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News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

LA JOLLA, CA - May 9, 2017 - Three chemists from The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI)--Dale Boger, Jin-Quan Yu and Phil Baran--have received awards from the Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC), a renowned professional organization for chemists based in the United Kingdom, with more than 54,000 members worldwide. Dale Boger, co-chair of the Department of Chemistry at TSRI, was awarded the 2017 Robert Robinson Award of the RSC's Organic Division. The award honors his groundbreaking studies in natural product synthesis, which could lead to new therapeutic treatments for challenging clinical needs. "I am very honored and humbled to receive the RSC Robert Robinson Award, which has such a distinguished list of prior award winners," Boger said. Jin-Quan Yu, Frank and Bertha Hupp Professor of Chemistry at TSRI, received the 2017 Pedler Award from the RSC's Organic Division in recognition of his development of pioneering methods of C-H activation, a technique in chemistry that can lead to new pharmaceuticals and other natural products. "I hope these new reactions will accelerate the discovery and synthesis of useful molecules, especially medicines," said Yu, who received his Ph.D. in the U.K. at the University of Cambridge and served as a Royal Society fellow. "It gives me a warm feeling to be recognized by the U.K. scientific community that I was part of for 10 years." Phil Baran, the Darlene Shiley Professor of Chemistry at TSRI, received the RSC's 2017 Merck, Sharp & Dohme Award, which honors contributions to any area of organic chemistry from a researcher under the age of 45. Baran's work focuses on developing new chemical reactions and methodologies for more efficient and economically viable routes in drug design. Baran credited his lab members for his success so far. "This award is a recognition of the students and postdoctoral scholars who work tirelessly to invent useful chemistry," Baran said. In addition to £2,000 and a medal, all three awards include a lecture tour in the U.K. The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) is one of the world's largest independent, not-for-profit organizations focusing on research in the biomedical sciences. TSRI is internationally recognized for its contributions to science and health, including its role in laying the foundation for new treatments for cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, hemophilia, and other diseases. An institution that evolved from the Scripps Metabolic Clinic founded by philanthropist Ellen Browning Scripps in 1924, the institute now employs more than 2,500 people on its campuses in La Jolla, CA, and Jupiter, FL, where its renowned scientists -- including two Nobel laureates and 20 members of the National Academies of Science, Engineering or Medicine -- work toward their next discoveries. The institute's graduate program, which awards PhD degrees in biology and chemistry, ranks among the top ten of its kind in the nation. In October 2016, TSRI announced a strategic affiliation with the California Institute for Biomedical Research (Calibr), representing a renewed commitment to the discovery and development of new medicines to address unmet medical needs. For more information, see http://www. .


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

LA JOLLA, CA - May 11, 2017 - In their quest to replicate themselves, viruses have gotten awfully good at tricking human cells into pumping out viral proteins. That's why scientists have been working to use viruses as forces for good: to deliver useful genes to human cells and help patients who lack important proteins or enzymes. A team of researchers led by Associate Professor Vijay Reddy at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) has now uncovered the structural details that make one virus a better tool for future therapies than its closely related "cousin." As Reddy and his colleagues reported this week in the journal Science Advances, the structure of a less prevalent species D adenovirus may work well as a gene-delivery vector because its structure doesn't let it get spirited away to the liver, minimizing liver toxicity. The Reddy Lab's study is the first to show the structural details on species D's surface that set it apart from another common subtype of adenovirus, called species C, which does travel to the liver. "Greater understanding of the structures of adenoviruses from different species will help generate better gene therapies and/or vaccine vectors," said Reddy. Using an imaging technique called cryo-electron microscopy, the researchers discovered that while these two species of adenoviruses share the same shell-like core, they have different surface structures, which Reddy called "decorations" or "loops." These loops are key to a virus's behavior. They determine which receptors on human cells the virus can bind to. For species C adenoviruses, specific loops help the virus attach to blood coagulation factors (adaptor proteins) and get targeted to the human liver. Species D adenoviruses display distinctly different loop decorations. For use in gene and vaccine therapies, the virus would deliver helpful genes instead. Plus, species D has one more important advantage over species C: Humans are constantly exposed to species C adenoviruses, so most people have developed antibodies to fight them off. These same antibodies would fight off the species C viruses even if they were designed for beneficial therapies. On the flip side, many of the species D adenoviruses are rare, and it's unlikely that a patient would have antibodies to fight them off. That makes species D viruses better for delivering therapies. In fact, Reddy said scientists are already testing ways to use it to generate malaria and Ebola virus vaccines. The researchers next plan to look at members of the other five species of adenoviruses to see if they would have useful traits as viral therapy vectors. In addition to Reddy, the first authors of the study, "Cryo-EM structure of human adenovirus D26 reveals the conservation of structural organization among human adenoviruses," were Xiaodi Yu and David Veesler, formerly at TSRI, now at Pfizer Worldwide R&D, and the University of Washington, Seattle, respectively. Additional authors were Melody Campbell, formerly at TSRI, now at the University of California, San Francisco; Mary E. Barry and Michael A. Barry of the Mayo Clinic; and Francisco Asturias of TSRI. Reddy also thanked Bridget Carragher and Clint Potter, directors of the National Resource for Automated Molecular Microscopy (NRAMM) facility for their support and collaboration. The study was supported by the National Institutes of Health (grants R01AI070771, R21AI103692 and GM103310). The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) is one of the world's largest independent, not-for-profit organizations focusing on research in the biomedical sciences. TSRI is internationally recognized for its contributions to science and health, including its role in laying the foundation for new treatments for cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, hemophilia, and other diseases. An institution that evolved from the Scripps Metabolic Clinic founded by philanthropist Ellen Browning Scripps in 1924, the institute now employs more than 2,500 people on its campuses in La Jolla, CA, and Jupiter, FL, where its renowned scientists--including two Nobel laureates and 20 members of the National Academies of Science, Engineering or Medicine--work toward their next discoveries. The institute's graduate program, which awards PhD degrees in biology and chemistry, ranks among the top ten of its kind in the nation. In October 2016, TSRI announced a strategic affiliation with the California Institute for Biomedical Research (Calibr), representing a renewed commitment to the discovery and development of new medicines to address unmet medical needs. For more information, see http://www. .


A team of researchers led by Associate Professor Vijay Reddy at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) has now uncovered the structural details that make one virus a better tool for future therapies than its closely related "cousin." As Reddy and his colleagues reported this week in the journal Science Advances, the structure of a less prevalent species D adenovirus may work well as a gene-delivery vector because its structure doesn't let it get spirited away to the liver, minimizing liver toxicity. The Reddy Lab's study is the first to show the structural details on species D's surface that set it apart from another common subtype of adenovirus, called species C, which does travel to the liver. "Greater understanding of the structures of adenoviruses from different species will help generate better gene therapies and/or vaccine vectors," said Reddy. Using an imaging technique called cryo-electron microscopy, the researchers discovered that while these two species of adenoviruses share the same shell-like core, they have different surface structures, which Reddy called "decorations" or "loops." These loops are key to a virus's behavior. They determine which receptors on human cells the virus can bind to. For species C adenoviruses, specific loops help the virus attach to blood coagulation factors (adaptor proteins) and get targeted to the human liver. Species D adenoviruses display distinctly different loop decorations. For use in gene and vaccine therapies, the virus would deliver helpful genes instead. Plus, species D has one more important advantage over species C: Humans are constantly exposed to species C adenoviruses, so most people have developed antibodies to fight them off. These same antibodies would fight off the species C viruses even if they were designed for beneficial therapies. On the flip side, many of the species D adenoviruses are rare, and it's unlikely that a patient would have antibodies to fight them off. That makes species D viruses better for delivering therapies. In fact, Reddy said scientists are already testing ways to use it to generate malaria and Ebola virus vaccines. The researchers next plan to look at members of the other five species of adenoviruses to see if they would have useful traits as viral therapy vectors. Explore further: Adenoviruses may pose risk for monkey-to-human leap More information: Xiaodi Yu et al, Cryo-EM structure of human adenovirus D26 reveals the conservation of structural organization among human adenoviruses, Science Advances (2017). DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1602670


News Article | May 19, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

HAUPPAUGE, N.Y.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--TSR, Inc. (Nasdaq:TSRI) (“TSR” or the “Company”) announced today that Zeff Capital L.P. (“Zeff Capital”), a Delaware limited partnership that owns approximately 7.2% of TSR’s common stock, filed an amended Schedule 13D with the Securities and Exchange Commission on May 18, 2017. This filing reported that on May 17, 2017, Zeff Capital delivered a letter to the Company indicating, among other things, Zeff Capital’s interest, expressed on behalf of its affiliated investment funds, in acquiring all of the outstanding shares of common stock not already owned by Zeff Capital or its affiliates for $6.15 per share, in cash. In addition, Zeff Capital’s letter states that the proposed purchase price represents a premium of approximately 27% over the closing price of TSR common stock on May 17, 2017. The filing states that the proposal is conditioned upon, among other things, completion of satisfactory due diligence, completion of a financing plan, negotiation of mutually acceptable definitive agreements and the satisfaction (or waiver) of the then conditions expected to be set forth in such agreements. The Company has provided a copy of Zeff Capital’s letter to the members of its Board of Directors for review.


News Article | April 20, 2017
Site: www.rdmag.com

A team of chemists from the Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) developed a simple technique for creating a class of molecules that could yield valuable disease treatments. The researchers were able to transform abundant, inexpensive, structurally diverse carboxylic acids into boronic acids and related compounds with similar structures through a method called decarboxylative borylation. Essentially, this process entails harnessing a single reaction and cheap nickel catalysts to replace a key carbon atom with a boron atom on a carboxylic acid, according to the announcement. “Carboxylic acids are the ideal starting material for synthesizing boronic acids, but until now there hasn’t been any method for getting from one to the other,” said the principal investigator and professor of chemistry at TSRI Phil S. Baran, Ph.D., in a statement. Two experiments were performed to verify decarboxylative borylation’s efficacy. First, Baran and his team harnessed this technique to produce boronic acid versions of several commonly used drugs like vancomycin and atorvastatin (Lipitor). Next, the TSRI group worked with researchers from the California Institute for Biomedical Research (CIBR) to develop boronic-acid based compounds engineered to inhibit an enzyme known as neutrophil elastate. Immune cells release this enzyme in the lungs during infections involving lung inflammation, like chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cystic fibrosis. Results from lab-dish tests indicated the boronic acid-based compounds had stronger elastase inhibitor capabilities compared to the other compounds, by binding very tightly to target molecules in a manner that allowed eventual detachment. This factor potentially limited the impact of off-target interactions that cause unwanted side-effects. “The next step is to see how well these compounds perform in animal models,” said study co-author and CIBR’s director of medicinal chemistry Arnab Chatterjee, in a statement. “In general, this new method allows us in a practical way to get into this largely unexplored but promising chemical space of borylated compounds, and thus enables us to revisit old targets, such as elastase, that have largely resisted prior drug development efforts.” Borylated versions of drug compounds should display superior properties compared to their carboxylic acid counterparts, but previous efforts to prepare these compounds were difficult, greatly limiting their use in the pharmaceutical industry. However, Baran notes that chemists can now efficiently install boron at any stage compared to devoting 95 percent of their time trying to introduce a single boron atom. These findings were published in the journal Science.


News Article | April 20, 2017
Site: www.rdmag.com

A team of chemists from the Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) developed a simple technique for creating a class of molecules that could yield valuable disease treatments. The researchers were able to transform abundant, inexpensive, structurally diverse carboxylic acids into boronic acids and related compounds with similar structures through a method called decarboxylative borylation. Essentially, this process entails harnessing a single reaction and cheap nickel catalysts to replace a key carbon atom with a boron atom on a carboxylic acid, according to the announcement. “Carboxylic acids are the ideal starting material for synthesizing boronic acids, but until now there hasn’t been any method for getting from one to the other,” said the principal investigator and professor of chemistry at TSRI Phil S. Baran, Ph.D., in a statement. Two experiments were performed to verify decarboxylative borylation’s efficacy. First, Baran and his team harnessed this technique to produce boronic acid versions of several commonly used drugs like vancomycin and atorvastatin (Lipitor). Next, the TSRI group worked with researchers from the California Institute for Biomedical Research (CIBR) to develop boronic-acid based compounds engineered to inhibit an enzyme known as neutrophil elastate. Immune cells release this enzyme in the lungs during infections involving lung inflammation, like chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cystic fibrosis. Results from lab-dish tests indicated the boronic acid-based compounds had stronger elastase inhibitor capabilities compared to the other compounds, by binding very tightly to target molecules in a manner that allowed eventual detachment. This factor potentially limited the impact of off-target interactions that cause unwanted side-effects. “The next step is to see how well these compounds perform in animal models,” said study co-author and CIBR’s director of medicinal chemistry Arnab Chatterjee, in a statement. “In general, this new method allows us in a practical way to get into this largely unexplored but promising chemical space of borylated compounds, and thus enables us to revisit old targets, such as elastase, that have largely resisted prior drug development efforts.” Borylated versions of drug compounds should display superior properties compared to their carboxylic acid counterparts, but previous efforts to prepare these compounds were difficult, greatly limiting their use in the pharmaceutical industry. However, Baran notes that chemists can now efficiently install boron at any stage compared to devoting 95 percent of their time trying to introduce a single boron atom. These findings were published in the journal Science.


News Article | April 13, 2017
Site: www.rdmag.com

A new study led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) could help researchers develop personalized treatments for alcoholism and alcohol use disorder. The research reveals a key difference between the brains of alcohol-dependent versus nondependent rats. When given alcohol, both groups showed increased activity in a region of the brain called the central amygdala (CeA)—but this activity was due to two completely different brain signaling pathways. TSRI Professor Marisa Roberto, senior author of the new study, said the findings could help researchers develop more personalized treatments for alcohol dependence, as they evaluate how a person’s brain responds to different therapeutics. The findings were published recently online ahead of print in The Journal of Neuroscience. The new research builds on the Roberto lab’s previous discovery that alcohol increases neuronal activity in the CeA. The researchers found increased activity both nondependent, or naïve, and alcohol-dependent rats. As they investigated this phenomenon in the new study, Roberto and her colleagues were surprised to find that the mechanisms underlying this increased activity differed between the two groups. By giving naïve rats a dose of alcohol, the researchers engaged proteins called calcium channels and increased neuronal activity. Neurons fired as the specific calcium channels at play, called L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (LTCCs), boosted the release of a neurotransmitter called GABA. Blocking these LTCCs reduced voluntary alcohol consumption in naïve rats. But in alcohol-dependent rats, the researchers found decreased abundance of LTCCs on neuronal cell membranes, disrupting their normal ability to drive a dose of alcohol’s effects on CeA activity. Instead, increased neuronal activity was driven by a stress hormone called corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and its type 1 receptor (CRF1). The researchers found that blocking CeA CRF1s reduced voluntary alcohol consumption in the dependent rats. Studying these two groups shed light on how alcohol functionally alters the brain, Roberto explained. “There is a switch in the molecular mechanisms underlying the CeA’s response to alcohol (from LTCC- to CRF1-driven) as the individual transitions to the alcohol-dependent state,” she said. The cellular and molecular experiments were led by TSRI Research Associate and study first author Florence Varodayan. The behavioral tests were conducted by TSRI Research Associate Giordano de Guglielmo in the lab of TSRI Associate Professor Olivier George. Roberto hopes the findings lead to better ways to treat alcohol dependence. Alcohol use disorder appears to have many different root causes, but the new findings suggest doctors could analyze certain symptoms or genetic markers to determine which patients are likely to have CRF-CRF1 hyperactivation and benefit from the development of a novel drug that blocks that activity. In addition to Roberto, Varodayan and de Guglielmo, authors of the study, “Alcohol dependence disrupts amygdalar L-type voltage-gated calcium channel mechanisms,” were Marian Logrip and Olivier George of TSRI. The study was supported by the National Institutes of Health (grants AA015566, AA021491, AA017447, AA006420, AA013498, AA020608, AA022977 and AA021802).


News Article | April 13, 2017
Site: www.rdmag.com

A new study led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) could help researchers develop personalized treatments for alcoholism and alcohol use disorder. The research reveals a key difference between the brains of alcohol-dependent versus nondependent rats. When given alcohol, both groups showed increased activity in a region of the brain called the central amygdala (CeA)—but this activity was due to two completely different brain signaling pathways. TSRI Professor Marisa Roberto, senior author of the new study, said the findings could help researchers develop more personalized treatments for alcohol dependence, as they evaluate how a person’s brain responds to different therapeutics. The findings were published recently online ahead of print in The Journal of Neuroscience. The new research builds on the Roberto lab’s previous discovery that alcohol increases neuronal activity in the CeA. The researchers found increased activity both nondependent, or naïve, and alcohol-dependent rats. As they investigated this phenomenon in the new study, Roberto and her colleagues were surprised to find that the mechanisms underlying this increased activity differed between the two groups. By giving naïve rats a dose of alcohol, the researchers engaged proteins called calcium channels and increased neuronal activity. Neurons fired as the specific calcium channels at play, called L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (LTCCs), boosted the release of a neurotransmitter called GABA. Blocking these LTCCs reduced voluntary alcohol consumption in naïve rats. But in alcohol-dependent rats, the researchers found decreased abundance of LTCCs on neuronal cell membranes, disrupting their normal ability to drive a dose of alcohol’s effects on CeA activity. Instead, increased neuronal activity was driven by a stress hormone called corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and its type 1 receptor (CRF1). The researchers found that blocking CeA CRF1s reduced voluntary alcohol consumption in the dependent rats. Studying these two groups shed light on how alcohol functionally alters the brain, Roberto explained. “There is a switch in the molecular mechanisms underlying the CeA’s response to alcohol (from LTCC- to CRF1-driven) as the individual transitions to the alcohol-dependent state,” she said. The cellular and molecular experiments were led by TSRI Research Associate and study first author Florence Varodayan. The behavioral tests were conducted by TSRI Research Associate Giordano de Guglielmo in the lab of TSRI Associate Professor Olivier George. Roberto hopes the findings lead to better ways to treat alcohol dependence. Alcohol use disorder appears to have many different root causes, but the new findings suggest doctors could analyze certain symptoms or genetic markers to determine which patients are likely to have CRF-CRF1 hyperactivation and benefit from the development of a novel drug that blocks that activity. In addition to Roberto, Varodayan and de Guglielmo, authors of the study, “Alcohol dependence disrupts amygdalar L-type voltage-gated calcium channel mechanisms,” were Marian Logrip and Olivier George of TSRI. The study was supported by the National Institutes of Health (grants AA015566, AA021491, AA017447, AA006420, AA013498, AA020608, AA022977 and AA021802).


News Article | April 12, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

Zika Virus - What You Should Know Ebola - What You Should Know A momentous discovery brings the scientific community one step closer to finding the cure for AIDS. In a groundbreaking achievement, a team from The Scripps Research Institute in California created a cell culture that is resistant to the HIV virus. Their approach, which research senior leader Dr. Richard Lerner, an immunology professor at the institute, describes as a form of "cellular vaccination," aims to provide long-term protection against the virus. In a TSRI news release, researchers explained the procedure works by attaching HIV-fighting antibodies to immune cells. Lab experiments showed these upgraded power-packing cells "can quickly replace diseased cells, potentially curing the disease in a person with HIV" through gradual displacement. Unlike other antibody therapies, where the agents float freely in the bloodstream and are administered in relatively low concentrations, the new technique allows the antibodies to bind to the cell's surface. The technique is known as the "neighbor effect" and relies on the effectiveness of close-by antibodies, which is more potent than having them widely distributed in the bloodstream. "The ultimate goal will be the control of HIV in patients with AIDS without the need for other medications," say study authors. Before this approach can be tested on patients, TSRI will enlist the collaboration of independent cancer research and treatment center City of Hope, in conducting into the new therapy's efficacy and safety. Dr. Joseph Alvarnas, director of the center's value-based analytics department, believes this research is particularly important because people with HIV still have a high risk of cancer even if they are on antiretroviral treatments. "HIV is treatable but not curable — this remains a disease that causes a lot of suffering," said Dr. Alvarnas. Initially modeled after the rhinovirus (the most frequent cause of the common cold), the procedure was later adapted for the HIV virus. Researchers grew human cells in a petri dish and delivered them a gene that activates the production of specific antibodies. The antibodies adhere to a crucial receptor on the cell's surface, called CD4, which all HIV strains need to attach to in order to develop the infection. This protects the receptor and effectively hinders the virus's access to it, preventing the infection from spreading. In the absence of these antibodies, the immune cells were killed by HIV. Only protected cells survived and multiplied, passing on the protective gene to new cells. Jia Xie, senior staff scientist at TSRI and first author of the study, plans to continue his research by trying to engineer antibodies that protect a different receptor on the cell surface. The findings have been detailed in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

San Diego Symphony Guest Conductors and New Repertoire in 2017-2018 This season, San Diegans will have the opportunity to hear 11 guest conductors, six of whom are returning from last season: Johannes Debus, David Danzmayr, Fabien Gabel, Cristian Măcelaru, Markus Stenz and Edo de Waart. De Waart brings his decades-long experience to the orchestra, with whom he has developed a special relationship, and will open and close the season in programs featuring Wagner’s Prelude to Die Meistersinger with Strauss’ Ein Heldenleben and Bernstein’s Overture to Candide with Brahms Symphony No. 2. Returning for the first time since 1999 is conductor and pianist Jeffrey Kahane. Making their San Diego Symphony debut performances are: Jader Bignamini (resident conductor of the Orchestra Sinfonica la Verdi), Rafael Payare (chief conductor of the Ulster Orchestra) and Steve Schick (Distinguished Professor of Music at the University of California, San Diego and music director of the La Jolla Symphony and Chorus and artistic director of the San Francisco Contemporary Music Players). San Diego Symphony Conductor Laureate Jahja Ling will return for two weeks in the spring. Associate Conductor Sameer Patel, who will be making his Jacobs Masterworks Series debut, will also lead the orchestra in various programs throughout the season. San Diego Symphony chief executive officer, Martha Gilmer, stated, “In creating the Jacobs Masterworks season, we are looking to bring familiar works to life, as well as introduce new artists and new works to our audiences, not only to feed their curiosity, but also to enlighten and engage, and to earn their trust.” Fourteen classical works will receive their San Diego debut during the 2017-18 Season. In alphabetical order they include: BACEWICZ: Overture for Orchestra; BARBER: Music for a Scene from Shelley; BERNSTEIN: Symphony No. 1: Jeremiah; DEBUSSY: Iberia; DEBUSSY: Jeux; HAYDN: Symphony No. 103: Drum Roll; KODÁLY: Concerto for Orchestra; MAZZOLLI: River Rouge Transfiguration; WYNTON MARSALIS: Violin Concerto; RAMEAU: Selections from Les Indes Galantes; RESPIGHI: La Boutique fantasque: Suite; Adam SCHOENBERG: Violin Concerto (World Premiere); ROBERTO SIERRA: Con Madera, Metal y Cuero (Percussion Concerto); TAKEMITSU: From Me Flows What You Call Time; TCHAIKOVSKY: Sérénade mélancolique. Sure to excite audiences all season long are several young, highly acclaimed and accomplished musicians making their San Diego debuts. While these artists may be new to performing in San Diego, they represent the highest achievement in their field from around the globe. Guests include: Behzod Abduraimov, piano; Nicola Benedetti, violin; Jennifer Johnson Cano, mezzo-soprano; Martin Helmchen, piano; Aiyun Huang, percussion; Andrei Ioniţă, cello; Simone Lamsma, violin; Adam Lau, bass; George Li, piano; Christina and Michelle Naughton, duo piano; and Audra McDonald, actress and singer. The San Diego Symphony is proud to be presenting the world premiere of Adam Schoenberg’s violin concerto, commissioned by violinist Anne Akiko Meyers, who will be performing the work in February. Schoenberg (no relation to composer Arnold Schoenberg) is considered one of the leading composers working today, and was recently named one of the top 10 most performed living classical composers by orchestras in the U.S. He is also an accomplished and versatile film composer, scoring two feature-length films and several shorts. His work was last performed by the San Diego Symphony as part of the 2015 – 2016 season. The season features several major piano concertos and brings to San Diego returning and debuting artists, including Jean-Yves Thibaudet, who opens the season, performing Liszt’s Piano Concerto No. 2. In November pianist Louis Lortie performs Ravel’s G Major Concerto, and 21 year-old pianist George Li performs Chopin’s Piano Concerto No. 1. Pinchas Zukerman returns February 2 and 3 conducting and performing as violin soloist in two works by Tchaikovsky. Andrei Ioniţă, a Romanian cellist who won the 1st prize in the 2015 International Tchaikovsky competition, performs the Elgar Cello Concerto, a cornerstone of the solo cello repertoire. In April, Behzod Abduraimov will perform one of the most famous concertos: Rachmaninoff’s Piano Concerto No. 3, hailed by most as one of the most technically challenging piano concertos in the classical repertoire. “Our vision programmatically is to ensure the San Diego Symphony is presenting fresh and new talent that will excite our audiences,” said Gilmer. “It’s thrilling to get to know so many young and gifted musicians who are making an impact internationally. We look forward to presenting these exceptional artists in a variety of programs to the San Diego community throughout 2017-18.” It’s About Time: A Festival of Rhythm. Sound. And Place. In January 2018, the San Diego Symphony will explore the world of percussion in a month-long celebration of rhythm, sound and place curated by UCSD professor and famed percussionist, Steve Schick. “Steve is a force of nature. His curiosity, energy and vision is breathtaking and I could not be more excited that he has infused this festival with his tremendous ideas,” stated Gilmer. Schick will also be making his conducting debut. It’s About Time: A Festival of Rhythm. Sound. And Place. starts on January 13, 2018 with Puerto Rico-born American composer Roberto Sierra’s percussion concerto, Con Madera, Metal, y Cuero, a Caribbean mash-up of rhythm and energy in which festival curator Steve Schick will perform on an array of percussion instruments stretching across the front of the stage. Audiences will have a chance to admire the excellent percussion section of the San Diego Symphony on full display in Rimsky-Korsakov’s lively Capriccio espagnol. The festival will culminate on the stage of Copley Symphony Hall with a rare performance of Toru Takemitsu’s glorious From me flows what you call Time, for five solo percussionists and large orchestra—an essay of transcendental beauty, featuring percussion instruments from five continents. The festival will move beyond the confines of the concert hall in an outdoor performance of John Luther Adams’s Inuksuit, for a US/Mexican bi-national percussion group of more than 50 players. Three “Percussion Love Fests,” hosted at Bread & Salt, will showcase a display of local percussion talent, local rising stars and established legends, from jazz and rock drummers to Brazilian, African and Latin percussionists. For an immersive, “surround-sound” experience, audiences will be offered a rare performance of Michael Pisaro’s A Wave and Waves. One hundred percussionists will rustle, gently scrape, bow or drop rice upon a menagerie of percussion instruments to create a 70-minute sonic environment. More festival events will be announced including drop-in concerts, informal conversations, hands-on experiments, and up-close encounters with artists throughout the month. In addition to the formal programming being offered in concerts throughout the festival, emphasis will be placed on community engagement activities that celebrate percussion throughout San Diego. The San Diego Symphony looks forward to exploring both the diversity and similarity of this instrument family through drum circles, craft workshops, and performances in community venues. Beyond The Score® is a program of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra that began in 2004 as an audience development initiative. The format is that of a live documentary, with the first half of the performance including a narrative that explores a single piece of a composer’s music. Through the words of the composer and his contemporaries, the narrative behind and around the music evolves. Actors and projected images combine with musical examples performed by the orchestra. The first Beyond The Score®, on February 9, 2018, features Rachmaninov’s Isle of the Dead conducted by Associate Conductor Sameer Patel. The second performance on April 15, is Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 27, K. 595 with Jeffrey Kahane as both conductor and piano soloist. Beyond The Score® has more than 30 titles in its library with these productions being performed by orchestras nationally and internationally. The extremely popular and successful Jazz @ The Jacobs returns with Gilbert Castellanos continuing in his role as series curator. From November through April, the five-concert series features a new and exciting lineup of programs and guest artists. The season opens with a tribute to the First Lady of Song, Ella Fitzgerald, in her Centennial year and features her favorite accompanist in her later years, pianist Mike Wofford. In January it’s The Roots of Rhythm followed in February with Affinity: A Ray Brown and Oscar Peterson Tribute. Jazz @ The Jacobs Series Curator Gilbert Castellanos closes out the series presenting a live performance of every track of Miles Davis’ Kind of Blue in collaboration with some of today’s hottest young jazz artists. Continuing its great success as a dedicated film series, the Fox Theatre Film Series for the 2017-18 season enters its second year of a four-year project in which the San Diego Symphony, as part of a national network of orchestras, will screen all eight Harry Potter films. Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban – will be shown on the big screen while the San Diego Symphony performs the John Williams’ film score live on stage. Harry Potter is one of those once-in-a-lifetime cultural phenomena that continue to delight millions of fans around the world. This series kicks off with Ratatouille and also includes the classic Christmas movie It’s A Wonderful Life. Two silent films will be shown during the season as well: The Passion of Joan of Arc with small chamber music accompaniment in the spring and concluding the series in May, Metropolis, accompanied by Russ Peck on the Fox Theatre Pipe Organ. The Family Concerts are the perfect way to introduce children (and their parents) to symphonic music through an engaging and enlightening program that often features a guest artist or narrator. The concerts include activities prior to the start of the performance, which give children the chance to see some of the instruments up close and to perhaps even try making their own music. This season’s Family concerts run the gamut from 1001 Symphonic Tales, Rimsky-Korsakov’s adventure-filled masterpiece Scheherazade to Tchaikovsky Deconstructed, where with the help of actors from San Diego Junior Theatre we’ll discover how this Russian composer built a masterpiece – the famous 1812 Overture. There is also the Family holiday concert, Noel Noel, featuring timeless holiday classics. Family concerts are one hour—designed to engage the attention of the youngest concertgoers. For those looking to enhance the Jacobs Masterworks concert-going experience, San Diego Symphony offers “What’s The Score?”, a 20-minute, pre-concert lecture to enlighten and illuminate audiences about the evening’s program. Our resident classical music commentator, Nuvi Mehta, offers a fascinating look into the meaning of the music and the motivation of the composer—all the highs, lows, drama and intrigue. In addition to the genius and personalities of the individual composers, Mehta often discusses the social, economic and political forces of the day that contributed to how and why a piece of music was written. The popular music series City Lights makes a triumphant return with appearances by The Manhattan Transfer, Louisiana soul-rocker Marc Broussaurd and Friends, our annual Noel Noel holiday celebration, and a special appearance by Broadway’s fabulous Audra McDonald with the San Diego Symphony. This season the San Diego Symphony is introducing three new mini-subscription options. Classical Subscription Package pricing ranges from $72 - $1,344. On sale:      Subscriptions on sale: Sunday, April 9, 2017      Single tickets on sale for 2017-18: Sunday, August 20, 2017 SAT NOV 11 | SUN NOV 12 FABULOUS FRANCE Johannes Debus, conductor Louis Lortie, piano RAMEAU: Selections from Les Indes Galantes RAVEL: Piano Concerto in G Major FAURÉ: Suite from Pelléas et Mélisande DEBUSSY: Iberia FRI DEC 1 | SAT DEC 2 CHOPIN AND DVOŘÁK David Danzmayr, conductor George Li, piano BACEWICZ: Overture for Orchestra CHOPIN: Piano Concerto No. 1 DVOŘÁK: Symphony No. 8 SAT DEC 9 | SUN DEC 10 WINTER DAYDREAMS Johannes Debus, conductor Rose Lombardo, flute Julie Phillips, harp HUMPERDINCK: Prelude to Hansel and Gretel MOZART: Concerto for Flute and Harp TCHAIKOVSKY: Symphony No. 1: Winter Daydreams SAT JAN 20 | SUN JAN 21 PLACES IN TIME Jader Bignamini, conductor ROSSINI: Overture to William Tell MARTUCCI: Notturno RIMSKY-KORSAKOV: Capriccio espagnole RESPIGHI: La Boutique fantasque: Suite RESPIGHI: Pines of Rome FRI JAN 26 | SUN JAN 28 STORIES IN TIME Steven Schick, conductor Aiyun Huang, percussion Percussionists of the San Diego Symphony RAVEL: Mother Goose Suite TAKEMITSU: From me flows what you call Time MAZZOLLI: River Rouge Transfiguration BARTÓK: Miraculous Mandarin Suite FRI FEB 2 | SAT FEB 3 ZUKERMAN PLAYS TCHAIKOVSKY Pinchas Zukerman, conductor/violin TCHAIKOVSKY: "Melodie" from Souvenir d'un lieu cher TCHAIKOVSKY: Sérénade mélancolique TCHAIKOVSKY: Serenade for Strings MENDELSSOHN: Symphony No. 4: Italian FRI FEB 9 BEYOND THE SCORE: ISLE OF THE DEAD Sameer Patel, conductor RACHMANINOFF: Isle of the Dead *Beyond The Score* FRI MAR 9 | SUN MAR 11 BACH AND MAHLER Edo de Waart, conductor; Jeff Thayer, violin BACH: Violin Concerto in A minor MAHLER: Symphony No. 1 FRI APR 13 | SAT APR 14 JEFFREY KAHANE PLAYS MOZART Jeffrey Kahane, conductor/piano MOZART: Piano Concerto No. 27, K. 595 BARBER: Music for a Scene from Shelley SCHUMANN: Symphony No. 3: Rhenish SUN APR 15 BEYOND THE SCORE: MOZART’S PIANO CONCERTO NO. 27 Jeffrey Kahane, conductor/piano MOZART: Piano Concerto No. 27, K. 595 *Beyond The Score* FRI APR 20 | SAT APR 21 | SUN APR 22 RACH 3 Jahja Ling, conductor Behzod Abduraimov, piano BERNSTEIN: "Times Square Ballet" from On the Town RACHMANINOFF: Piano Concerto No. 3 SHOSTAKOVICH: Symphony No. 5 FRI MAY 4 | SUN MAY 6 DANCES, SUITES AND SERENADES Fabien Gabel, conductor; Simone Lamsma, violin BERNSTEIN: Three Dance Variations from Fancy Free BERNSTEIN: Serenade for Violin and Orchestra R. STRAUSS: Suite from Der Rosenkavalier OFFENBACH: Suite from Gaîté Parisienne FRI MAY 11 | SAT MAY 12 | SUN MAY 13 BARBER, BERNSTEIN, BEETHOVEN Jahja Ling, conductor Kelley O'Connor, mezzo-soprano Martin Helmchen, piano BARBER: Adagio for Strings BERNSTEIN: Symphony No. 1: Jeremiah BEETHOVEN: Piano Concerto No. 5: Emperor FRI MAY 25 | SAT MAY 26 | SUN MAY 27 SEASON FINALE WITH EDO DE WAART Edo de Waart, conductor Christina and Michelle Naughton, duo piano BERNSTEIN: Overture to Candide POULENC: Concerto for Two Pianos BRAHMS: Symphony No. 2 SAT | NOV 25 | 8pm THE FIRST LADY OF SONG: AN ELLA FITZGERALD TRIBUTE The Great American Songbook had few interpreters with more grace, style and vocal excellence than the wonderful Ella Fitzgerald. The Jazz @ The Jacobs season opens with a tribute to the First Lady of Song in her Centennial year and features her favorite accompanist in her later years, pianist Mike Wofford. SAT | JAN 27 | 8pm THE ROOTS OF RHYTHM As part of the January “It’s About Time” festival, this concert will explore the origins and evolution of the various rhythmic styles that made their way from all over the world to America, becoming part of the modern jazz idiom. John Santos, one of the foremost exponents of Afro-Latin music in the world today (as both musician and historian), will survey jazz’s “root system” by way of his remarkable personal collection of percussion instruments in performance with several special guests. SAT | FEB 24 | 8pm AFFINITY: A RAY BROWN AND OSCAR PETERSON TRIBUTE From 1951 to 1966, bassist Ray Brown and pianist Oscar Peterson were partners in the Oscar Peterson Trio, recording some of the most exciting and beloved jazz music of that era. This concert catches the spirit of this famous and fruitful collaboration with some of today’s finest keyboard and string bass artists. Our special guest will be bassist John Clayton, considered Ray Brown’s main protégé and legacy-keeper, who performs on Mr. Brown’s bass. SAT | MAR 24 | 8pm JAZZ @ THE JACOBS SPECIAL: CHICK COREA WITH THE JAZZ AT LINCOLN CENTER ORCHESTRA One of the major jazz piano voices of the last fifty years, Chick Corea, comes to Copley Symphony Hall with the world-famous Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra in a one-night-only special concert. From his avant garde early work with Miles Davis to later explorations of free jazz, jazz fusion and contemporary classical music, Chick Corea remains at the cutting edge of the art form. SAT | APR 28 | 8pm KIND OF BLUE – IN CONCERT Miles Davis released his classic Kind of Blue album in 1959; it subsequently became one of the best-selling jazz albums of all time and changed the possibilities of jazz forever. Jazz @ The Jacobs Series Curator Gilbert Castellanos will present a live performance of every track of Kind of Blue in collaboration with some of today’s hottest young jazz artists. SAT | NOV 4 | 8pm (SPECIAL) DAY OF THE DEAD CONCERT WITH EUGENIA LEÓN* *San Diego Symphony musician do not appear in these performances SUN | OCT 15 | 2pm 1001 SYMPHONIC TALES Sameer Patel, conductor Every story is better with music! Come dive into the wonder of Rimsky-Korsakov’s adventure-filled masterpiece Scheherazade and discover how a composer can conjure exotic worlds using just a few magical musical seeds. SUN | DEC 17 | 2pm NOEL NOEL – A FAMILY CONCERT Sameer Patel, conductor Who doesn’t love holiday music? Gathering together as a family, listening to timeless classics and singing along to your favorite carols is a traditional everyone enjoys! In one short afternoon concert, you’ll see and hear the Symphony…and maybe even a certain jolly North Pole resident! SUN | FEB 25 | 2pm BEAT QUEST! A Musical Journey through Rhythm, Time and Place Sameer Patel, conductor Music is a passport that can take our imagination to a certain time and place. From swingin’ jazz, to the Habanera from Carmen, to Beethoven’s symphonies, we’ll explore how these beats came to be, and how distinctive rhythms transport us to cities like Vienna, Seville and New Orleans. SUN | MAR 25 | 2pm TCHAIKOVSKY DECONSTRUCTED Sameer Patel, conductor Melodies. Cannons. Fireworks. Lots of people recognize the famous 1812 Overture, but few know the story behind it. What inspired Tchaikovsky to write this piece? With the help of actors from San Diego Junior Theatre, we’ll look at the creative process, take this piece apart and put it back together to discover how this Russian composer built a masterpiece for all time. SAT | OCT 28 | 8pm Ratatouille For the first time ever, Disney and Pixar release their Academy Award winning film Ratatouille in high-definition on the big screen while the beloved score by composer Michael Giacchino is performed live by symphony orchestra. SUN | DEC 3 | 2pm It’s A Wonderful Life Experience one of the most cherished holiday movies of all time like you’ve never seen it before: It’s a Wonderful Life — in Concert. You know the story: struggling Bedford Falls hero George Bailey discovers, through the timely intervention of his Guardian Angel Clarence on Christmas Eve, that he’s the “richest man in town.” Now this timeless classic will be accompanied by the San Diego Symphony performing Dmitri Tiomkin’s richly sentimental score LIVE. FRI | FEB 16 | 8pm (subscriber night) SUN | FEB 18 | 2pm Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban™ Relive the magic of your favorite wizard in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban™ — in Concert. Based on the third installment of J.K. Rowling’s classic saga, fans of all ages can now experience the thrilling tale accompanied by the music of a live symphony orchestra as Harry soars across the big screen. Get ready to encounter a Dementor™, ride the Knight Bus™ and discover just who Sirius Black™ really is! HARRY POTTER, characters, names and related indicia are © & ™ Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc. J.K. ROWLING'S WIZARDING WORLD™ J.K. Rowling and Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc. Publishing Rights © JKR. (s17) SAT | MAR 17 | 8pm Metropolis (1927): Silent Film with Organ Accompaniment German expressionist director Fritz Lang’s colossal Silent Era sci-fi masterpiece Metropolis is more timely than ever, with its depiction of class struggle and the dangers of society’s servitude to technology. Organist Russ Peck accompanies this involving, dramatic work on the mighty Fox Theatre Pipe Organ. Film is free for Fox Theatre Film Series Subscribers. SAT | MAY 19 | 8pm The Passion of Joan of Arc (1928): Silent Film with Ensemble Accompaniment Carl Theodor Dreyer’s The Passion of Joan of Arc is often cited as one of the most remarkable films ever made. Its series of mesmerizing close-ups and the yearning, hypnotic performance of Renée Jeanne Falconetti as Joan are simply unforgettable. The film’s sense of religious transcendence will be heightened by a unique collaboration with San Diego art music collective Luscious Noise, who will perform John Luther Adams’ stunning In the White Silence live as the film plays. Film is free for Fox Theatre Film Series Subscribers. SUN | OCT 8 | 2pm – JACOBS MUSIC CENTER JEAN-YVES THIBAUDET Jean-Yves Thibaudet, piano Enjoy an afternoon of pure Parisian style as pianist Jean-Yves Thibaudet completes his opening weekend visit with this Chamber Music Series concert inside Copley Symphony Hall. TUE | NOV 28 | 7:30pm – TSRI CHRISTOPHER O’RILEY: SHUFFLE. PLAY. LISTEN. Christopher O’Riley, piano As the longtime host of NPR’s hugely popular From the Top series, Christopher O’Riley has stayed close to the freshest ideas and performances of today’s classical music world. His highly acclaimed recordings have featured works by everyone from Stravinsky and Piazzolla to Radiohead and Elliot Smith. WED | DEC 20 | 7:30pm – JACOBS MUSIC CENTER FANFARES AND CELEBRATIONS As the heart of the holiday season approaches, the San Diego Symphony Orchestra will perform music with that special festive sparkle. TUE | JAN 16 | 7:30pm – JACOBS MUSIC CENTER A LISTENER’S GUIDE Part of the “It’s About Time” festival, this concert will feature music that emphasizes touch, rhythm and the many intriguing sound textures available to our talented battery of San Diego Symphony percussion musicians. TUE | FEB 13 | 7:30pm – TSRI THE WORLD OF WU MAN Wu Man, pipa She chooses to live in San Diego County (lucky us!), but Wu Man’s fame and influence span the globe, with her numerous performances and commissions for her unique string instrument, the pipa, as well as her prominent participation in Yo-Yo Ma’s transcendent Silk Road Project as one of its founding members. TUE | MAR 6 | 7:30pm – TSRI J.S. BACH AND FRIENDS Musicians of the San Diego Symphony invite you to an intimate evening at the Auditorium of TSRI featuring the sublime music of Johann Sebastian Bach and his contemporaries. TUE | APR 10 | 7:30pm – TSRI ANDREI IONIȚĂ, ROMANIAN RHAPSODIST Andrei Ioniță, cello Andrei Ioniță is an emerging young cellist from Romania who won First Prize at the International Tchaikovsky Competition in Moscow in June 2015. He recently made his debut with the Berlin Philharmonic and has been engaged regularly by Valery Gergiev. TUE | MAY 8 | 7:30pm – JACOBS MUSIC CENTER BERNSTEIN AND BEETHOVEN WITH ORLI SHAHAM Orli Shaham, piano Pianist Orli Shaham, who has been acclaimed for her flawless technique, reflective grace and subtlety of touch, returns to the Chamber Music Series for our season finale, part of our month-long Bernstein Centennial celebration. *San Diego Symphony musicians appear on each Chamber Music Program. About the San Diego Symphony Founded in 1910, the San Diego Symphony is the oldest orchestra in California and one of the largest and most significant cultural organizations in San Diego. The Orchestra performs for over 250,000 people each season, offering a wide variety of programming at its two much loved venues, Copley Symphony Hall in downtown San Diego and the Embarcadero Marina Park South on San Diego Bay. The orchestra’s 81 full-time musicians, graduates of the finest and most celebrated music schools in the United States and abroad, also serve as the orchestra for the San Diego Opera each season, as well as performing at several regional performing arts centers. For over 30 years, the San Diego Symphony has provided comprehensive music education and community engagement programs reaching more than 65,000 students annually and bringing innovative programming to San Diego’s diverse neighborhoods and schools. For more information, visit http://www.sandiegosymphony.org.

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