Trilateral Research and Consulting

London, United Kingdom

Trilateral Research and Consulting

London, United Kingdom
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Wurster S.,TU Berlin | Kamara I.,Vrije Universiteit Brussel | Sveinsdottir T.,Trilateral Research and Consulting
Proceedings of the 2016 ITU Kaleidoscope Academic Conference: ICTs for a Sustainable World, ITU WT 2016 | Year: 2016

The United Nations formulated 17 sustainable development goals to "transform our world". Goal 11 aims to "make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable". As such, security systems have become increasingly relevant, particularly in the past several years as significant and dangerous threats have emerged throughout the world. In addition to said risks, a number of security solutions, for example in the field of CCTV, are linked with significant privacy risks. Therefore, an appropriate certification scheme for security systems that not only considers security aspects but also additional issues, e.g. data protection and privacy, is needed in Europe. The EU Project CRISP (Evaluation and Certification Schemes for Security Products) aims to facilitate this process via the development of pan-European certification. This paper shows CRISP's solutions based on the current outcomes of the project and its specific contribution to research and practice. © 2016 International Telecommunication Union.


Finn R.L.,Trilateral Research and Consulting | Wright D.,Trilateral Research and Consulting
Computer Law and Security Review | Year: 2012

This paper examines how the use of unmanned aircraft systems (UASs) for surveillance in civil applications impacts upon privacy and other civil liberties. It argues that, despite the heterogeneity of these systems, the same "usual suspects" - the poor, people of colour and anti-government protesters - are targeted by UAS deployments. It discusses how current privacy-related legislation in the US, UK and European Union might apply to UASs. We find that current regulatory mechanisms do not adequately address privacy and civil liberties concerns because UASs are complex, multimodal surveillance systems that integrate a range of technologies and capabilities. The paper argues for a combination of top-down, legislated requirements and bottom-up impact assessments to adequately address privacy and civil liberties. © 2012 Grace Li. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Wright D.,Trilateral Research and Consulting
Computer Law and Security Review | Year: 2012

There is growing interest in Europe in privacy impact assessment (PIA). The UK introduced the first PIA methodology in Europe in 2007, and Ireland followed in 2010. PIAs provide a way to detect potential privacy problems, take precautions and build tailored safeguards before, not after, the organisation makes heavy investments in the development of a new technology, service or product. This paper presents some findings from the Privacy Impact Assessment Framework (PIAF) project and, in particular, the project's first deliverable, which analyses the similarities and differences between PIA methodologies in Australia, Canada, Hong Kong, Ireland, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and the United States, with a view to picking out the best elements which could be used in constructing an optimised PIA methodology for Europe. The project, which began in January 2011, is being undertaken for the European Commission's Directorate General Justice. The first deliverable was completed in September. The paper provides some background on privacy impact assessment, identifies some of its benefits and discusses elements that can be used in construction of a state-of-the-art PIA methodology. © 2011 David Wright. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Watson H.,Trilateral Research and Consulting | Finn R.L.,Trilateral Research and Consulting
ISCRAM 2014 Conference Proceedings - 11th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management | Year: 2014

Studies examining the role of social media (SM) use in a crisis often examine the use of SM following a largescale crisis requiring an immediate response. In contrast, this working paper examines the usefulness of SM during an extended crisis, in the form of a heat wave. Authors use the 2013 UK heat wave as a case study to examine how SM was used by different stakeholders during the event, what function(s) SM had, how it was engaged with by the online community and accordingly, what value it contributed to crisis management activities. Findings show that ultimately the nature of the crisis, particularly in relation to populations who are most likely to be vulnerable to its effects, plays an integral role to the value of SM in preparation and response activities.


Watson H.,Trilateral Research and Consulting
Terrorism and Political Violence | Year: 2012

This article seeks to provide results from an investigation into the impact of dependent citizen journalism on the publicity of terror. In the past, many academics have identified the importance of publicity to an act of terror drawing on the concept of "propaganda by deed." This article presents results of a study into the impact of a distinct form of journalism in the digital era, dependent citizen journalism, on the publicity of terror. The argument is put forth that dependent citizen journalism generates distinctive, additional publicity to a terrorist attack. The article seeks to show how this publicity differs and what negative consequences there are to the involvement of dependent citizen journalists in the reporting process. © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.


Kroener I.,Trilateral Research and Consulting | Wright D.,Trilateral Research and Consulting
Information Society | Year: 2014

Recent controversies surrounding privacy have sparked a move by regulators toward the idea of privacy by design (PbD), a concept pioneered by Ontario Information and Privacy Commissioner Ann Cavoukian. Industry has also started to recognize the importance of taking privacy seriously, with various PbD corporate initiatives currently underway. However, some commentators have criticized PbD for being too vague. Using three case studies and a range of best practice examples of PbD, privacy impact assessments (PIAs), and privacy-enhancing technologies (PETs), this article addresses the gap between the abstract principles of PbD and their operationalization into more concrete implementation guidelines for software engineers. © 2014, Published with license by Taylor & Francis.


Watson H.,Trilateral Research and Consulting | Finn R.L.,Trilateral Research and Consulting
ISCRAM 2013 Conference Proceedings - 10th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management | Year: 2013

In a relatively new area of research for crisis management, this working paper presents a preliminary discussion of some of the privacy and ethical implications surrounding the use of social media in the event of a crisis. The paper uses the chaos caused by the eruptions of the Eyjafjallajokull volcano in 2010 to contextualise the analysis. It begins by presenting two case studies of the use of social media by members of the public and the aviation industry during the crisis caused by the ash plume. The paper then proceeds to briefly highlight some select ethical and privacy implications stemming from the use of social media such as privacy infringements and inequality. The paper concludes by briefly summarising the findings of the paper and considering next steps for future research in this area.


Wright D.,Trilateral Research and Consulting
Ethics and Information Technology | Year: 2011

This paper proposes a framework for an ethical impact assessment which can be performed in regard to any policy, service, project or programme involving information technology. The framework is structured on the four principles posited by Beauchamp and Childress together with a separate section on privacy and data protection. The framework identifies key social values and ethical issues, provides some brief explanatory contextual information which is then followed by a set of questions aimed at the technology developer or policy-maker to facilitate consideration of ethical issues, in consultation with stakeholders, which may arise in their undertaking. In addition, the framework includes a set of ethical tools and procedural practices which can be employed as part of the ethical impact assessment. Although the framework has been developed within a European context, it could be applied equally well beyond European borders. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.


Wright D.,Trilateral Research and Consulting | Raab C.D.,University of Edinburgh
Computer Law and Security Review | Year: 2012

This paper describes surveillance impact assessment (SIA), a methodology for identifying, assessing and resolving risks, in consultation with stakeholders, posed by the development of surveillance systems. This paper appears to be the first such to elaborate an SIA methodology. It argues that the process of conducting an SIA should be similar to that of a privacy impact assessment (PIA), but that an SIA must take account of a wider range of issues, impacts and stakeholders. The paper categorises the issues and impacts to be considered in the conduct of an SIA and identifies the benefits of a properly conducted SIA. © 2012 Baker and McKenzie LLP. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Wright D.,Trilateral Research and Consulting | Friedewald M.,Fraunhofer Institute for Systems and Innovation Research
Science and Public Policy | Year: 2013

New and emerging technologies often raise both ethical and privacy issues. The analysis and assessment of such issues is the task of privacy impact assessments and ethical impact assessments. Although there are various privacy impact assessment methodologies and ethical impact assessment methodologies, the two have not been integrated. Nevertheless, some researchers have been thinking about the utility and feasibility of integrating privacy and ethical impact assessment methodologies. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

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