Center Point, AL, United States
Center Point, AL, United States

Troy University is a comprehensive public university that is located in Troy, Alabama, United States. It was founded on February 26, 1887 as Troy State Normal School within the Alabama State University System by an Act of the Alabama Legislature. It is the flagship university of the Troy University System with its main campus enrollment of 6,998 students and the total enrollment of all Troy University campuses of 19,579. Troy University is regionally accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges to award associate, baccalaureate, master's, education specialist, and doctoral degrees.In August 2005, Troy State University, Montgomery; Troy State University, Phenix City; Troy State University, Dothan; and Troy State University all merged under one accreditation to become Troy University to better reflect the institution's worldwide mission. Prior to the merger, each campus was independently accredited and merging of these campuses helped to create a stronger institution by eliminating overlapping services and barriers to students. The merger combined talents and resources of staff, faculty, and administrators into a single highly effective and competitive university.Today, the University serves the educational needs of students in four Alabama campuses, sixty teaching sites in 17 U.S. States and 11 countries. Troy University's graduates number more than 100,000 alumni representing all 50 states and from numerous foreign countries. Troy University is known as Alabama's International University for its extensive international program in attracting foreign students from around the world. Wikipedia.


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—On April 27, 2011, TV weatherman James Spann warned viewers that a “large, multiple-vortex tornado” was bearing down on Tuscaloosa, Ala. “You should have been in your safe place 20 minutes ago,” he said as a camera tracked the funnel clouds, “but if by chance you’re hearing me at the last minute on the radio, get into a safe place right now!” Despite these warnings, 252 Alabamians died that day, victims of the fourth-deadliest tornado season in US history. Mr. Spann, who still serves as chief meteorologist for Birmingham’s WBMA-TV, drew a clear lesson from the tragedy. “What we learned that day is that physical science could not have been better,” he remembers in a phone interview with The Christian Science Monitor, “but what maybe we don't understand is the social science part of it.” The nature of twisters makes their exact timing and location difficult to predict. But since 2011, sociological research and storms like Alabama’s have spurred a shift in forecasting practices. Meteorologists now aim to reduce false alarms – even at the risk of missed storms and delayed warnings – in the hopes that residents will heed the warnings they do issue. “There is a recognition that the false alarm rate is something that we need to take into consideration,” explains economist Kevin Simmons, who researches the statistics of natural disasters. Tornado forecasters’ performance gets measured by three key numbers: “Since around 2011, both tornado lead-time and detection have gotten worse. But the false alarm rate has improved (decreased),” The Washington Post reported on April 20. Harold Brooks, a senior scientist at the National Severe Storms Laboratory, explains that he and other forecasters face a trade-off: Longer lead-times and higher POD’s versus a lower false alarm rate. As forecasters wait for more evidence – from radar, spotter teams, and other sources – before sounding the alarm, they issue fewer false ones. But they’re also more likely to miss some, and give residents less time to take cover. “Our skill hasn’t changed” in recent years, he tells the Monitor over the phone, but they have employed “a higher threshold for warning.” Despite the obvious risks of missing a storm or cutting down on warning time, Dr. Simmons, a professor of economics at Austin College, in Sherman, Texas, says there’s merit in reducing false alarms. “If a tornado strikes an area with a higher-than-average false alarm rate, it's more likely that that tornado would generate fatalities [than in an area] with lower-than-average false alarm rates,” he tells the Monitor. In 2009, he and economist Dan Sutter, currently at Alabama's Troy University, assessed the trade-off between false-alarm rates and POD, finding “strong [statistical] evidence that a higher local, recent FAR significantly increases tornado fatalities and injuries.” As residents hear one false alarm after another, the “cry-wolf effect” takes hold, and they’re less disposed to heed the one warning that could save their lives. Two years after they published these findings, the devastating 2011 season bore them out. In Birmingham, where almost 80 percent of warnings were false, Spann insists, “there's no doubt in my mind a high false alarm ratio in 2011 killed people." The National Weather Service (NWS) reached a similar conclusion in Joplin, Mo., which suffered one of that year’s worst twisters. It found that “the perceived frequency of siren activation (false alarms) led a large number of [residents] to become desensitized or complacent to this method of warning.” Dr. Brooks cites this survey as a key reason behind the new focus on false-alarm rates. It's since edged down, from 73 percent in 2011 to 70 percent in 2015. Sure enough, the same period saw forecasters detecting fewer storms, with POD going from 75 percent to 58 percent. But Eric Waage, director of emergency management for Hennepin County, Minn., says not all of the missed storms give cause for concern. “The most problematic thing we have are these small ... EF-0 tornadoes,” he tells the Monitor via phone. These are the weakest storms on the Enhanced Fujita scale that measures tornado strength in the United States and Canada based on the damage they cause. Spann explains that, because of their short duration, “trying to warn for those suckers ... is like playing Whack-a-Mole." These days, forecasters may find it harder to get enough evidence to warn against these storms. But they also have more room for error. EF-0 and EF-1 storms occasionally make the NWS’s killer tornado list, but most deadly storms are EF-2 and up. Mr. Waage says that “in most places in our state, those small ones aren't really a huge problem. They're hitting cornfields and forests.” The third key tornado metric, lead-time, has also dropped amid the NWS's focus on false alarms, from 15 minutes in 2011 to just eight in 2015. But that national trend obscures local variations. Spann remembers that April 27, 2011 saw lead-times as high as 40 minutes. Since that tragic day, the local NWS office's average lead-times have dropped slightly – and false alarms have plunged. “We've got to get the FAR down,” Spann says, “and if we lose a little lead-time, I don't have any problem with that.” 'We are better than that' A 2011-caliber season hasn’t yet tested this new mind-set, and Brooks, speaking with the Post’s Jason Samenow, cautioned that social science research on this topic is “difficult to conduct and often inconclusive.” But it could provide lifesaving guidance for the Midwest’s “Tornado Alley” and the Southeast’s “Dixie Alley,” at least until the next major leap in meteorology. Last week, President Trump signed a bill aiming to extend tornado prediction time beyond one hour. But Brooks cautions that, to lengthen lead-times without raising too many more false alarms, “we need to move a long way from that [current] skill line, and that's hard.” He says it’s happened before, thanks to Doppler radar and other innovations in the 1990s. One government program, Warn on Forecast, aims to repeat the feat with numerical models, but practical applications remain “years away.” For the moment, forecasters are fine-tuning the balance of lead-time, POD, and false-alarm rate, and authorities are trying to get more people to respond to warnings. “The missing link still is that public awareness,” says Hennepin County’s Waage. To minimize confusion when the skies darken, for instance, he explains that Minnesota has recently standardized its siren procedures. Birmingham, Ala., has also seen a push for greater tornado awareness since 2011, and Spann thinks it’s heading in the right direction. “There have been too many funerals on my watch in 38 years,” as a meteorologist, he reflects. “And we are better than that. And now, working with the social science people, I think that's going to make a huge difference.” [Editor's note: This article has been updated to correctly state the university where Dan Sutter currently works]


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Leading higher education information and resource provider AffordableCollegesOnline.org has announced its list of the best online colleges for veterans and military personnel for 2017. The ranking names the top 59 two- and four-year schools and the top 50 four-year schools in the nation based on service member-friendly benefits, affordability and program quality. The four-year schools with the best scores were University of Southern Mississippi, Webster University, Saint Leo University, University of Idaho and Murray State University. The top five two-year schools include Central Texas College, St. Philip’s College, Mount Wachusett Community College, Wake Technical Community College and Del Mar College. "Veterans and current members of the military face some unique challenges when it comes to earning a certificate or degree,” said Dan Schuessler, CEO and founder of AffordableCollegesOnline.org. “These schools have demonstrated a commitment to providing outstanding benefits and resources to service members who choose to pursue an online education, while also maintaining affordability and quality standards.” To qualify for a spot on AffordableCollegesOnline.org’s rankings, schools must meet several minimum requirements. Each college cited is institutionally accredited and holds public or private not-for-profit standing. Each is also scored based on a comparison of more than a dozen metrics including the availability and amount of financial aid, military tuition discounts, ROTC programs, veteran support services and graduation rates by school. AffordableCollegesOnline.org enforces strict affordability standards, requiring schools to offer in-state tuition rates below $20,000 per year for four-year schools, and below $5,000 per year for two-year schools. All eligible school scores are compared to determine the final “Best” list. For complete details on the data and methodology used to score each school and a full list of ranking colleges, visit: Top Four-Year Schools in the U.S. with Military-Friendly Online Programs for 2017: Arkansas State University-Main Campus Azusa Pacific University Ball State University Columbia College Dallas Baptist University Duquesne University East Carolina University Eastern Kentucky University Hampton University Hawaii Pacific University Iowa State University Kansas State University Lawrence Technological University Lewis University Mercy College Mississippi State University Missouri State University-Springfield Montana State University-Billings Murray State University New England College Niagara University Northern Arizona University Northern Kentucky University Norwich University Oklahoma State University-Main Campus Oral Roberts University Point Park University Regis University Saint Leo University Texas A & M University-College Station The College of Saint Scholastica The University of Alabama The University of Montana Tiffin University Troy University University of Arizona University of Cincinnati-Main Campus University of Idaho University of Mississippi University of Nebraska at Omaha University of North Carolina at Greensboro University of Oklahoma-Norman Campus University of South Florida-Main Campus University of Southern Mississippi University of the Incarnate Word University of Toledo Viterbo University Washington State University Webster University Western Kentucky University Top Two-Year Schools in the U.S. with Military-Friendly Online Programs for 2017: ### AffordableCollegesOnline.org began in 2011 to provide quality data and information about pursuing an affordable higher education. Our free community resource materials and tools span topics such as financial aid and college savings, opportunities for veterans and people with disabilities, and online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning environments that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational and career success. We have been featured by nearly 1,100 postsecondary institutions and nearly 120 government organizations.


A Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) interceptor (R) is seen in Seongju, South Korea, April 26, 2017. Picture taken April 26, 2017. Lee Jong-hyeon/News1 via REUTERS SEOUL (Reuters) - U.S. President Donald Trump's suggestion that South Korea could pay for an advanced U.S. missile defense system could test the strength of the alliance between Seoul and Washington at a time of rising tensions with North Korea, analysts said on Friday. In an exclusive interview, Trump told Reuters on Thursday that he wants South Korea to pay for the $1 billion Terminal High Altitude Area Defence (THAAD) system. The remarks come as South Korea heads into a presidential election that will likely elect liberal front-runner Moon Jae-in, who has said the next administration in Seoul should have the final say on the deployment of THAAD. Moon's campaign office said the deployment of THAAD should be immediately suspended until then. "This almost certainly will become another self-inflicted wound for the alliance and for U.S. foreign policy," said Daniel Pinkston, a Troy University professor and expert on North and South Korea based in Seoul. Moon, who said in a book published in January that South Korea should learn to "say no to Americans", is leading polls by a wide margin ahead of South Korea's May 9 election to replace impeached former President Park Geun-hye, whose government agreed with Washington last year to deploy THAAD. If elected, Moon would end nearly a decade of conservative rule in South Korea, which has regarded the alliance with the United States dating back to the 1950-53 Korean War as a cornerstone of its defense against the threat of North Korea. Moon advocates dialogue with North Korea and has criticized the conservative government and its hawkish stance for failing to stop Pyongyang's weapons development. The Trump administration said on Wednesday it wanted to push North Korea into dismantling its nuclear and missile programs through tougher international sanctions and diplomatic pressure -- but remained open to negotiations to bring that about. Kim Ki-jung, a top foreign policy adviser to Moon, said the suggestion that South Korea pay for the system was an "impossible option". "Even if we purchase THAAD, its main operation would be in the hands of the United States," said Kim. "So purchasing it would be an impossible option."South Korea has never considered buying the system, partly because the cost involved was deemed prohibitive. Some liberal politicians have argued South Korea should develop its own indigenous missile defense system. THAAD's job is to intercept and destroy a ballistic missile in its final phase of flight. A battery comprises four parts: the truck-mounted launcher, eight anti-missile "interceptor" missiles, a radar system and a fire control system connecting it to U.S. military commanders. Seoul said the decision to deploy THAAD was ultimately a military decision taken by the United States. "He's using THAAD as a guinea pig to test the relationship," said Kim Dong-yub, a professor at Kyungnam University's Institute of Far Eastern Studies in Seoul. "Trump seems to be testing South Korea's commitment to the Korea-U.S. alliance. I wonder if Trump's saying this because he already thinks Moon will win," Kim added. In an interview with Reuters, Trump also said he will either renegotiate or terminate what he called a "horrible" free trade deal with South Korea. A second top foreign policy adviser to Moon said Trump's comments about the cost of THAAD poses fundamental questions about where the alliance may be headed. "This is a new dimension," said Chung Eui-yong, a former South Korean ambassador to Geneva who leads a team of foreign policy advisers for Moon. "Our position has been that we should review THAAD even if we are not paying for it, but his comments on the cost have changed the fundamental aspect of this issue," Chung told Reuters. "We will have to choose what is best for our national interests." The U.S. military started deploying THAAD in early March, despite strong opposition from China, which says the system's radar can be used to spy into its territory. The deployment also sparked protests from residents in Seonjgu in the southeast, where the system is being deployed, and prompted a North Korean warning of retaliation. China has imposed some restrictions on South Korean companies in China, which many in South Korea perceive as retaliation for deployment of the missile system.


The International Nurses Association is pleased to welcome Cathy Morris Pitts, CRNP, MSN, RN, CGRN, to their prestigious organization with her upcoming publication in the Worldwide Leaders in Healthcare. Cathy Morris Pitts is a Nurse Practitioner currently serving patients within Ivy Creek Health, LLC with Lake Martin Community Hospital and Lake Martin Family Medicine in Dadeville, Alabama, Wetumpka Urgent Care in Wetumpka, AL, and Ivy Creek Urgent Care in Tallassee, AL. With over three decades of experience in nursing, she is a specialist in critical care, emergency room, and  an expert gastroenterology nurse in endoscopy. Cathy’s career in nursing began in 1980, when she gained her Associate’s Degree in Nursing in from Troy University in Alabama. An advocate for continuing education, she later received her Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing in 2013 from Columbus State University in Georgia, and her Master of Science Degree in Nursing with a Nurse Practitioner concentration in 2016 from Auburn University in Alabama. Since graduating, Cathy has completed a number of advanced training courses, becoming a Certified Gastroenterology Registered Nurse and a Certified Registered Nurse Practitioner. To keep up to date with the latest advances and developments in nursing, Cathy maintains a professional membership with the American Association of Nurse Practitioners, the Society of Gastroenterology Nurses and Associates, and is also an inductee of the Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing. She attributes her success to the support of her husband and colleagues, her drive, and her belief in continual education and learning. In her free time, Cathy enjoys working in her flower gardens, sewing, crocheting, making her own jams and jellies, and propagating plants in her greenhouses. Learn more about Cathy Morris Pitts here: http://inanurse.org/network/index.php?do=/4135622/info/ and be sure to read her upcoming publication in Worldwide Leaders in Healthcare.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

LearnHowToBecome.org, a leading resource provider for higher education and career information, has ranked the best universities and colleges in Alabama for 2017. Using government-backed data, the site found 27 four-year schools had the caliber to be on the list. Samford University, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Spring Hill College, Auburn University and University of Alabama in Huntsville came in as the top five. 26 two-year schools also made the list, with Enterprise State Community College, Gadsden State Community College, Wallace State Community College Hanceville, Southern Union State Community College and Lurleen B. Wallace Community College ranked as the best five. A full list of schools is included below. “Alabama currently has the third-highest unemployment rate in the country, but schools are working to combat that by providing quality higher education opportunities,” said Wes Ricketts, senior vice president of LearnHowToBecome.Org. “The colleges and universities on our list offer certificates, degrees and employment resources that best set students up for success in the workforce after school.” To be included on the Alabama’s “Best Colleges” list, schools must be regionally accredited, not-for-profit institutions. Each college is also appraised for additional data that includes employment services, student counseling, annual alumni salaries 10 years after entering college, student/teacher ratio, graduation rate and financial aid offerings. Complete details on each college, their individual scores and the data and methodology used to determine the LearnHowToBecome.org “Best Colleges in Alabama” list, visit: The Best Four-Year Colleges in Alabama for 2017 include: Alabama A & M University Alabama State University Amridge University Athens State University Auburn University Auburn University at Montgomery Birmingham Southern College Faulkner University Huntingdon College Jacksonville State University Judson College Miles College Oakwood University Samford University Spring Hill College Stillman College Talladega College The University of Alabama Troy University Tuskegee University University of Alabama at Birmingham University of Alabama in Huntsville University of Mobile University of Montevallo University of North Alabama University of South Alabama University of West Alabama The Best Two-Year Colleges in Alabama for 2017 include: Alabama Southern Community College Bevill State Community College Bishop State Community College Calhoun State Community College Central Alabama Community College Chattahoochee Valley Community College Enterprise State Community College Faulkner State Community College Gadsden State Community College H Councill Trenholm State Technical College J F Drake State Community and Technical College J F Ingram State Technical College Jefferson Davis Community College Jefferson State Community College Lawson State Community College-Birmingham Campus Lurleen B Wallace Community College Northeast Alabama Community College Northwest-Shoals Community College Reid State Technical College Remington College-Mobile Campus Shelton State Community College Snead State Community College Southern Union State Community College Wallace Community College - Dothan Wallace Community College - Selma Wallace State Community College - Hanceville About Us: LearnHowtoBecome.org was founded in 2013 to provide data and expert driven information about employment opportunities and the education needed to land the perfect career. Our materials cover a wide range of professions, industries and degree programs, and are designed for people who want to choose, change or advance their careers. We also provide helpful resources and guides that address social issues, financial aid and other special interest in higher education. Information from LearnHowtoBecome.org has proudly been featured by more than 700 educational institutions.

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