Peach Springs, AZ, United States
Peach Springs, AZ, United States

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Teufel-Shone N.I.,University of Arizona | Gamber M.,University of Arizona | Watahomigie H.,Hualapai Tribe | Siyuja T.J.,Jr. | And 2 more authors.
Preventing Chronic Disease | Year: 2014

Introduction: In the United States, type 2 diabetes has reached epidemic proportions among indigenous people. Community-based participatory research offers American Indian communities and university partners an opportunity to integrate skills in community action and systematic inquiry to develop locally acceptable primary prevention interventions to combat diabetes risk factors. The Hualapa Tribe and the University of Arizona designed, implemented, and assessed a school-based physical activity intervention to reduce diabetes risk factors among youth. Methods: During a 2-year period, trained community members led in-school physical activity classes 2 times per week among students in grades 3 through 8. Body mass index (BMI), fitness measures, and fasting blood glucose level were measured on 6 occasions. Descriptive statistics and t tests were used to assess change in outcome measures. Results Of the more than 100 youth who took part in the physical activity classes for 2 years, 71 youth (38 male, 33 female) participated in 3 or more data collection sessions. Over time, the percentage of youth with a high fasting blood glucose level of more than 125 mg/dL decreased concurrently with significant improvements in fitness measures. However, BMI increased in both male and female participants. The high number of youth who missed more than 3 data collection sessions was attributed to poor school attendance and tardiness. Conclusion: Classes led by lay physical activity leaders can affect diabetes risk factors in youth. Incongruous health and fitness outcomes suggest that one indicator does not adequately define the risk profile BMI alone may not be sufficient as a measure of diabetes risk in youth.


Chico-Jarillo T.M.,University of Arizona | Crozier A.,Hualapai Tribe | Teufel-Shone N.I.,University of Arizona | Hutchens T.,Hualapai Tribe | George M.,Hualapai Tribe
Preventing Chronic Disease | Year: 2016

Young people can be valuable motivational resources for health promotion. A project implemented from 2009 through 2013 in a small American Indian community in northwest Arizona recruited American Indian young people aged 10 to 21 as agents of change for health promotion through radio programming. Thirty-seven participants were recruited and trained in broadcasting and creative writing techniques; they produced and aired 3 radio dramas. In post-project evaluation, participants were confident they could influence community behaviors but thought that training techniques were too similar to those used in school activities and thus reduced their drive to engage. Effective engagement of young people requires creativity to enhance recruitment, retention, and impact.


PubMed | Hualapai Tribe and University of Arizona
Type: | Journal: Preventing chronic disease | Year: 2014

In the United States, type 2 diabetes has reached epidemic proportions among indigenous people. Community-based participatory research offers American Indian communities and university partners an opportunity to integrate skills in community action and systematic inquiry to develop locally acceptable primary prevention interventions to combat diabetes risk factors. The Hualapai Tribe and the University of Arizona designed, implemented, and assessed a school-based physical activity intervention to reduce diabetes risk factors among youth.During a 2-year period, trained community members led in-school physical activity classes 2 times per week among students in grades 3 through 8. Body mass index (BMI), fitness measures, and fasting blood glucose level were measured on 6 occasions. Descriptive statistics and t tests were used to assess change in outcome measures.Of the more than 100 youth who took part in the physical activity classes for 2 years, 71 youth (38 male, 33 female) participated in 3 or more data collection sessions. Over time, the percentage of youth with a high fasting blood glucose level of more than 125 mg/dL decreased concurrently with significant improvements in fitness measures. However, BMI increased in both male and female participants. The high number of youth who missed more than 3 data collection sessions was attributed to poor school attendance and tardiness.Classes led by lay physical activity leaders can affect diabetes risk factors in youth. Incongruous health and fitness outcomes suggest that one indicator does not adequately define the risk profile; BMI alone may not be sufficient as a measure of diabetes risk in youth.


News Article | November 16, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

A skyrocketing number of visitors to the Grand Canyon Skywalk, the Hualapai Lodge and other Grand Canyon West tourism experiences has made 2016 a record-setting year for the Grand Canyon Resort Corporation. On Monday, November 14, 2016, Grand Canyon West recorded its 1 millionth visitor for the year. That milestone came a full five weeks before last year’s millionth-visitor celebration, which was recorded on December 21, 2015. This year’s attendance record was celebrated by treating the two record-breaking visitors – Anna Smirnova and Oxana Karaseva, touring the West Rim from Moscow, Russia – to the full range of experiences available to Grand Canyon West guests, including a tour of Skywalk, a helicopter tour of the Grand Canyon, a horseback ride and a pontoon boat adventure along the Colorado River. "To have another record-breaking year in 2016 on top of last year’s record year is very special for Grand Canyon West and our more than 1,000 team members,” said Dr. Damon Clarke, the Chairman of the Hualapai Tribal Council. “Skywalk continues to flourish and it continues to get better as we improve the visitors’ center and add new restaurant and event space. We have big plans for Grand Canyon West. And, of course, we want to keep making sure that every one of our more than 1 million guests has the visit of a lifetime.” Grand Canyon West, operated by the Grand Canyon Resort Corporation, is owned by the Hualapai Tribe. GCRC oversees operations of Grand Canyon Skywalk, Hualapai River Runners, Hualapai Ranch, Walapai Market and the Hualapai Lodge. Final attendance for 2016 is expected to top more than 1.1 million visitors by year’s end, another double-digit increase over the year before. The jump to 1 million visitors in 2015 represented an increase of more than 13 percent compared to 2014. For interviews, please contact David Leibowitz at 602-317-1414 or at david(at)leibowitzsolo(dot)com. For more information or to purchase tickets to Grand Canyon West experiences, please visit http://grandcanyonwest.com/ today.

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