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News Article | May 17, 2017
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

When people develop a respiratory infection, recovery from their illness leaves behind an immunological memory that influences how they will respond to later infections. In a new study, researchers demonstrate for the first time that recovery from bacterial pneumonia changes the tissue that was infected, seeding the lungs with immune cells called resident memory T (TRM) cells. Differences in the numbers and activities of these lung TRM cells may be responsible for the increased susceptibility of young children and older adults to pneumonia and manipulating these cells may provide novel treatment options for curing pneumonia. The study appears in the journal Mucosal Immunology. Worldwide, pneumonia remains a serious public health burden. Each year more than one million children under the age of five die from pneumonia and associated complications. In the U.S., pneumonia is the most common reason for the hospitalization of children and accounts for nearly half of the infectious disease-related hospitalizations and deaths of older adults. To model the typical experience of most children, an experimental model received a series of mild and non-life threatening respiratory infections. A control model received sterile saline instead of infections. When compared to the control model, those with prior respiratory infections were profoundly resistant to severe (life-threatening) pneumonia. "Our study suggests that respiratory bacterial infections during childhood establish a novel type of antibacterial immunity," explained corresponding author Joseph Mizgerd, ScD, professor of medicine, microbiology and biochemistry at Boston University School of Medicine. "The TRM cells left behind after prior infections are more broadly effective than vaccine-generated immunity, providing protection against a wider spectrum of microbes that can infect the lungs." Young children and older adults are highly susceptible to pneumonia, but the factors that are responsible for preventing pneumonia in young healthy adults are still not understood. "We have only modest abilities to prevent or cure many of the infections that cause pneumonia. Defining the protective mechanisms normally preventing lung infections in most young healthy adults will lead to tests identifying who is susceptible and new approaches for preventing and treating the infections," added Mizgerd.


News Article | May 17, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

(Boston) -- When people develop a respiratory infection, recovery from their illness leaves behind an immunological memory that influences how they will respond to later infections. In a new study, researchers demonstrate for the first time that recovery from bacterial pneumonia changes the tissue that was infected, seeding the lungs with immune cells called resident memory T (TRM) cells. Differences in the numbers and activities of these lung TRM cells may be responsible for the increased susceptibility of young children and older adults to pneumonia and manipulating these cells may provide novel treatment options for curing pneumonia. The study appears in the journal Mucosal Immunology. Worldwide, pneumonia remains a serious public health burden. Each year more than one million children under the age of five die from pneumonia and associated complications. In the U.S., pneumonia is the most common reason for the hospitalization of children and accounts for nearly half of the infectious disease-related hospitalizations and deaths of older adults. To model the typical experience of most children, an experimental model received a series of mild and non-life threatening respiratory infections. A control model received sterile saline instead of infections. When compared to the control model, those with prior respiratory infections were profoundly resistant to severe (life-threatening) pneumonia. "Our study suggests that respiratory bacterial infections during childhood establish a novel type of antibacterial immunity," explained corresponding author Joseph Mizgerd, ScD, professor of medicine, microbiology and biochemistry at Boston University School of Medicine. "The TRM cells left behind after prior infections are more broadly effective than vaccine-generated immunity, providing protection against a wider spectrum of microbes that can infect the lungs." Young children and older adults are highly susceptible to pneumonia, but the factors that are responsible for preventing pneumonia in young healthy adults are still not understood. "We have only modest abilities to prevent or cure many of the infections that cause pneumonia. Defining the protective mechanisms normally preventing lung infections in most young healthy adults will lead to tests identifying who is susceptible and new approaches for preventing and treating the infections," added Mizgerd. Funding for this study was provided by research grants from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to J.P.M. (R01 AI115053, R01 HL068153, R01 HL079392, R35 HL135756), L.J.Q. (R01 HL111449) and M.R.J. (R01 HL104053), as well as by the NIH training grants (T32 HL007035, T32 AI007309).


News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Building Engines, the commercial real estate industry’s innovation leader for on-demand property management operations software, today announced the release of its enhanced tenant services mobile app, “The Hive.” Building on the success of Building Engines’ previous tenant mobile app, The Hive enhances the tenant experience through improved convenience and customer service delivery. With this new mobile enhancement, commercial real estate (CRE) managers will improve tenant engagement while increasing satisfaction and retention. Powered by The Hive’s tenant-centered mobile capabilities, tenants can register visitors, submit service requests, review and approve estimates, as well as receive urgent updates and promotional broadcast messages from building management - anywhere, at any time. “Commercial property managers know that an improved tenant experience and deeper tenant engagement lead to increased satisfaction and higher tenant retention; however, only 20 percent of them believe they have the necessary tools to increase retention,” said Jody Saarmaa, Vice President, Product Management of Building Engines. “Our goal with The Hive is to give managers those tools. By empowering their tenants with greater visibility and control over their working environment through anywhere, anytime access to Building Engines’ tenant-facing capabilities, we’re confident that building managers will enhance tenant engagement, increase satisfaction and, ultimately, improve tenant retention.” The Building Engines 2016 Tenant Relationship Management (TRM) Survey Benchmark Report revealed that 54% of CRE professionals believe that modern property communication tools, such as mobile apps and online work order systems, increase tenant satisfaction. The report also confirmed that giving tenants mobile tools to identify problems and access resources tops CRE professionals’ wish lists. The Hive by Building Engines Provides New Tools for Stronger Tenant Relationships The Hive provides tenants and their building managers with a modern, mobile means to instantly communicate with management, address building issues and access resources whenever they may need them and wherever they may be. It includes new features that enable CRE professionals to improve tenant satisfaction and build stronger tenant relationships, including: The Hive takes the hassle out of managing a consumer-grade tenant mobile app. The powerful, free app is integrated with the rest of the Building Engines suite of functions, and is updated automatically to ensure quality. To help drive adoption, Building Engines provides easy-to-use promotional tools. The Hive is available immediately for Apple and Android devices at no charge to tenants whose property managers use Building Engines property management software. Tenant users can download the free app from the Apple App Store and the Google Play store. Building Engines is a cloud-based provider of property management software for progressive operations teams at commercial office, medical, retail and industrial real estate properties. Our web and mobile applications seamlessly connect property management teams with the activities, data and insights they need to improve operational efficiency, mitigate risk, improve tenant satisfaction and engagement and make more informed operational decisions. Clients of Building Engines include many of the leading public REITs, private owner/managers and third-party management firms in the United States and Canada. For more information about Building Engines, please visit: http://www.buildingengines.com. Android and Google Play are trademarks of Google Inc. Apple and App Store are trademarks of Apple Inc.


News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

Tenth annual IMPACT conference showcases new digital technologies revolutionizing human resources and the world of work HORSHAM, PA--(Marketwired - May 9, 2017) - Phenom People, the leader in Talent Relationship Marketing, today announced it will be exhibiting and unveiling new product features during IMPACT 2017. The Bersin by Deloitte event will take place May 22-25 at The Diplomat Resort & Spa in Hollywood, Fla. "We are excited to be a part of IMPACT 2017 and look forward to showing off our latest features to the HR and talent leaders attending the conference," said Mahe Bayireddi, CEO at Phenom People. "We are making huge advancements in the talent acquisition space, and we're thrilled to continue innovating and disrupting the way organizations attract, engage, nurture and convert top talent." The Phenom People Talent Relationship Marketing (TRM) Cloud Platform continues on a path of innovation and disruption in the talent acquisition space, transforming the way people search for jobs and how phenomenal companies find top talent. At IMPACT 2017, Phenom People will highlight the latest version of the Phenom People TRM Cloud Platform, which includes the following features: IMPACT is Bersin by Deloitte's annual research-based executive conference for HR, learning and talent executives and their teams. Themed "Unleashing the Power of Digital: A New World for HR," IMPACT 2017 will focus on the ways HR is responding to massive disruptions caused by the latest technologies, an explosion in analytics and artificial intelligence and changing definitions of work, workforces and worker expectations. It will also look at how these changes are driving a fundamental shift in the way leaders manage, guide and operate their organizations. About Phenom People Phenom People, the leader in Talent Relationship Marketing, helps companies attract phenomenal talent through personalized digital experience. The Phenom People Talent Relationship Marketing platform automates the complex process of driving awareness, interest, engagement, and acquisition for qualified talent. Phenom People helps some of the largest brands in the world attract phenomenal talent including AMN Healthcare, Citrix, Deloitte, General Motors, Hershey, Informatica and IPG Media. To learn more about Talent Relationship Marketing, please visit www.phenompeople.com.


Fischer R.,Fraunhofer Institute for Molecular Biology and Applied Ecology | Fischer R.,RWTH Aachen | Schillberg S.,Fraunhofer Institute for Molecular Biology and Applied Ecology | Buyel J.F.,Fraunhofer Institute for Molecular Biology and Applied Ecology | Twyman R.M.,TRM Ltd
Current Pharmaceutical Design | Year: 2013

Many different plant-based systems have been used to produce recombinant pharmaceutical proteins but only a small number have made the leap from an experimental platform to a viable commercial process. This reflects a combination of factors, principally the technical issues that must be addressed to achieve competitive performance, the economic principles that need to be satisfied to ensure manufacturing processes are financially viable and sustainable, and the regulatory demands that must be met to ensure that pharmaceuticals manufactured in plants are safe, efficacious and meet the quality standards demanded by the regulators. With the recent approval of the first plant-derived recombinant pharmaceutical protein designated for human use, we are now entering a new era in which plants not only meet all the demands of a commercial pharmaceutical manufacturing process but also provide unique benefits that allow the displacement of established platform technologies in niche markets. In this article, we consider the commercial aspects of molecular farming, specifically those required to make plants more competitive and attractive to industry. © 2013 Bentham Science Publishers.


Paul M.J.,St George's, University of London | Teh A.Y.H.,St George's, University of London | Twyman R.M.,TRM Ltd | Ma J.K.-C.,St George's, University of London
Current Pharmaceutical Design | Year: 2013

Four major developments have taken place in the world of Molecular Pharming recently. In the USA, the DARPA initiative challenged plant biotechnology companies to develop strategies for the large-scale manufacture of influenza vaccines, resulting in a successful Phase I clinical trial; in Europe the Pharma-Planta academic consortium gained regulatory approval for a plant-derived monoclonal antibody and completed a first-in-human phase I clinical trial; the Dutch pharmaceutical company Synthon acquired the assets of Biolex Therapeutics, an established Molecular Pharming company with several clinical candidates produced in their proprietary LEX system based on aquatic plants; and finally, the Israeli biotechnology company Protalix Biotherapeutics won FDA approval for the commercial release of a recombinant form of the enzyme glucocerebrosidase produced in carrot cells, the first plant biotechnology-derived biopharmaceutical in the world approved for the market. Commercial momentum is gathering pace with additional candidates now undergoing or awaiting approval for phase III clinical trials. Filling the product pipeline is vital to establish commercial sustainability, and the selection of appropriate target products for Molecular Pharming will be a critical factor. An interesting feature of the four stories outlined above is that they span the use of very different platform technologies addressing different types of molecules which aim to satisfy distinct market demands. In each case, Molecular Pharming was an economically and technically suitable approach, but this decisionmaking process is not necessarily straightforward. Although the various technologies available to Molecular Pharming are broad ranging and flexible, competing technologies are better established, so there needs to be a compelling reason to move into plants. It is most unlikely that plant biotechnology will be the answer for the whole biologics field. In this article, we discuss the current plant biotechnology approaches that appear to hold the greatest promise and in doing so attempt to define the product areas that are most likely to benefit from different Molecular Pharming technologies. © 2013 Bentham Science Publishers.


Twyman R.M.,TRM Ltd | Schillberg S.,Fraunhofer Institute for Molecular Biology and Applied Ecology | Fischer R.,Fraunhofer Institute for Molecular Biology and Applied Ecology | Fischer R.,RWTH Aachen
Current Pharmaceutical Design | Year: 2013

The production of recombinant pharmaceutical proteins in plants is entering a new phase with the recent approval of recombinant glucocerebrosidase produced in carrot cells and the successful production of clinical-grade proteins in diverse plant-based production platforms. In the long journey from concept to product, the field of molecular farming has faced technical and economic hurdles, many reflecting the initially limited productivity of plants compared to established platforms such as mammalian cells. This challenge has been met by innovative research aiming to increase recombinant protein yields and maximize the economic benefits of plants. Research has focused on increasing the intrinsic yield capability of plants by optimizing expression construct design, and also on novel strategies to avoid epigenetic silencing and environmental effects on protein accumulation. In this article, we discuss the diverse approaches that have been used to increase the productivity of plant-based platforms for the production of recombinant pharmaceutical proteins and consider future opportunities to maximize the potential of plants and increase their competitiveness outside niche markets. © 2013 Bentham Science Publishers.


Schillberg S.,Fraunhofer Institute for Molecular Biology and Applied Ecology | Schillberg S.,Justus Liebig University | Raven N.,Fraunhofer Institute for Molecular Biology and Applied Ecology | Fischer R.,Fraunhofer Institute for Molecular Biology and Applied Ecology | And 3 more authors.
Current Pharmaceutical Design | Year: 2013

Plants have been used for more than 20 years to produce recombinant proteins but only recently has the focus shifted away from proof-of-principle studies (i.e. is my protein expressed and is it functional?) to a serious consideration of the requirements for sustainable productivity and the regulatory approval of pharmaceutical products (i.e. is my protein safe, is it efficacious, and does the product and process comply with regulatory guidelines?). In this context, plant tissue and cell suspension cultures are ideal production platforms whose potential has been demonstrated using diverse pharmaceutical proteins. Typically, cell/tissue cultures are grown in containment under defined conditions, allowing process controls to regulate growth and product formation, thus ensuring regulatory compliance. Recombinant proteins can also be secreted to the culture medium, facilitating recovery and subsequent purification because cells contain most of the contaminating proteins and can be removed from the culture broth. Downstream processing costs are therefore lower compared to whole plant systems, balancing the higher costs of the fermentation equipment. In this article, we compare different approaches for the production of valuable proteins in plant cell suspension and tissue cultures, describing the advantages and disadvantages as well as challenges that must be overcome to make this platform commercially viable. We also present novel strategies for system and process optimization, helping to increase yields and scalability. © 2013 Bentham Science Publishers.


Vamvaka E.,University of Lleida | Twyman R.M.,TRM Ltd | Christou P.,University of Lleida | Christou P.,Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies | Capell T.,University of Lleida
Biotechnology Advances | Year: 2014

The population of sub-Saharan Africa is at risk from multiple, poverty-related endemic diseases. HIV and malaria are the most prevalent, but they disproportionately affect different groups of people, i.e. HIV predominantly affects sexually-active adults whereas malaria has a greater impact on children and pregnant women. Nevertheless, there is a significant geographical and epidemiological overlap which results in bidirectional and synergistic interactions with important consequences for public health. The immunosuppressive effects of HIV increase the risk of infection when individuals are exposed to malaria parasites and also the severity of malaria symptoms. Similarly, acute malaria can induce a temporary increase in the HIV viral load. HIV is associated with a wide range of opportunistic infections that can be misdiagnosed as malaria, resulting in the wasteful misuse of antimalarial drugs and a failure to address the genuine cause of the disease. There is also a cumulative risk of toxicity when antiretroviral and antimalarial drugs are given to the same patients. Synergistic approaches involving the control of malaria as a strategy to fight HIV/AIDS and vice versa are therefore needed in co-endemic areas. Plant biotechnology has emerged as a promising approach to tackle poverty-related diseases because plant-derived drugs and vaccines can be produced inexpensively in developing countries and may be distributed using agricultural infrastructure without the need for a cold chain. Here we explore some of the potential contributions of plant biotechnology and its integration into broader multidisciplinary public health programs to combat the two diseases in developing countries. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.


Buyel J.F.,RWTH Aachen | Buyel J.F.,Fraunhofer Institute for Molecular Biology and Applied Ecology | Twyman R.M.,TRM Ltd | Fischer R.,RWTH Aachen | Fischer R.,Fraunhofer Institute for Molecular Biology and Applied Ecology
Biotechnology Advances | Year: 2015

Plants offer the tantalizing prospect of low-cost automated manufacturing processes for biopharmaceutical proteins, but several challenges must be addressed before such goals are realized and the most significant hurdles are found during downstream processing (DSP). In contrast to the standardized microbial and mammalian cell platforms embraced by the biopharmaceutical industry, there are many different plant-based expression systems vying for attention, and those with the greatest potential to provide inexpensive biopharmaceuticals are also the ones with the most significant drawbacks in terms of DSP. This is because the most scalable plant systems are based on the expression of intracellular proteins in whole plants. The plant tissue must therefore be disrupted to extract the product, challenging the initial DSP steps with an unusually high load of both particulate and soluble contaminants. DSP platform technologies can accelerate and simplify process development, including centrifugation, filtration, flocculation, and integrated methods that combine solid-liquid separation, purification and concentration, such as aqueous two-phase separation systems. Protein tags can also facilitate these DSP steps, but they are difficult to transfer to a commercial environment and more generic, flexible and scalable strategies to separate target and host cell proteins are preferable, such as membrane technologies and heat/pH precipitation. In this context, clarified plant extracts behave similarly to the feed stream from microbes or mammalian cells and the corresponding purification methods can be applied, as long as they are adapted for plant-specific soluble contaminants such as the superabundant protein RuBisCO. Plant-derived pharmaceutical proteins cannot yet compete directly with established platforms but they are beginning to penetrate niche markets that allow the beneficial properties of plants to be exploited, such as the ability to produce 'biobetters' with tailored glycans, the ability to scale up production rapidly for emergency responses and the ability to produce commodity recombinant proteins on an agricultural scale. © 2015 Elsevier Inc.

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