Trout Unlimited

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Trout Unlimited

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News Article | April 18, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

GATLINBURG, Tenn., April 18, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Sugarlands Distilling Company is bringing music, spirits and outdoor competitions to the mountains of East Tennessee this fall with their inaugural Sugarlands MountainFest. Sugarlands MountainFest, a spirited celebration of the great outdoors, will take place from September 29 to October 1. For three days, fans will gather to enjoy live musical performances, competitive races, outdoor competitions, craft cocktails, award-winning spirits and brews—all in breathtaking mountains of East Tennessee.   "People have been coming here for generations, exploring the mountains in ways that renew their spirit," said festival director Brent Thompson. "We're producing Sugarlands MountainFest to celebrate life outside in one of the world's most visited natural destinations."   The Tennessee Whiskey Experience will precede the festival on September 28. Distillers from across Tennessee will offer samples of their craft whiskey & spirited cocktails.     From Friday to Sunday, more than 30 bands from across the country are scheduled to play during the inaugural festival, including Mandolin Orange, Elephant Revival, Driftwood, Yarn and Whiskey Shivers.  The live musical performances will be accented by races and outdoor competitions.   Running enthusiasts will be invited to participate in any of three scheduled foot races, including an uphill 5k. Cyclists will have a chance to participate in the "Tour De Smokies" DreamRide to benefit Dreambikes. Riders will travel through the national park's famed "Spur," then pedal their way over the hills of East Tennessee, eventually returning to Sugarlands MountainFest.   Fishing enthusiasts can compete in the Trout Unlimited (Great Smoky Mountain Chapter) One-Fly Tournament in the mountains streams around Gatlinburg, Tenn.   Sugarlands MountainFest is sure to have something for the whole family to enjoy including food trucks, crafts, and the world-class attractions of downtown Gatlinburg, Tenn.   For more information—or to purchase tickets—please visit www.sugarlandsmtnfest.com.


Kinross to donate water rights to conserve fish habitat in Yellowstone River watershed and conservation easement to protect important land used in elk migration JARDINE, MT--(Marketwired - August 17, 2017) - In the spirit of responsible mining and a strong commitment to environmental conservation, Kinross Gold U.S.A., Inc., Trout Unlimited and the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation announced today an agreement to protect and conserve important fish and wildlife habitat adjacent to Yellowstone National Park. As part of its remediation and reclamation plans for the Mineral Hill Mine, a subsidiary of Kinross donated water rights representing approximately 3 billion gallons of water to Trout Unlimited to permanently protect vital fish habitat in tributaries of the Yellowstone River. It also reached a conservation easement agreement with the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation to permanently protect a 549-acre land corridor used as an important elk migration route and scenic Yellowstone National Park viewshed. "Mining responsibly is an imperative at Kinross and guides decision-making at all of our properties," said J. Paul Rollinson, Kinross Gold President and CEO. "We are proud to partner with Trout Unlimited and the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation to achieve positive benefits for the environment and local community by protecting important fish and wildlife habitat in the Yellowstone area." "Last year's fish kill and emergency closure of the Yellowstone River underscored the importance of making our rivers more resilient. This agreement will help keep more water in the river, providing cooler temperatures in the height of summer and better habitat for fish and wildlife. It is great to see a company such as Kinross understand that healthy fisheries are the lifeblood of the West. Trout Unlimited is excited to see such a partnership provide lasting benefits to both the river and the communities that depends on it," said Chris Wood, Trout Unlimited President and CEO. "This project is a win-win for elk and elk country because it permanently protects a key migration corridor as well as important habitat for elk, deer and other wildlife," said David Allen, Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation President and CEO. "We appreciate the work of our partners in conserving the land's wildlife values and improving public access." The water rights donation and conservation easement were made by Kinross Gold U.S.A., Inc.'s wholly-owned subsidiary, TVX Mineral Hill, Inc. ("TVX"). The Mineral Hill Mine was operated by TVX until the mine closed in 1996. TVX became a subsidiary of Kinross Gold U.S.A., Inc. in 2003. Mining in the Mineral Hill region dates back to the 1860's, and many generations of Americans have benefited from the rich mineral endowment in the area. After the Mineral Hill Mine's closure, the Company's extensive reclamation activities earned the U.S. Bureau of Land Management's Hard Rock Mineral Environmental Award in 2011. Today, the responsible stewardship of the land has come full circle with this agreement, as fish and wildlife habitat conserved here will benefit future generations. To commemorate this conservation agreement, Yellowstone National Park Superintendent Dan Wenk will host an event today near Jardine, Montana at 1 p.m. MT. Montana Governor Steve Bullock, Deputy Secretary of the Department of the Interior David Bernhardt, Montana Senator Jon Tester, Montana Senator Steve Daines, and Congressman Greg Gianforte will attend the event and speak about the significance of this conservation agreement. Trout Unlimited is a non-profit organization with 300,000 members and supporters nationwide dedicated to conserving, protecting and restoring North America's coldwater fisheries and their watersheds. Founded in 1964, Montana Trout Unlimited is the only statewide grassroots organization dedicated solely to conserving and restoring coldwater fisheries. Montana Trout Unlimited is comprised of 13 chapters representing approximately 4,500 Trout Unlimited members. Founded over 30 years ago, fueled by hunters and a membership of more than 222,000 strong, RMEF has conserved more than 7.1 million acres for elk and other wildlife. RMEF also works to open and improve public access, fund and advocate for science-based resource management, and ensure the future of America's hunting heritage. Kinross is a senior gold mining company with mines and projects in the United States, Brazil, Russia, Mauritania, Chile and Ghana. Our focus is on delivering value based on the core principles of operational excellence, balance sheet strength, disciplined growth and responsible mining. Kinross maintains listings on the Toronto Stock Exchange (TSX: K) and the New York Stock Exchange ( : KGC).


News Article | October 2, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

ASHBURN, Va.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Telos® Corporation, a leading provider of continuous security solutions and services for the world’s most security-conscious organizations, was named the Trout Unlimited (TU) Corporate Conservation Partner of 2017. Since 2011, Telos has provided funding for TU’s Veterans Service Partnership (VSP), a program that helps veterans find hope and healing through fly fishing and conservation. “Through the support of TU’s Veterans Service Partnership, Telos is proud to support a program that provides an outlet to the veteran community that can help them navigate the physical and emotional wounds they incur during service to our country,” said John B. Wood, CEO and chairman, Telos. “Being recognized as the 2017 Corporate Conservation Partner is an honor, and we look forward to continuing our support for TU’s VSP for many years to come.” Trout Unlimited engages its extensive network of volunteers to introduce wounded and returning veterans to conservation work through fly fishing. TU chapters and partner organizations provide instruction, camaraderie and local networks of anglers to the veteran community around the country. TU’s Veterans Service Partnership also provides fishing retreats for veterans with physical and emotional scars, as well as family members grieving the loss of military loved ones. “Each year, Trout Unlimited honors a company that is uniquely dedicated to our mission and steadfastly supports our important work across the country,” said Chris Wood, president and CEO, Trout Unlimited. “Nearly a decade ago, my brother Emmett Wood, the EVP of marketing at Telos, and I hatched the Veterans Service Partnership over pizza and beer. From that evening Telos has been steadfast in support of our veterans and Trout Unlimited. They have been with us from the beginning and continue to help us expand and grow this truly important work to this day. We’re proud to recognize them as this year’s Corporate Conservation Partner.” To date, TU chapters across the country have helped nearly 7,000 wounded veterans, donating over 60,000 volunteer hours. “Our nation’s veterans and their families have served and sacrificed to protect our country and the freedoms we all enjoy,” said David Kumlien, VSP coordinator, Trout Unlimited. “The TU Veterans Service Partnership is our effort to honor that sacrifice by welcoming these service men and women and their families into our Trout Unlimited community, while providing them a meaningful way to continue to serve through conservation. With more than 200 local chapters serving thousands of veterans each year, the VSP program continues to grow and make a difference in the lives of our nation’s military family.” Telos received the award on September 29, during TU’s Volunteer Awards Banquet held at their annual meeting in Roanoke, Va. Past recipients include Tiffany & Co. Foundation, The Orvis Company, and Costa Del Mar. Telos Corporation empowers and protects the world’s most security-conscious organizations with solutions and services for continuous security assurance of individuals, systems and information. Telos’ offerings include cyber security solutions and services for IT risk management and information security; secure mobility to protect globally connected organizations; and identity management to establish trust in personnel and continuously monitor for insider threats. The company serves military, intelligence and civilian agencies of the federal government, allied nations and commercial organizations around the world. Telos is recognized as a leading cyber company, evidenced by a top 25 ranking on the global Cybersecurity 500 list. The company is a recipient of the prestigious James S. Cogswell Outstanding Industrial Security Achievement Award from the Defense Security Service (DSS), awarded to less than one percent of eligible organizations. For more information, visit www.telos.com and follow on Twitter @TelosNews. Trout Unlimited is the nation’s oldest and largest coldwater fisheries conservation organization dedicated to conserving, protecting and restoring North America’s trout and salmon and their watersheds. Trout Unlimited has 400 chapters and over 300,000 members and supporters.


News Article | February 24, 2017
Site: www.24-7pressrelease.com

COLUMBUS, OH, February 24, 2017-- Robert J. Holland has been included in Marquis Who's Who. As in all Marquis Who's Who biographical volumes, individuals profiled are selected on the basis of current reference value. Factors such as position, noteworthy accomplishments, visibility, and prominence in a field are all taken into account during the selection process.Now retired from an illustrious legal career during which he practiced banking, finance and estate planning law, Mr. Holland has more than 50 years of experience. After receiving a bachelor's degree from Yale University and a JD from The Ohio State University, he worked for Chester & Rose as an associate from 1963 until 1967. He then served as general counsel for BancOhio Financial and later became partner in Bodiker & Holland. From 1971 to 1985, Mr. Holland acted as general counsel for the Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission, which aims to encourage progression in the areas of transportation, housing, infrastructure and economic development. For 10 years, as an attorney for the city of Upper Arlington, he adhered to the highest standards of ethics and accountability in public service. He served as general counsel to Payments Central from its inception until he retired in May, 2003; Payments Central is an Ohio member of the National Automated Clearinghouse Association.Mr. Holland is a founder and former member of the board of directors of the Wellington School in Columbus. He was also president of the Central Ohio Transit Authority board of directors from 1971 to 1974. An active member of the legal community, he has been a member of the American Bar Association, the Ohio State Bar Association, and the Ethics Committee of the Columbus Bar Association, and chaired the latter organization's Law Institutes Committee. He is also affiliated with the International Food and Wine Society, Union League Club of Chicago, the Scioto Country Club and Trout Unlimited, as he enjoys fly fishing.In recognition of his commitment to professional and personal excellence, Mr. Holland was honored as one of Ten Outstanding Men by the Columbus Jaycees. He has been included in several editions of Who's Who in America, Who's Who in American Law, as well as the 37th edition of Who's Who in Finance and Business.About Marquis Who's Who :Since 1899, when A. N. Marquis printed the First Edition of Who's Who in America , Marquis Who's Who has chronicled the lives of the most accomplished individuals and innovators from every significant field of endeavor, including politics, business, medicine, law, education, art, religion and entertainment. Today, Who's Who in America remains an essential biographical source for thousands of researchers, journalists, librarians and executive search firms around the world. Marquis publications may be visited at the official Marquis Who's Who website at www.marquiswhoswho.com


News Article | December 16, 2016
Site: www.theguardian.com

We all have that one friend. The one, just like Leonardo DiCaprio, who likes to educate people about climate change and has gifted their own share of Before The Flood and Inconvenient Truth DVDs. This Christmas, you can show your environmentalist friend that you are listening by making a donation to WildEarth Guardians on their behalf. WildEarth started in 1989 to fight logging in New Mexico, but it has since expanded its efforts to protect and restore wildlife in the American West. Using your donation, the organization will plant native cottonwoods and willows at one of their river restoration sites. Each Hamilton (a $10 bill) will pay for one new tree. WildEarth will notify your friend about the donation by sending a personalized card. Alternative #1: A donation to the Natural Resources Defense Council Alternative #2: A donation to The Public Land Trust Shopping for teenagers is hard. Almost as difficult as having the birds and the bees talk. Why not kill two birds with one stone and subscribe your teen to Sex, Etc? Sex, Etc is a magazine by teens for teens, whose mission is to help improve sex education among America’s youth. The magazine comes out three times a year and addresses sex, relationships, pregnancy, STDs, birth control, sexual orientation and more. Published by Answer, a national sex education organization at Rutgers University in New Jersey, each issue costs just $5, or $15 for an annual subscription. Alternative #1: A donation to The Trevor Project Alternative #2: A pack of Conscious Step Socks Jetting around the world can be fun, but what’s even better is jetting around the world for a good cause. Sign up your wanderlust friend for a trip with Crooked Trails, which aims to make tourism “a positive force in the world”. Crooked Trails designs some of its trips around the world to offer travelers an immersion of the local culture by participating in a wide range of social and environmental projects. For example, its next trip to Cameroon will focus on women’s health and education. Participants will help build a local coffee house and meet the women’s groups who will help run it. Another organization that organizes trips with the purpose of improving communities is Habitat for Humanities. From January to September, Habitat has planned more than 50 trips to places like Brazil and Cambodia. Struggling to figure out what to get the feminist in your life? Look no further than Thistle Farms. All the company’s products – from handmade lotions and soaps to t-shirts and jewelry – are made by female survivors of prostitution, trafficking and addiction. A safe house set up by the Rev Becca Stevens brought together five survivors who went on to start Thistle Farms 20 years ago. Today, the organization employs about 50 survivors at its farm, cafe and studio, and helps employ more than 1,500 women globally. Thistle Farms also offers a residential program for women released from the Tennessee Prison for Women. Alternative #1: A donation to Dress for Success Alternative #2: A donation to Emily’s List There has been a lot of talk about politics in 2016, especially debates over the Bill of Rights and US government spending. The Sunlight Foundation tracks the flow of money into politics and how the government spends taxpayers’ money. Started ten years ago, the nonprofit, nonpartisan organization set out to make government more transparent and hold it accountable. The foundation tackles government at all levels: local, state, federal and international. The foundation is also tracking comments and actions by president-elect Donald Trump that signal a conflict of interest between running his business and the government. Make a donation to the Sunlight Foundation in the name of the constitutional defender in your life. Alternative #1: A donation to the ACLU Alternative #2: A donation to the American Constitution Society With nearly 500 endangered groups of animals in the US at the moment, consider donating to the Center for Biological Diversity on behalf of the animal lover in your life. The center uses science, law and media outreach to fight for “a future for all species, great and small”. It incorporates videos, ads, apps and even endangered species condoms in public awareness campaigns. It creates memorable slogans to accompany the artwork on the condoms: “Before it gets any hotter, think of the sea otter”, “Wrap with care, save the polar bear” and “For the sake of the horned lizard, slow down love wizard”. A shirt or a fly fishing accessory from Casting for Recovery could be the perfect gift for the sportswoman or sportsman in your life. All proceeds from sales are used to fund fly fishing retreats for women with breast cancer. Since launching in 1998, the nonprofit has organized more than 550 retreats. In 2016 alone, it held 45 retreats in 42 states, serving more than 600 women. Alternatively, you could just make a donation to Casting for Recovery. A $20 donation buys fishing flies for one retreat, while a $100 donation buys healthy meals for one woman. Alternative #1: A membership to Trout Unlimited Alternative #2: A membership to the Wilderness Society Anywhere between 3% to 5% of Americans consider themselves vegetarian. If the vegetarian in your life has a soft spot for farm animals, you should consider sponsoring a farm animal at the Farm Sanctuary. Not only does sponsorship provide food and shelter for a needy farm animal, but the sanctuary, which has several locations throughout the US, also allows sponsors to visit their special farm friend during its visitors season. Sponsoring a chicken will set you back $120 a year. It would be $180 a year for a duck, goose or turkey and $300 a year for a goat or sheep. While a one-time donation of $20 is not enough to sponsor an animal, it does come with a one-year membership to the sanctuary. Alternative #1: A donation to Farm Animal Rights Movement Alternative #2: A donation to Compassion Over Killing On behalf of a loved one who can always spare change for the homeless, make a contribution to the Empowerment Plan. The organization offers ways to sponsor food, clothing, shelter and transportation for the homeless. A $100 donation, for example, pays for a coat that can turn into a sleeping bag. The Empowerment Plan hires single parents out of shelters to work as seamstresses making the coats. According to its website, it has employed 34 homeless people and handed out more than 15,000 coats since 2012. Alternative #1: A donation to Feeding America Alternative #2: A donation to Coalition for the Homeless This holiday, buy your child a plush animal that can help another tiny human. St Jude Children’s Research Hospital is selling a plush puppy named after a cancer patient, Abigail. Each puppy costs $15 and all proceeds after expenses will be used to further St Jude’s mission of treating childhood cancer and other life-threatening diseases free of charge. The hospital also sells other items from its online gift shop: there’s Kiara the tiger cat, a selection of clothes and sketch pads. Alternatively, why not give the little man or woman in your life a gift made from recycled materials? Vawn and Mike Gray make recycled glass nightlights with endearing details in their Cape Coral, Florida studio. They use recycled glass and an energy-efficient kiln to create fun, colorful pieces for children. Independent, local journalism is critical for keeping elected officials accountable and connecting people within a community. Consider a local newspaper subscription for your news junkie friend. (Or, ahem, the Guardian.) If you aren’t sure about the subscription options, enter your friend’s zipcode here to find out if they are eligible. (It is best to subscribe to newspapers straight from their websites, however.) A good alternative to a local newspaper is a subscription to a regional magazine such as Boston Magazine, Texas Monthly, Texas Tribune, Chicago Magazine or Our State, a North Carolina magazine. Throw in a few good DVDs about journalism, too. Spotlight, on the Boston Globe’s investigation of a sexual abuse coverup within the Catholic church, is a good one. So is Network, an oldie from 1976 about a fictional TV news program that uses entertainment to drive ratings. Alternative #1: A donation to the Committee to Protect Journalists Alternative #2: A donation to the Freedom of the Press Foundation Holding a civil debate with conservative relatives can be so challenging during the holidays. Let counter-programming do the work instead. Sign them up for a subscription to their local NPR station and ask them to give its content a chance. Want to avoid politics? You can sign them up for nonpartisan collections of stories on NPR, such as the dog tales or cat tales. After all, who doesn’t love a good animal story? Delight your book lover friends by introducing them to tomes from a small publishing house. Almost 40% of books are published by five major publishing houses. Small, independent presses are an important source for a greater variety of voices and perspectives. Here are a few great small publishers who have fabulous books in fiction, nonfiction and poetry: Graywolf Press, Red Hen Press, Inkshares, and Melville House. Books from small, independent co-op bookstores are also a great gift idea. Try Antigone Books in Tucson, Arizona, which also has the benefit of being 100% solar-powered; Powell’s in Portland, Oregon; and the famous City Lights in San Francisco, California. Alternative #1: A donation to the American Library Association Alternative #2: A donation to United Through Reading


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

True to its mission to protect and sustain the coastal area it calls home, Pelican Brewing Company invites brew lovers to ‘drink a beer and save a fish.’ A portion of proceeds from every barrel of Pelican’s new Five Fin west coast pilsner sold will be donated to the Salmon Superhighway—an unprecedented effort to restore access to almost 180 miles of blocked habitat throughout six major salmon and steelhead rivers of Oregon’s North Coast. Inspired by the crystal clear waters of the six Tillamook County rivers and named for the five ocean-going species of fish benefitting from the salmon recovery effort , Five Fin is a uniquely ‘west coast’ take on the classic Pilsner beer style. Bright and zippy with a bold hoppy flavor and aroma, Five Fin is crafted with a unique blend of Cascade and Sterling hops from the Pacific Northwest and Mandarina Bavaria hops from Germany. The new pilsner marries the hop-driven flavors of tangerine, pineapple, and lemon zest with classic spicy, floral notes, all balanced against a toasty malt character: “We wanted to create a beer that would successfully support this unique restoration project—when we think about salmon, we think of the clean, cold, crisp flowing rivers here and imagined Five Fin to mirror that,” says Jim Prinzing, CEO, Pelican Brewing Company. “We love pilsners and we love American hops and this beer brings those two elements together in a bold, refreshing way.” The new beer will be available the first week of October in the grocery craft beer aisle in 6-packs, 12 oz and 22 oz bottles; 50 liter kegs and 1/6th barrels are also available for on-premise pours. Pelican leading private donations to the 93-project campaign The Salmon Superhighway project is a strategic and intensive effort across a six-river landscape to reconnect fish populations with the habitat they need to navigate and survive. Started in 2014, the $35.8M campaign is expected to run through 2024 to improve the habitat for salmon in 93 different locations throughout Tillamook County. Hundreds of barriers in streams still create bottlenecks throughout Oregon's coastal watersheds—most are problem culverts at road crossings that contribute to flooding and road damage, along with some small dams and tide gates. Minimizing these impacts across a major landscape will come with significant, lasting benefit to fish and people, now and into the future. “Pelican Brewing Company is a valued leader in our effort to raise awareness and funding to protect salmon in Tillamook County—which impacts all of us at some level,” says Terry Turner, Oregon Council Chair, Trout Unlimited. “We hope Pelican’s creative funding strategy will encourage other companies and organizations to join this very important salmon habitat restoration effort.” Pelican is participating as a sponsor and donor of this ambitious and unique community partnership to design and construct culvert replacement to create healthy upstream fish habitats, reduce chronic flooding, improve recreation opportunities and stimulate the local economy. Other partners include a broad range of state and federal agencies, local business and agriculture, and local watershed councils. For a complete list of partners, please check the project website at: http://www.salmonsuperhwy.org “We know we are more than lucky to live and work in a place as beautiful as Tillamook County, and at Pelican we don’t take our environment for granted,” says Mary Jones, c0-founder and c0-owner of Pelican Brewing Company. “Pelican has long invested both time and money in programs designed to protect this beautiful area. Among other environmental and sustainability initiatives, we are proud to support the Salmon Superhighway and encourage the private business community to join us in this important endeavor.” For more information on the Salmon Superhighway watch this short video. Born at the Beach Pelican was born at the beach 20 years ago as a small, stand alone brewpub in a small town on the Oregon coast—Pacific City. Pacific City is still a small town, but with consistent growth and demand for its products, Pelican sales are up more than 500% from 3,500 barrels in 2013 to 18,000 barrels this year. The company recently doubled its brewing and bottling capacity at its Tillamook facility and opened a new brewpub in Cannon Beach. Pelican also recently won a bronze medal at the World Brew Cup℠ and eight medals including Champion Medium International Brewery at the Australian International Beer Awards. About Pelican Brewing Company Pelican Brewing Company was founded in 1996 by Jeff Schons and Mary Jones in Pacific City with Oregon's only oceanfront brewpub. Celebrating its 20th year, the brewing company has created masterpieces like Kiwanda Cream Ale, India Pelican Ale, MacPelican’s Scottish Ale, Tsunami Stout and Doryman’s Dark. With the vision, creativity and brewing expertise of founding brewmaster Darron Welch, Pelican Brewing has won over 300 awards including the 2014 World Beer Cup© Champion Small Brewing Company and Brewmaster of the Year. Pelican Brewing currently distributes 22oz bottles, 12oz bottles in 6-packs, a new mixed 12-pack, and 50 liter and 20 liter kegs via a network of distributors in Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Nevada, Utah, Hawaii and Vermont. The company operates brewing and brewpub facilities in Pacific City, Tillamook and Cannon Beach. Media Note: Site tours of Salmon Superhighway projects underway are open to the media. Email or call Terry Turner at turnernt(at)comcast(dot)net or 503-804-9868.


With the stroke of a pen yesterday, President Donald Trump began the process of attempting to rollback what’s become known as the Waters of the United States rule, which protects fish and wildlife and the quality of our nation’s rivers, streams and wetlands. Maybe it’s sheer coincidence, but rescinding the Waters of the U.S. rule would also happen to help some of Trump’s business interests. The only good news for sportsmen and women: According to many experts, the process of rolling back this rule could take many years. The Waters of the U.S. rule was passed in May of 2015. The rule clarified the federal government’s role in protecting headwaters and wetlands under the Clean Water Act, and was widely greeted as big win for those who like to hunt and fish, and for fans of clean drinking water. President Trump had a different take. “The EPA’s regulators were putting people out of jobs by the hundreds of thousands, and regulations and permits started treating our wonderful small farmers and small businesses as if they were a major industrial polluter,” he said at yesterday’s signing. “They treated them horribly. Horribly.” And he claimed that doing away with the rule would be a win-win: “We're going to free up our country, and it's going be done in a very environmental and positive environmental way, I will tell you that, but create millions of jobs.” Sportsmen’s groups disagreed with Trump’s assessment. Trout Unlimited, the National Wildlife Foundation, the American Fly Fishing Trade Association, the Izaak Walton League of America, the Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership and Backcountry Hunters and Anglers, in a joint statement, said that if the Waters of the U.S. rule is rescinded, 60 percent of U.S. streams and 20 million acres of wetlands would lose the protection of the Clean Water Act, a situation they described as “a tragedy for fish and wildlife, hunting and fishing, and clean water.” The groups point out that clean water and wetlands are the backbone of the $50 billion-a-year sportfishing industry, which sustains 828,000 jobs, and that 83% of sportsmen and women were in favor of the 2015 rule. Trump’s relationship with sportsmen and women has been muddled at best. He courted their vote in an interview with Field & Stream magazine last year, saying: “This is magnificent land. And we have to be great stewards of this land. And the hunters do such a great job—I mean, the hunters and the fishermen and all of the different people that use that land.” And the appointment of Ryan Zinke as the head of the Department of the Interior was supported by sportsmen’s groups because the former Montana congressman appears to be against the selling off of public lands. But none of this matters at all if our waters and wetlands are not protected. And one wonders where Donald Trump, Jr., is in all of this. Trump, Jr.—an angler and hunter—fishes public water in New York State’s Catskill Mountains area, precisely the type of water that could be adversely affected by the undoing of the Waters of the U.S. rule. Trump, Jr., styled himself as the new administration's true champion of sportsmen and women. In an interview with Wide Open Spaces the day after the election, Trump, Jr., was asked why the outdoorsmen of America should support a Trump administration. His answer: Perhaps Trump, Jr., hasn’t been loud enough. Or perhaps, for the president and his son, their business concerns trump those for fishing and hunting and the environment. Bloomberg News reported today that the golf courses in the U.S. owned by the Trump Organization would benefit from the rollback of the Waters of the U.S. rule.


News Article | December 11, 2016
Site: phys.org

The removal of the 11-foot-high Hogansburg Dam this fall is the latest in the tribe's decades-long struggle to restore territory defiled by industrial pollution, beginning in the 1980s with PCBs and heavy metals from nearby General Motors, Alcoa and Reynolds Metal plants, a cleanup under federal oversight that's nearly complete. The St. Regis River project is the first removal of an operating hydroelectric dam in New York state and the nation's first decommissioning of a federally licensed dam by a Native American tribe, federal officials say. Paired with the recent success of North Dakota's Standing Rock Sioux in rerouting a pipeline they feared could threaten their water supply, the dam's removal underscores longstanding concern over the health of tribal lands. "We look at this not only as reclaiming the resources and our land, but also taking back this scar on our landscape that's a constant reminder of those days of exploitation," said Tony David, water resources manager for the St. Regis Mohawk Reservation, which the Mohawks call Akwesasne. The former industrial site will become a focal point in the Mohawks' cultural restoration program, funded by a $19 million settlement in 2013 with GM, Alcoa and Reynolds for pollution of tribal fishing and hunting grounds along the St. Lawrence River. The program partners young apprentices with tribal elders to preserve the Mohawk language and pass on traditional practices such as hunting, fishing, trapping, basket-making, horticulture and medicine. Standing on the rocky edge of a shallow, rushing river that was stilled by a 330-foot-long concrete dam until backhoes demolished it in September, David said a new park will be built to showcase Mohawk artwork where the powerhouse once hummed. On the opposite bank, a nature park will replace a treacherous tangle of industrial equipment, decrepit structures and trash. "We're transforming it from a dangerous no-go zone to someplace that's inviting and beautiful," said Eric Sunday, an apprentice in the cultural restoration program. "It creates opportunities to get people together, showcase skills, get more knowledge about our traditional ways and just appreciate nature." The dam, on former Mohawk land adjacent to the sprawling reservation, was in the early stages of federal relicensing five years ago when owner Brookfield Renewable Energy decided it wasn't economically feasible to make necessary upgrades. Seizing an opportunity to recover some treasured territory, the Mohawks became a co-licensee and took the lead in the decommissioning, working with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the state Department of Environmental Conservation and Trout Unlimited. The dam removal re-established the river's connection with the St. Lawrence River and opened nearly 275 miles of stream habitat to migratory fish, including American eel, lake sturgeon, Atlantic salmon and walleye. "The next town upstream was known by the Mohawks as 'Place of the Salmon,'" David said. "Before salmon were extirpated from this river, people would be out in the shallows netting or spearing them to feed their families." The project is part of a larger movement that has dismantled almost 250 dams across the country since 2012, according to the conservation group American Rivers. Most have been small dams no longer useful, but environmental groups and Indian tribes in the Pacific Northwest are pressing for removal of large hydroelectric dams to restore salmon runs. The Mohawk dam removal was not without controversy in the tribal community. Will Clute, a Mohawk fishing guide, said he and some other fishermen worried spawning grounds downstream would be buried in sediment from behind the dam. When a dam was removed on the nearby Salmon River 10 years ago, some downstream habitat was buried under several feet of muck. "We will be monitoring the impact on downstream habitat," David said. "What we've learned from all the dam removals across the country is that a lot of the negative impacts are short-term. The river will flush and fix itself. You need at least five to 10 years to see how it will end up." Explore further: Herring spawn in NY tributary for 1st time in 85 years


News Article | November 1, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

The Orvis Phoenix retail store will celebrate its Grand Opening November 4 – 6 at 2011 East Camelback Road. The store is relocating from its previous Scottsdale address, and customers will find all the same staff on hand to meet their needs. As part of its commitment to protecting the environment, Orvis will donate a portion of all proceeds from Grand Opening Weekend sales to the White Mountains Lakes Foundation and the Zane Grey chapter of Trout Unlimited. Throughout the weekend customers can enter a drawing for a $500 Orvis Gift Card, and receive a complimentary reusable Orvis Tote Bag while supplies last. On Saturday guests will enjoy free refreshments catered by Chef Michael DeMaria from 11 am to 2 pm. The Sonoran Dogs will provide live music from noon to 3 pm. Commemorative Orvis Phoenix Pint Glasses will be distributed while supplies last. While Orvis has enjoyed great success in Scottsdale, relocating to Phoenix represents an opportunity to be closer to the Central Business District. “This is a much more convenient location for a large concentration of our customers,” said Orvis’ Director of Real Estate Jason Williams. “Orvis fans will find the new store to be a more contemporary design, with high ceilings, large format imagery, and the kind of natural building materials that appeal to our customers’ love of the outdoors. We greatly look forward to sharing this beautiful new space with our new neighbors and old friends.” About The Orvis Company: Founded in 1856, Orvis pioneered the mail order industry in the United States, operates more than 80 retail stores in the U.S and the U.K., including its Flagship store in Manchester, VT; and maintains a network of over 400 dealers worldwide. The oldest continuously operating catalog company in the country, Orvis is the premier outfitter of outdoor adventures. A leading corporate steward for the environment, Orvis contributes 5% of its pre-tax profits to protecting nature. Learn more at http://www.orvis.com.


Wenger S.J.,Trout Unlimited | Olden J.D.,University of Washington
Methods in Ecology and Evolution | Year: 2012

1.Ecologists have long sought to distinguish relationships that are general from those that are idiosyncratic to a narrow range of conditions. Conventional methods of model validation and selection assess in- or out-of-sample prediction accuracy but do not assess model generality or transferability, which can lead to overestimates of performance when predicting in other locations, time periods or data sets. 2.We propose an intuitive method for evaluating transferability based on techniques currently in use in the area of species distribution modelling. The method involves cross-validation in which data are assigned non-randomly to groups that are spatially, temporally or otherwise distinct, thus using heterogeneity in the data set as a surrogate for heterogeneity among data sets. 3.We illustrate the method by applying it to distribution modelling of brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis Mitchill) and brown trout (Salmo trutta Linnaeus) in western United States. We show that machine-learning techniques such as random forests and artificial neural networks can produce models with excellent in-sample performance but poor transferability, unless complexity is constrained. In our example, traditional linear models have greater transferability. 4.We recommend the use of a transferability assessment whenever there is interest in making inferences beyond the data set used for model fitting. Such an assessment can be used both for validation and for model selection and provides important information beyond what can be learned from conventional validation and selection techniques. © 2012 The Authors. Methods in Ecology and Evolution © 2012 British Ecological Society.

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