand, TheStreet (www.thestreet.com), is celebrating its 20th year of producing unbiased business news and market analysis for individual investors. The Company's portfolio of institutional brands includes The Deal (www.thedeal.com), which provides actionable, intraday coverage of mergers, acquisitions and all other changes in corporate control; BoardEx (www.boardex.com), a relationship mapping service of corporate directors and officers; and RateWatch (www.rate-watch.com), which supplies rate and fee data from banks and credit unions across the U.S. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/thestreet-partners-with-apple-to-launch-a-new-mobile-app-300458455.html


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

While sports fans continue to support their favorite teams by attending their games, they rarely do so without having food and beverages as part of the celebration. In fact, the ever popular tailgate party can be more fun than the game itself. That’s exactly why an inventor from Casa Grande, Ariz., came up with an easy way to guarantee the success of the tailgate party. She developed ULTIMATE TAILGATOR to allow user to prepare foods for an outdoor venue like a picnic, concert or sporting event in advance. She designed it to also keep perishable and nonperishable foods separated. What’s more, it provides multiple compartments for storing ice, food and beverages while keeping foods sanitary and protecting them against spoilage. Of special note is a unique feature of this cooler that enables the user to grill as well as store food. This invention is also lightweight, portable and easy to transport. In addition, it is convenient, effective and affordably priced. The inventor’s personal experience inspired the idea. “While I enjoy picnics and tailgate parties, these outdoor venues require advance planning and preparation of food, drinks and supplies that have to be carried there,” she said. “I wanted to find an easy way to transport everything in one cooler.” The original design was submitted to the Woodbridge office of InventHelp. It is currently available for licensing or sale to manufacturers or marketers. For more information, write Dept. 15-TST-272, InventHelp, 217 Ninth Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15222, or call (412) 288-1300 ext. 1368. Learn more about InventHelp's Invention Submission Services at http://www.InventHelp.com - https://www.youtube.com/user/inventhelp # # #


BoardEx also recently introduced a Private Equity Module to surface key information about the senior management of PE firms and their portfolio companies. This feature enables users to map the connections that exist in the Private Equity sector and provide client firms with greater connectivity to the PE market.  The Private Equity Module allows transparency into the growing PE market, in addition to all public companies that BoardEx specializes in. "TheStreet has upgraded BoardEx to include connections within both the dealmaking and investment communities," said Jeff Davis, President of Institutional Services. "This type of data will be particularly useful to law firms and investment banks as they strive for more transparency around deal relationships." BoardEx is the most comprehensive, continuously-growing influencer database, globally. Within the platform, users can surface more than 800 million first degree connections between themselves, their colleagues and the industry's most extensive coverage of senior leaders – c-suite, board members, high level management and decision makers. The data is monitored daily, with millions of updates each year to employment, achievement, education and membership status. For more information about BoardEx, visit boardex.com. About TheStreet, Inc. TheStreet, Inc. (NASDAQ: TST, www.t.st) is a leading financial news and information provider to investors and institutions worldwide. The Company's namesake brand, TheStreet (www.thestreet.com), is celebrating its 20th year of producing unbiased business news and market analysis for individual investors. The Company's portfolio of institutional brands includes The Deal (www.thedeal.com), which provides actionable, intraday coverage of mergers, acquisitions and all other changes in corporate control; BoardEx (www.boardex.com), a relationship mapping service of corporate directors and officers; and RateWatch (www.rate-watch.com), which supplies rate and fee data from banks and credit unions across the U.S. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/boardex-expands-data-set-to-include-ma-advisor-to-advisor-connections-and-a-new-private-equity-module-300451457.html


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Sometimes it can be difficult to get a baby to calm down or keep him or her occupied, so an inventor from Tucson, Ariz., decided to think of a way to solve these problems. Eventually he came up with the patent-pending BABY GO ROUND. This improved baby chair provides a way to make a baby more comfortable and calm. It entertains and soothes the baby, which also makes life easier for parents and guardians. Overall, it promotes peace and enjoyment. Versatile and easy to use, the BABY GO ROUND serves as an alternative to conventional baby chair, and it's ideal for parents and guardians of babies, as well as daycare centers. The original design was submitted to the Tucson office of InventHelp. It is currently available for licensing or sale to manufacturers or marketers. For more information, write Dept. 16-TST-305, InventHelp, 217 Ninth Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15222, or call (412) 288-1300 ext. 1368. Learn more about InventHelp's Invention Submission Services at http://www.InventHelp.com - https://www.youtube.com/user/inventhelp # # #


News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: www.nature.com

TCR transgenic mice (B6.Cg-Tg(TcraY1,TcrbY1)416Tev/J)12, Cre-ERT2 (B6.129-Gt(ROSA)26Sortm1(cre/ERT2)Tyj/J), Alb-Cre (B6.Cg-Tg(Alb-cre)21Mgn/J), TCR-OT1 (C57BL/6-Tg(TcraTcrb)1100Mjb/J), Ly5.1 (B6.SJL-Ptprca Pepcb/BoyJ), and C57BL/6J Thy1.1 mice were purchased from The Jackson Laboratory. TCR mice were crossed to Thy.1.1 mice to generate TCR Thy.1.1 mice. TCR-OT1 were crossed to Ly5.1 mice to generate TCR-OT1 Ly5.1 mice. AST (Albumin-floxStop-SV40 large T antigen (TAG))33 were crossed to Cre-ERT2 or Alb-Cre mice to obtain AST-Cre-ERT2 and AST-Alb-Cre mice, respectively6. Both female and male mice were used for studies. Mice were age- and sex-matched and between 1.5–3 months old when used for experiments. Animals were assigned randomly to experimental groups. All mice were bred and maintained in the animal facility at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC). Experiments were performed in compliance with the MSKCC Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) regulations. Fluorochrome-conjugated antibodies were purchased from BD Biosciences, eBioscience, Biolegend, and Cell Signaling Technology. Tamoxifen (Sigma) stock solution was prepared by warming tamoxifen in 1 ml sterile corn oil at 50 °C for 15 min, then further diluted in corn oil to obtain the stock concentration (5 mg ml−1 in corn oil). A single dose of tamoxifen (1 mg) was administered intraperitoneally (i.p.) into AST-Cre-ERT2 mice. Intracellular cytokine staining was performed using the Cytofix/Cytoperm Plus kit (BD Biosciences) per the manufacturer’s instructions. In brief, T cells were mixed with 2 × 106 congenically marked splenocytes and incubated with Tag-I peptide (0.5 μg ml−1) or OVA peptide (0.1 μg ml−1) for 4–5 h at 37 °C in the presence of GolgiPlug (brefeldin A). After staining for cell-surface molecules, the cells were fixed, permeabilized, and stained with antibodies against IFNγ (XMG1.2) and TNFα (MP6-XT22). Flow cytometric analysis was performed using Fortessa and LSR FACS analysers (BD Biosciences); cells were sorted using BD FACS Aria (BD Biosciences) at the MSKCC Flow Core Facility. Flow data were analysed with FlowJo v. 10 software (Tree Star Inc.). The Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) ΔactA ΔinlB strain13 expressing the Tag-I epitope (SAINNYAQKL, SV40 large T antigen ) was generated by Aduro Biotech as previously described34. Experimental vaccination stocks were prepared by growing bacteria to early stationary phase, washing in phosphate buffered saline, formulated at approximately 1 × 1010 colony-forming units (c.f.u.) ml−1, and stored at −80 °C. Mice were infected i.p. with 5 × 106 c.f.u. of LmTAG. For the generation of effector and memory TCR CD8+ T cells, 105 CD8+ splenocytes from TCR Thy1.1 transgenic mice were adoptively transferred into B6 (Thy1.2) mice; one day later, mice were infected with 5 × 106 c.f.u. LmTAG. Effector TCR CD8+ T cells were isolated from the spleens of B6 host mice and analysed 5 or 7 days after LmTAG immunization; memory TCR CD8+ T cells were isolated from spleens of B6 host mice and analysed at least 2–3 months after LmTAG immunization. For the transfer of naive TCR T cells into AST-Cre-ERT2 mice, 1 × 105 to 2.5 × 106 CD8+ splenocytes from TCR Thy1.1 transgenic mice were adoptively transferred into AST-Cre-ERT2 mice; 1 day later, mice were treated with 1 mg tamoxifen and donor T cells isolated for subsequent analyses. For memory TCR transfer experiments (3–4) × 104 TCR Thy1.1+CD44hiCD62Lhi sorted central memory CD8 T cells were adoptively transferred into AST-Alb-Cre mice; one day later, mice were infected with 5 × 106 c.f.u. LmTAG (105 central memory T cells were sorted and transferred for experiments without subsequent listeria immunization). 5 × 105 to 1 × 106 B16 tumour cells expressing OVA (full-length or cytosolic as previously described35) were injected into C57BL/6J wild-type mice. Once tumours were established (1–2 weeks later) naive Ly5.1 congenically marked TCR CD8 T cells were adoptively transferred and isolated from tumours at indicated time points. Tumour volumes did not exceed the permitted volumes specified by the MSKCC IACUC protocol. The B16 cell line was obtained from ATCC. It was tested negative for all rodent pathogens including Mycoplasma pulmonis. Spleens were mechanically disrupted with the back of a 3-ml syringe, filtered through a 70-μm strainer, and red blood cells were lysed with ammonium chloride potassium buffer. Cells were washed twice with cold RPMI 1640 media supplemented with 2 μM glutamine, 100 U ml−1 penicillin/streptomycin, and 5–10% FCS (cRPMI). Liver tissue was mechanically disrupted to a single-cell suspension using a 150 μ metal mesh and glass pestle in ice-cold 3% FCS/HBSS and passed through a 70-μm strainer. The liver homogenate was spun down at 400g for 5 min at 4 °C, and the pellet was resuspended in 30 ml 3% FCS/HBSS, 500 μl (500 U) heparin, and 17 ml Percoll (GE), mixed by inversion, and spun at 500g for 10 min at 4 °C. Pellet was lysed with ammonium chloride potassium buffer and cells were further processed for downstream applications. TCR or TCR cells were isolated from tumours at various time points after transfer and cultured in vitro in the presence of IL-15 (100 ng ml−1) in cRPMI for 3–4 days. Naive TCR (Thy1.1+) cells were transferred into AST-Cre-ERT2 (Thy1.2+) mice which were treated with tamoxifen one day later. On days 2–9, mice were treated with the calcineurin inhibitor FK506 (Prograf, 5 mg ml−1) (2.5 mg per kg per mouse i.p. once daily) alone, or in combination with the GSK3β inhibitor TWS119 (Sigma; 0.75 mg per mouse i.p. once daily; days 5–8). Control mice were treated with PBS and/or DMSO. Human tumour samples and healthy donor peripheral blood lymphocytes were obtained as per protocols approved by the MSKCC Institutional Review Board (IRB), and all patient and healthy donors provided informed consent. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were flow-sorted for naive, effector memory-like and central memory-like phenotypes as described in Extended Data Fig. 10a. Human melanoma and lung tumours were mechanically disrupted as described for solid tumours in mice, and CD45RO+PDhiCD8+ T cells were flow-sorted for subsequent ATAC-seq analysis. Statistical analyses on flow cytometric data were performed using unpaired two-tailed Student’s t tests (Prism 6.0, GraphPad Software). A P value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Mouse samples: replicate samples were isolated from spleens or livers and sorted as follows. (i) Naive TCR Thy1.1+ T cells were sorted by flow cytometry (CD8+CD44lo) from spleens of TCR Thy1.1 transgenic mice. (ii) Day 5 and day 7 effector, and memory TCR Thy1.1+ T cells were sorted by flow cytometry (CD8+Thy1.1+) from spleens of infected B6 (Thy1.2) host mice (see above) 5 and 7 days or 2–3 months after listeria infection. (iii) TCR Thy1.1+ T cells from pre/early malignant liver lesions: naive TCR Thy1.1+ T cells were adoptively transferred into AST-Cre-ERT2 mice. 1 day later, mice were given 1 mg tamoxifen i.p. At given time points after tamoxifen treatment, T cells were isolated and sorted (CD8+Thy1.1+) from livers as described above. (iv) TCR Thy1.1+ memory T cells from established hepatocellular carcinomas in AST-Alb-Cre mice: TCR memory T cells were isolated from tumours and flow sorted (CD8+Thy1.1+) as described above. Human samples: samples were flow-sorted as described in Extended Data Fig. 10a. After flow-sorting, all samples for downstream ATAC-seq analysis were frozen in 10% DMSO/FCS and stored at −80 °C; samples for RNA-seq were directly sorted into Trizol and frozen and stored at −80 °C. RNA from sorted cells was extracted using RNeasy mini kit (Qiagen) as per instructions provided by the manufacturer. After ribogreen quantification and quality control of Agilent BioAnalyzer, 6–15 ng of total RNA was amplified (12 cycles) using the SMART-seq V4 (Clontech) ultralow input RNA kit for sequencing. 10 ng of amplified cDNA was used to prepare Illumina hiseq libraries with the Kapa DNA library preparation chemistry (Kapa Biosystems) using 8 cycles of PCR. Samples were barcoded and run on a Hiseq 2500 1T in a 50 bp/50 bp Paired end run, using the TruSeq SBS Kit v3 (Illumina). An average of 51 million paired reads were generated per sample and the percent of mRNA bases was 62.5% on average. Chromatin profiling was performed by ATAC-seq as described previously11. In brief, 12,000 to 50,000 cells were washed in cold PBS and lysed. Transposition was performed at 42 °C for 45 min. After purification of the DNA with the MinElute PCR purification kit (Qiagen), material was amplified for 5 cycles. Additional PCR cycles were evaluated by real time PCR. Final product was cleaned by Ampure Beads at a 1.5× ratio. Libraries were sequenced on a Hiseq 2500 1T in a 50 bp/50 bp Paired end run, using the TruSeq SBS Kit v3 (Illumina). An average of 47 × 106 paired reads was generated per sample. Raw ATAC-seq reads were trimmed and filtered for quality using Trim Galore! v0.4.0 (http://www.bioinformatics.babraham.ac.uk/projects/trim_galore/), powered by CutAdapt v1.8.1 (http://dx.doi.org/10.14806/ej.17.1.200) and FastQC v0.11.3 (http://www.bioinformatics.babraham.ac.uk/projects/fastqc/). Paired-end reads were aligned using Bowtie2 v2.2.5 (ref. 36) against either mm10 or hg38 and non-uniquely mapping reads were removed. To correct for the fact that the Tn5 transposase binds as a dimer and inserts two adapters in the Tn5 tagmentation step37, all positive-strand reads were shifted 4 bp downstream and all negative-strand reads were shifted 5 bp upstream to centre the reads on the transposon binding event11. We then pooled the shifted reads by sample type and identified peaks using MACS2 (ref. 38) with a threshold of FDR-corrected P < 1 × 10−2 using the Benjamini–Hochberg procedure for multiple hypothesis correction. As called peaks may be caused by noise in the assay and not reflect true chromatin accessibility, we calculated an irreproducible discovery rate (IDR)39 for all pairs of replicates across a cell type. The IDR is an estimate of the threshold where two ranked lists of results, in this case peak calls ranked by P value, no longer represent reproducible events. Using this measure, we excluded peaks that were not reproducible (IDR < 5 × 10−3) across at least one pair of replicates in each mouse or human cell type. Peaks found reproducibly in each mouse cell type were combined to create a genome-wide atlas of accessible chromatin regions. Reproducible peaks from different samples were merged if they overlapped by more than 75%. To create the atlas of accessible peaks for the human samples, reproducible peaks from the normal human cell types (HN, HCM, and HEM) and the tumour-derived cells (PD1hi) were combined. There was greater variation between the human TIL samples than between T cell samples from healthy donors; this led to fewer reproducible peaks being called in the TIL samples. Like the mouse atlas, peaks overlapping by more than 75% were merged in the human atlas. Numbers of called peaks and reproducible peaks for each sample type are listed in Supplementary Data. The RefSeq transcript annotations of the hg38 version of the human genome and the mm10 version of the mouse genome were used to define the genomic location of transcription units. For genes with multiple gene models, the longest transcription unit was used for the gene locus definition. ATAC peaks located in the body of the transcription unit, together with the 2-kb regions upstream of the TSS and downstream of the 3′ end, were assigned to the gene. If a peak was found in the overlap of the transcription units of two genes, one of the genes was chosen arbitrarily. Intergenic peaks were assigned to the gene with a TSS or 3′ end that was closest to the peak. In this way, each peak was unambiguously assigned to one gene. Peaks were annotated as promoter peaks if they were within 2 kb of a transcription start site. Non-promoter peaks were annotated as intergenic, intronic or exonic according to the relevant RefSeq transcript annotation. We found a total of 75,689 reproducible ATAC-seq peaks in the mouse samples. Examining genomic locations, 39.6% of the peaks were found in introns, 36.3% were found in intergenic regions, 22.1% were found in promoters and 2.1% were found in exons. In the human samples, we found a total of 42,104 reproducible ATAC-seq peaks. Among these peaks, 34.0% were found in introns, 29.9% were found in intergenic regions, 34.0% were found in promoters, and 2.0% were found in exons. Chromosome-wide genomic coverage for all (autosomal) chromosomes and all samples was examined and no systemic bias was observed. PCA plots were generated using read counts against all mouse or human atlas peaks. These read counts were processed using the variance-stabilizing transformation built into the DESeq2 package40. Reads aligning to atlas peak regions were counted using the summarizeOverlaps function of the R packages GenomicAlignments v1.2.2 and GenomicRanges v1.18.4 (ref. 41). Differential accessibility of these peaks was then calculated for all pairwise comparisons of cell types using DESeq2 v1.6.3 (ref. 40). The ATAC-seq peak heat maps were created by pooling the DESeq size-factor normalized read counts per atlas peak across replicates of ATAC-seq data and binning the region ±1 kb around the peak summit in 20 bp bins. To improve visibility, bins with read counts greater than the 75th percentile + 1.5 × IQR were capped at that value. All analysis was performed using the original uncapped read counts. Genome coverage plots were generated for each replicate of ATAC-seq and RNA-seq by calculating genome-wide coverage of aligned reads using the bedtools function genomecov42. For ATAC-seq samples, this coverage was calculated after shifting the reads to account for the Tn5-induced bias. The coverage values were then normalized using DESeq2-derived size factors and replicates were combined to create one signal track for each sample type. ATAC-seq and RNA-seq coverage plots were generated using the Integrated Genomics Viewer (Broad)43. Using the MEME44-curated CisBP45 transcription factor binding motif (TFBM) reference, we scanned the mouse ATAC-seq peak atlas with FIMO46 to find peaks likely to contain each TFBM (P < 10−4). The MEME cisBP reference for direct and inferred motifs for Mus musculus was curated by the MEME suite developers as follows: to reduce redundancy, for each transcription factor a single motif was selected according to the following precedence rules. The direct motif was chosen if there was one, otherwise the inferred motif with the highest DNA binding domain (DBD) similarity (according to CisBP) to a transcription factor in another species with a direct motif was chosen. If there was more than one direct motif or inferred motif with the highest DBD similarity, a motif was chosen according to its provenance (CisBP ‘Motif_Type’ attribute) in the following order: ChIP-seq, HocoMoco, DeBoer11, PBM, SELEX, B1H, High-throughput Selex CAGE, PBM:CSA:DIP-chip, ChIP-chip, COMPILED, DNaseI footprinting. Each motif thus determined was linked to a single transcription factor in the CisBP database, following the same precedence rules. The final reference contained 718 motifs between 6 and 30 bp in width (average width, 10.7 bp). Transcription factors with similar FIMO-predicted target peaks were combined into transcription factor families. Similarity of predicted target peak sets was measured using the Jaccard index (size of intersection/size of union). Transcription factors with Jaccard indices greater than 0.7 were combined for further analyses. Relative transcription factor accessibility was calculated using two one-sided Wilcoxon rank-sign tests comparing the distributions of peak heights for peaks containing FIMO-predicted transcription factor binding sites. Peak height was defined as the maximum observed number of reads overlapping at any point in the defined peak region. ATAC-seq footprints containing FIMO-predicted transcription factor binding sites (P < 1 × 10−4) were selected. Positive- and negative-strand ATAC-seq cut sites were counted 100 bp up- and down-stream of the centre of the motif site in each of the selected peaks. The mean number of ATAC-seq cut sites across matching atlas peaks was then plotted to generate the footprint figures. In these plots, each gene is represented by a stack of diamonds corresponding accessible chromatin regions of the same gene. The bottom-most peak in this stack corresponds to the log fold change in expression of the gene. The diamonds are coloured according to the accessibility change of their ATAC-seq peak with blue indicating closing and red indicating opening. The colour scale was based on the rank-order of the peak accessibility changes. In Extended Data Fig. 6d, the colour scale ranges from a log fold change of −3.92 to 4.96 (L14/L7). The UCSC liftOver tool47 was used to convert the mouse ATAC-seq peak atlas from mm10 coordinates to hg38 coordinates. The converted mouse atlas was then compared to the human atlas and 20,642 mouse peaks were within 100 bp of a human peak. We compared the results from the UCSC liftover tool and an alternative method, bnMapper48, and confirmed that the set of peaks mapped by bnMapper and by the UCSC liftOver tool was nearly identical (57,383 out of 75,689 by liftOver and 58,299 out of 75,689 by bnMapper). Additionally, all 57,223 peaks mapped to hg38 by both tools were mapped to the same chromosomal positions. The majority of these conserved peaks were found in promoter regions (56.4%), whereas relatively fewer were found in intergenic (22.4%), intronic (19.6%), and exonic (1.5%) regions. For non-promoter peaks conserved between human and mouse, Spearman correlations of log (FC) were calculated between human N and human EM, CM or PD1hi TIL versus log (FC) between mouse N and functional E5, E7, M and dysfunctional L5 to L60. Raw ATAC-seq reads were trimmed and filtered for quality using Trim Galore! v0.4.0 (http://www.bioinformatics.babraham.ac.uk/projects/trim_galore/), powered by CutAdapt v1.8.1 (http://dx.doi.org/10.14806/ej.17.1.200) and FastQC v0.11.3 (http://www.bioinformatics.babraham.ac.uk/projects/fastqc/). Paired-end reads were aligned using STAR49 against either mm10 or hg38. The RefSeq transcript annotations of the hg38 version of the human genome and the mm10 version of the mouse genome were used for the genomic location of transcription units. Reads aligning to annotated exon regions were counted using the summarizeOverlaps function of the R packages GenomicAlignments v1.2.2 and GenomicRanges v1.18.4 (ref. 41). Differential expression of genes across cell types was calculated using DESeq2 v1.6.3 (ref. 40). FDR correction of 0.05 was imposed unless otherwise stated. A log fold change cutoff of 1 was used in some analyses as indicated. Enrichment of gene ontology terms in sets of ATAC-seq peaks was calculated using GREAT (Genomic Regions Enrichment of Annotations Tool) using default parameters50. The full ATAC-seq atlas was used as the background set. To identify membrane proteins that distinguished early (L5–L7) from late (L14–L60) dysfunctional TST, RNA-seq data was analysed for genes contained within the gene ontology category 0016020 (membrane proteins). The top 50 most up- and downregulated genes (size-factor normalized RPKM) when compared between L5–L7 and L14–L60 were plotted in a heat map (row-normalized). Protein expression was assessed by flow cytometry for those membrane proteins for which monoclonal antibodies were available. Mouse targets (clone; supplier): CD5 (53-7.3; eBioscience), CD30L (RM153; eBioscience), CD38 (90; Biolegend), and CD101 (Moushi101; eBioscience). Human targets: CD5 (L17F12; Biolegend), CD38 (HB7; eBioscience), CD101 (BB27; Biolegend). No statistical methods were used to predetermine sample size. The investigators were not blinded to allocation during experiments and outcome assessment. Mice or human samples were excluded if donor or tumour-infiltrating CD8 T cells could not be found. All data generated and supporting the findings of this study are available within the paper. The RNA-seq and ATAC-seq data have been deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO Super-Series accession number GSE89309 (GSE89307 for RNA-seq, GSE89308 for ATAC-seq). Source Data for Figs 1 and Extended Data Figs 1, 3 and 7 are provided with the online version of the paper. Additional information and materials will be made available upon request.


Cramer will also conduct keynote interviews with Ed Garden, Chief Investment Officer & Founding Partner of Trian Fund Management, L.P., Randall J. Hogan, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Pentair, and Chief Justice Leo E. Strine, Jr., of the Delaware Supreme Court. "Serving on a board is harder than ever these days. From cybersecurity to federal regulations, pitfalls abound and lawsuits are lurking around every corner," said Chief Executive Officer David Callaway. "Our conference aims to help board members, C-suite executives and others navigate these troubled waters." For a full list of speakers, the conference agenda and to purchase tickets, please visit The Deal's Corporate Governance Conference site. The event is produced by The Deal and BoardEx, and presented in collaboration with Paul Weiss, Morgan Stanley, PWC, Kekst and Seal. For press tickets contact Jon Kostakopoulos at 212.321.5561 or jon.kostakopoulos at thestreet.com. About The Deal  The Deal (www.thedeal.com) provides actionable, intraday coverage of mergers, acquisitions and all other changes in corporate control to institutional investors, private equity, hedge funds and the firms that serve them. The Deal is a business unit of TheStreet, Inc. (NASDAQ: TST, www.t.st), a leading financial news and information provider. Other business units include TheStreet (www.thestreet.com), which is celebrating its 20th year of producing unbiased business news and market analysis; BoardEx (www.boardex.com), the leading relationship mapping service of corporate directors and officers; and RateWatch (www.rate-watch.com) which supplies rate and fee data from banks and credit unions across the U.S. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/jim-cramer-to-host-the-deals-corporate-governance-conference-cybersecurity-board-structure-activists-and-other-challenges-to-value-creation-300463012.html


News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

"We are overjoyed with the response we have received this year. Over 100 names will be presenting for the first time, and many of them will use LD Micro as their inaugural event. Since you have conferences galore each and every week, we wanted to do something distinguishing. Something that could not be easily emulated. No event this year will have the variety or the rarity of the companies in attendance, and our patrons are going to see many names that will not be making appearances anywhere else." stated Chris Lahiji, Founder of LD Micro. "One more thing," Chris stated while having a Doppio Nitro Cold Brew at his local Starbucks Reserve, "as we approach 1,000 companies that have presented at our conferences, and our 10th annual Main Event in December, our pipeline for additional enhancements to the site and future partnerships have never been stronger." After a drawn out pause, Chris continued, "LD Micro recently signed a deal with TheStreet (TST) to be the exclusive media sponsor for 2017, which will enhance our online presence. We will maintain an intimate setting at the conference, while allowing the entire world to have access to the information they desire. The 'Woodstock of Micro-Cap' will stay true to its roots, regardless of market conditions. We want to thank our loyal sponsors, companies, and patrons for giving us the capability of remaining independent and making the important decisions that benefit everyone in the micro-cap space." For more details, please visit http://www.ldmicro.com for a complete list of the companies scheduled to present. If you are a company that wishes to attend, please contact David Scher at david@ldmicro.com If you are a private or institutional investor interested in learning more about the conference, please contact Chris Lahiji at Chris@ldmicro.com Please send all modeling requests to Eric Lahiji at Eric@ldmicro.com LD Micro was founded in 2006 with the sole purpose of being an independent resource in the microcap space. What started out as a newsletter highlighting unique companies has transformed into an event platform hosting several influential conferences annually (Invitational, Summit, and Main Event). In 2015, LDM launched the first pure microcap index (the LDMi) to exclusively provide intraday information on the entire sector. LD will continue to provide valuable tools for the benefit of everyone in the small and microcap universe. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/ld-micro-to-host-7th-annual-micro-cap-invitational-june-6th-and-7th-300454535.html


News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

"We are honored and thrilled to have one of the most prominent and respected firms in the financial space partner with us. TheStreet has been a loyal supporter of ours since inception. Back in 2009, one of their writers had the vision to call our conference 'The Woodstock of Micro-cap,' which still holds true to this day," stated Chris Lahiji, President of LD Micro. "With TheStreet serving as our exclusive media partner, it is our belief that even more people throughout the world will have access to the most unique names in micro-cap. The best is truly yet to come..." David Callaway, CEO of TheStreet, Inc. said, "LD Micro hosts some of the pre-eminent conferences for microcap businesses. We are excited to be associated with the events as well as to share news about the opportunities and influencers within the space with our audience of active investors." This year marks the 10th anniversary of LD Micro hosting events. For more information please visit ldmicro.com/events TheStreet, Inc. (NASDAQ: TST, www.t.st) is a leading financial news and information provider to investors and institutions worldwide. The Company's flagship brand, TheStreet (www.thestreet.com), is celebrating its 20th year of producing unbiased business news and market analysis for individual investors. The Company's portfolio of institutional brands includes The Deal (www.thedeal.com), which provides actionable, intraday coverage of mergers, acquisitions and all other changes in corporate control; BoardEx (www.boardex.com), a relationship mapping service of corporate directors and officers; and RateWatch (www.rate-watch.com), which supplies rate and fee data from banks and credit unions across the U.S. LD Micro was founded in 2006 with the sole purpose of being an independent resource in the microcap space. What started out as a newsletter highlighting unique companies has transformed into an event platform hosting several influential conferences annually (Invitational, Summit, and Main Event). In 2015, LDM launched the first pure microcap index (the LDMi) to exclusively provide intraday information on the entire sector. LD will continue to provide valuable tools for the benefit of everyone in the small and microcap universe. It is a non-registered investment advisor. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/ld-micro-and-thestreet-inc-announce-exclusive-media-partnership-300453471.html


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

NEW YORK, May 11, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- 2017's first quarter was grim for retailers, as bankruptcy filings continued to escalate, with no sign of decreasing in the foreseeable future, proving the "Amazon Effect" is not a fluke. Energy industry filings are expected to continue in the second quarter, although at a slower pace this year, and the healthcare industry may be the next sector to face a flurry of bankruptcy filings, according to The Deal, a business unit of TheStreet, Inc. (NASDAQ: TST). "Bankruptcy and restructuring attorneys and advisers were busy in the first quarter as the amount of Chapter 11 filings increased in each month with the retail industry leading the charge on petitions," said Kirk O'Neil, bankruptcy reporter at The Deal. "The rising trend of retail Chapter 11 filings is expected to continue through the year as oil and gas industry filings begin to level off."


"The new platform makes it easy to find all the information you need and is mobile-optimized so it works equally well on your phone or tablet – including video, which you can now access on any mobile device," said Cramer, TheStreet's founder. "We are proud to offer new features like a white-papers section, a dedicated video tab, and price targets on the portfolio page." New Income Seeker Product Separately, TheStreet unveiled Income Seeker, a new subscription-based investing tool that educates users on how to make money on bonds, dividend-paying stocks, CDs and other income-oriented investments. Income Seeker will give subscribers sophisticated information, analysis and recommendations in order to maximize their fixed-income investments. "Amid this aging bull and in a rising-interest-rate environment, income investors need the best opportunities in dividend stocks, dividend-focused mutual funds and ETFs, REITs, munis, Treasuries and other investments with a margin of safety," said Margaret de Luna, TheStreet.com's president. "Income Seeker provides practical, actionable information for them." For more information about Action Alerts PLUS, visit aap.thestreet.com. For more information about Income Seeker, click here. About TheStreet, Inc. TheStreet, Inc. (NASDAQ: TST, www.t.st) is a leading financial news and information provider to investors and institutions worldwide. The Company's namesake brand, TheStreet (www.thestreet.com), is celebrating its 20th year of producing unbiased business news and market analysis for individual investors. The Company's portfolio of institutional brands includes The Deal (www.thedeal.com), which provides actionable, intraday coverage of mergers, acquisitions and all other changes in corporate control; BoardEx (www.boardex.com), a relationship mapping service of corporate directors and officers; and RateWatch (www.rate-watch.com), which supplies rate and fee data from banks and credit unions across the U.S. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/thestreet-redesigns-jim-cramers-action-alerts-plus-club-and-debuts-income-seeker-product-300453461.html

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