Treasury Wine Estates Ltd

Magill, Australia

Treasury Wine Estates Ltd

Magill, Australia
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News Article | May 23, 2017
Site: www.wineindustryadvisor.com

Brown-Forman Not Interested in Selling to Constellation Constellation Brands, the owner of Corona and Svedka Vodka, has made an approach to acquire Jack Daniel’s owner Brown-Forman, people with knowledge of the matter said… Lineup of Speakers Announced for Wine & Weed Symposium Wine Industry Network today announced the lineup of topics and speakers featured at the first ever Wine & Weed Symposium, to be held on August 3rd from 9 a.m. 4:45 p.m. at the Hyatt Vineyard Creek in Santa Rosa, CA… Did the English Invent Bubbly Before Dom Perignon? The French monk Dom Perignon is thought to have invented champagne in 1697. But 30 years earlier, an English scientist discovered winemakers on this side of the Channel… Is Treasury Wine Estates Limited in a Sound Financial Condition? Out of the three major stock categories based on market capitalization, mid-cap stocks such as Treasury Wine Estates Limited with a market capitalization of USD $7.08 Billion are the least popular among investors… Napa’s Top It Off Bottling Merges with Napa Barrel Care Winners and Losers in the Alcoholic Drinks Market Researchers Still Have a Lot to Learn About Spotted Lanternfly Total Wine Secures Two More Locations as Liquor Superstore Grows in Houston Why the FDA Is Inspecting Wineries DTC Tips from Walla Walla and the Willamette Valley Why Are Palates So Eurocentric on the East Coast? Why Is Everyone Against Prosecco? Feature Your Job Listing in the Afternoon Brief From Mom to Entrepreneur: How This Woman Is Disrupting the Wine Industry Gaw Van Male Takes Wine Law Practice to the Next Level 11 Things to Remember When Creating Your Own Private Label Brand Amcor and Recruiting Associates Network Partner for New Sales Executive Recruitment How IBWSS Provides New Sourcing Tool for Bulk Wine and Spirits Buyers Benovia Winery, Seghesio Family Vineyards and McEvoy Ranch Help Bay Area Lyme Foundation at Event Hosted by Alec Baldwin


News Article | May 25, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

With more than 24 years' experience in the consumer product and retail industries, Dan Irving will lead the development of the on-premise national chain business for WX Brands. Irving will also be responsible for business development in multiple international markets including Canada and the Caribbean. Previously, Irving ran the European business for WX Brands, establishing the company's European headquarters and expanding its business with leading U.K. retailers including Tesco, Sainsbury's, Majestic, and Ahold. Prior to the wine business, Irving spent 12 years as a management consultant for Deloitte Consulting and Price Waterhouse. Natasha Hayes, a seasoned marketer with more than 16 years in the premium and luxury wine business, will lead trade and direct-to-consumer (DTC) marketing for WX Brands national brands portfolio. She brings domestic and international marketing experience from positions with Constellation Brands, Jackson Family Wines and Treasury Wine Estates, where she managed international brands such as Kendall-Jackson, Ravenswood, and Lindeman's. Most recently Hayes oversaw trade and DTC marketing and public relations at Crimson Wine Group. "Dan and Natasha are highly experienced wine professionals who will be instrumental as we take the next steps in building our national brand portfolio," said Schiffer. WX Brands produces more than 80 exclusive brands of wine, beer and spirits for retailers internationally as well as a growing portfolio of proprietary national wine brands that are sold globally, including Bread & Butter Wines, Jamieson Ranch Vineyards, Chronic Cellars, and Our Daily Wines. Information on the company's brands, management and history, can be found at www.WXbrands.com. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/wx-brands-strengthens-sales--marketing-organization-300464109.html


News Article | May 26, 2017
Site: www.wineindustryadvisor.com

Treasury Wine Estates: Penfolds Did Not Hit Rock Bottom in China In a statement sent to dbHK, the company wrote, “A recent news story titled Australian wine brand Penfolds hitting rock bottom in China market disseminated and reposted across online… Viticulture Program at Texas Tech Plays Vital Role in Wine Industry Growth The High Plains of Texas will likely never be compared to places like Southern France, Spain or Italy when it comes to the subject of tourism… Fine Wine Investment: Bordeaux Rising For the purposes of clarity, the Bordeaux 500 differs from the 100 not just in terms of its breadth of composition, by producer, but also, crucially in Amphoras view, by vintage… Surprise Platinum Winners at Decanter World Wine Awards 2017 Find new wines and regions to explore with this round-up of some of the more surprising winners at the Decanter World Wine Awards 2017, which saw record entries of more than 17,200 wines coming in from Chile to China… Washington Second Largest Wine Producing Region in U.S. How Much Sugar Is in a Glass of Wine? 15 New Canned Wines and Cocktails To Try This Summer Obama Is in Italy and He Really Loves the Wine Feature Your Job Listing in the Afternoon Brief It’s What’s in the Bottle That Counts … Or Is It? Brown-Forman Not Interested in Selling to Constellation Winery or ‘Weedery’: Vineyards Rip Up Grapes, Switch to Pot The Ultimate Guide to Oak in Winemaking What’s in a Name? About $25 From Mom to Entrepreneur: How This Woman Is Disrupting the Wine Industry How Do Lodi Wines Stack Up Against the Best in the World?


News Article | May 26, 2017
Site: www.thedrinksbusiness.com

In a statement sent to dbHK, the company wrote, “A recent news story titled ‘Australian wine brand Penfolds hitting rock bottom in China market’(澳大利亚Penfolds葡萄酒中国市场遭遇低谷)disseminated and reposted across online and social media channels in China contains extremely misleading and inaccurate information related to Treasury Wine Estates (TWE) and the Penfolds brand owned by TWE.” In the original Chinese story that was first posted on China.com.cn, an official news portal directly under China’s State Council Information Office, it was claimed that TWE’s current financial performance is suffering a 53% decline and that the company is planning to cut 25 brands for “self-rescue”. The story was quickly picked up by People’s Daily Online, the official news portal of the Chinese Communist Party and was reposted by other news outlets and shared on Chinese social media platforms. In response, TWE wrote: “In fact, in the first half of Fiscal 2017, TWE Asia reported 75.6% EBITS growth to AU$79 million and an EBITS margin of 36.2%.” When asked by dbHK on the phone about the source for the 53% decline, Tommy Tse, North Asia public relations manager for the company, said the figure was lifted from reports posted a few years back. During the first half of the fiscal year of 2017, Asia reported the fastest EBITS growth rate and its sales volume, “increased strongly and price increases across key brands delivered positive NSR per case growth,” said the company in February when releasing its financial results. In the meantime, the company also reiterated that it is not planning to cut brands. “The TWE brand portfolio includes nearly 80 wine brands, such as the globally recognised Penfolds, Wolf Blass and Beringer Vineyards. Claims in the article of TWE terminating brands are completely false and misleading,” it wrote. TWE has enjoyed immense success in China market especially with the Penfolds brand, in part thanks to its auspicious Chinese transliteration ‘Ben Fu’ that means ‘chasing prosperity’. Tse maintains that the company is still looking into the case and that it retains its right to pursue legal actions against media outlets reporting on false information. At the time of publishing the original story that appeared on China.com.cn seems to have been removed from its website.


News Article | May 12, 2017
Site: winetitles.com.au

On 11 May, investment commentary website, The Motley Fool published an article summarising three shares that had hit 52 week high's. One of them being Treasury Wine Estates Ldt. "The Treasury Wine Estates Ltd (ASX: TWE) share price rose to an all-time high of $12.98 this week, which means that the global wine company has seen its shares rise a massive 21% year-to-date. Investors appear to have been very impressed with its half-year results which revealed a stunning 132% increase in net profit after tax to $132 million. " The author, James Mickleboro, goes on to add his opinion on investing at thsi time stating: "Much like Cochlear, I think Treasury Wine Estates is a fantastic company, but after such a strong rally I would be hesitant to buy its shares today. I think investors may be better off waiting for a better entry point." This statement runs in conjunction with another report published by Lenox Ledger on the same day, summarising carefully calculated statistics on Treasury Wine Estates' performance and place in the stock market. "The Piotroski F-Score is a scoring system between 1–9 that determines a firm’s financial strength. The score helps determine if a company’s stock is valuable or not. The Piotroski F-Score of Treasury Wine Estates Limited (ASX:TWE) is 7. A score of nine indicates a high value stock, while a score of one indicates a low value stock. The score is calculated by the return on assets (ROA), Cash flow return on assets (CFROA), change in return of assets, and quality of earnings. It is also calculated by a change in gearing or leverage, liquidity, and change in shares in issue. The score is also determined by change in gross margin and change in asset turnover. The Gross Margin Score is calculated by looking at the Gross Margin and the overall stability of the company over the course of 8 years.  The score is a number between one and one hundred (1 being best and 100 being the worst).  The Gross Margin Score of Treasury Wine Estates Limited (ASX:TWE) is 50.  The more stable the company, the lower the score.  If a company is less stable over the course of time, they will have a higher score." Considering these scores, it seems that right now might not be such a bad entry point for those looking to invest as the company has a reasonably stable outlook and good financial strength. The article goes on to add that the Magic Formula rating for TWE is 6174, however provides no context in to where this rating sits on a scale — is it /10,000 or /100,000. "Looking further, the MF Rank (aka the Magic Formula) is a formula that pinpoints a valuable company trading at a good price.  The formula is calculated by looking at companies that have a high earnings yield as well as a high return on invested capital. The MF Rank of Treasury Wine Estates Limited (ASX:TWE) is 6174.  A company with a low rank is considered a good company to invest in.  The Magic Formula was introduced in a book written by Joel Greenblatt, entitled, “The Little Book that Beats the Market”." Content for this piece originally appeared at The Motley Fool and Lenox Leger.


News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: wineindustryinsight.com

TOP NEWS Treasury Wine Estates reshapes leadership team U.S. Commerce chief says Canadian trade threats ‘inappropriate’ Cold snap that destroyed English vineyards may be worse than first thought US Economic Confidence Index Now at 2017 Low 2017 USA Trade Tasting Is Here. Join The Industry In New York City On May 16-17. Get Your Tickets …


News Article | May 15, 2017
Site: winetitles.com.au

The latest annual Australian and New Zealand Wine Industry Directory (WID) reveals positive signs of industry recovery despite wineries continuing to exit the industry. The 35th edition published by Winetitles Media and released today, shows a further decline in the number of Australian wineries to 2394 in 2016 from 2468 in 2015. The WID data also shows wine exports increased in 2016, rising by 11.4% to almost $2.11 billion, again led in volume of wine produced by Accolade Wines. Treasury Wine Estates remains top of the list for the value of wine exports. Total revenues of the top 20 wine producers increased by 9% or $345 million to an estimated $4066 million in the year to June. Growth in revenues was concentrated among the top five – Treasury Wine Estates, Pernod Ricard, Winemakers, Accolade Wines, Casella Wines and Australian Vintage, although 95% of the top 20 reported an increase in sales. The top 5 ranked companies of branded wine by volume remain unchanged from 2016 (table 1). Further details on Australia’s Top 20 ranked wine producer’s will be published in The Top 20 Australian Wine Companies report to be published in the April 2017 journal Australian and New Zealand Grapegrower and Winemaker, also published by Winetitles Media. Other industry sources reveal growth in grape prices and wine sales. The Winemakers’ Federation of Australia (WFA) calculated an average grape price per tonne purchased was $529, up 14% from $463 in 2015. This figure is the highest since 2009 and above the average price for the past five years of $477 per tonne. The Directory has listed all Australian wine companies who commercially sell wine every year since 1983, making it an invaluable barometer of trends, personnel and the overall health of the industry Elizabeth Bouzoudis, managing editor said that there are definite signs of an industry recovery. “With prices, production and exports increasing two years in a row, the industry is showing positive trends. While there was consolidation of winery numbers and grape producers, free trade agreements with China, Japan and South Korea are contributing factors in increase export sales’. With the price growth per tonne for grapes recording above-average gains for the popular varieties – Chardonnay up 21%, Cabernet Sauvignon up 17% and Shiraz up 14%, this may lead to a further shift of plantings away from the less popular varieties that under-performed the average.” Ms Bouzoudis said The 602 page 2017 Directory includes a comprehensive listing of wine producers, grapegrowers, suppliers, distributors, retailers, universities, research and education facilities, writers, wine publications, wine blogs, organisations, events and wine shows and industry personnel – updated annually. With an increasing number of wine industry organisations operating in the digital space, Winetitles Media has introduced Online Resources as a new section in the Directory. In line with publishing trends, the Wine Industry Directory Buyers’ Guide is also now available as an app. The benefits to users include having immediate access via a phone or tablet device to industry products and services, even when offline, plus easy navigation and hyperlinks to supplier websites. As information needs evolve and new media delivery methods are developed, The Directory will continue to offer additional digital sections and information for the Australian and New Zealand industries. Purchasers of The Directory also receive access to the WID Online, and can search listings, via Winetitles Media’s website (www.winetitles.com.au). The Directory is available from Winetitles Media for A$113.85 in Australia/New Zealand and A$175.00 overseas. (All prices include postage and include a subscription to the online search engine). For details, contact Winetitles Media on tel. +618 8369 9500; fax +618 8369 9501, e-mail , or online at www.winetitles.com.au The Australian and New Zealand Wine Industry Directory is proudly published by


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

LONDON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Technavio has announced the top five leading vendors in their recent global organic wine market report. This research report also lists eight other prominent vendors that are expected to impact the market during the forecast period. The global organic wine market is subject to rapidly changing consumer demands and preferences. Manufacturer performance in the market may be affected by the changing consumer spending pattern. It may also be affected by consumer tastes; regional, national, and local economic conditions; and demographic trends. “The market is highly fragmented due to the presence of numerous small and large vendors. The vendors in the market compete on the basis of factors such as price, quality, innovation, reputation, and distribution,” says Manjunath Reddy, a lead alcoholic beverages research analyst from Technavio. The increasing manufacturers’ competition may lead to companies reducing their product prices, which will negatively affect margins and the market growth. The current market includes companies of varying sizes. This report is available at a USD 1,000 discount for a limited time only: View market snapshot before purchasing Buy 1 Technavio report and get the second for 50% off. Buy 2 Technavio reports and get the third for free. Emiliana Organic Vineyards is located in Chile and is claimed to be the world's largest organic vineyard. They own more than 800 hectares of certified organic vineyards in Chile and produce about 580,000 cases of certified organic wine. The company exports its wines to more than 60 countries. The total estate covers an area of about 1,033 acres, of which 465 acres is under organic farming. King Estate Winery is certified organic by Oregon Tilth and is recognized as the world's largest contiguous organic vineyard. The company still remains a family-owned and operated entity. The company produces about 350,000 cases of wine annually. The Wine Group is the world's second largest wine producer by volume. The company markets its products in North America, Western Europe, and Asia. The leading brands are Franzia, flipflop, Almaden, and Cupcake. Treasury Wine Estates is an Australian wine company. It is a vertically integrated wine company, which is engaged in viniculture and winemaking. The company business model functions on the core principal operations such as grape growing, grape sourcing, and wine production, marketing, distribution, and packaging. Concha y Toro has distribution in the UK, Brazil, Sweden, Finland, Norway, Singapore, the US, and Mexico. Its retail activity is carried out through its commercial offices in Canada, South Africa, and China. The company’s principal subsidiaries include Viña Cono Sur, Viña Maipo, Viña Palo Alto, Viña Maycas del Limari, and Trivento Bodegas y Vinedos. Become a Technavio Insights member and access all three of these reports for a fraction of their original cost. As a Technavio Insights member, you will have immediate access to new reports as they’re published in addition to all 6,000+ existing reports covering segments like food, food service, and non-alcoholic beverages. This subscription nets you thousands in savings, while staying connected to Technavio’s constant transforming research library, helping you make informed business decisions more efficiently. Technavio is a leading global technology research and advisory company. The company develops over 2000 pieces of research every year, covering more than 500 technologies across 80 countries. Technavio has about 300 analysts globally who specialize in customized consulting and business research assignments across the latest leading edge technologies. Technavio analysts employ primary as well as secondary research techniques to ascertain the size and vendor landscape in a range of markets. Analysts obtain information using a combination of bottom-up and top-down approaches, besides using in-house market modeling tools and proprietary databases. They corroborate this data with the data obtained from various market participants and stakeholders across the value chain, including vendors, service providers, distributors, re-sellers, and end-users. If you are interested in more information, please contact our media team at media@technavio.com.


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.thedrinksbusiness.com

While using an importer has traditionally been the most common route for foreign wineries, Rabobank says that as the US market has shifted, more producers are seeking out alternative routes to market to achieve greater penetration. “While this traditional relationship is still the most appropriate go-to-market strategy for many wineries and brands, the growing interest of many foreign wineries to build a stronger presence in the US market is leading some to consider alternative or incremental strategies, and there are a growing number of companies emerging in the US that offer various services to meet these needs.” One obvious disadvantage for foreign suppliers in using the traditional importer model is that they are unable to sell direct to consumers (DTC) the way that domestic wineries can. In 2016, DTC sales increased by 18.5%, and has been a critical channel for small domestic producers to grow sales and improve margins, said Rabobank. “Foreign wineries are obliged to use an importer to access the US market. This is not meant to disparage the role of the importer, as they offer a valuable service, but being obliged to go through an importer creates some distinct disadvantages for foreign suppliers. First, and most obviously, it means that imported brands face an additional layer of costs (i.e. the importer’s margin) to enter the US market, that domestic wineries do not pay. “Second, the importer acts as an additional filter in the communication between the supplier and the ultimate client (e.g. the retailer). Finally, and perhaps most importantly, is that most major importers are increasingly demanding an equity stake in any brand they agree to represent. This is a stipulation that many brand owners may find unpalatable.” Approaching the US market as one market in itself is not always the best course of action, as it is in fact a composition of (at least) 50 different markets, says Rabobank, each with “different demographics and vastly different structures and laws governing the sale of wine”. Consequently, more producers are seeking out alternative routes to target individual markets. Contract import services for example offer importers a ‘pick and mix’ range of services, from basic import and logistics services to accounting and finance support. Likewise, contract third-party and marketing support offers importers with additional sales support in various markets and raise its profile. The downside is that results are not guaranteed, and given the cost involved. For larger producers, with capital to hand, a common methods has been to acquire a US winery as a distribution platform, as was the intention of Treasury Wine Estates’ with its purchase of Beringer in 2000, and also a likely factor in Viña Concha y Toro’s acquisition of Fetzer in 2011. “The rationale for this strategy is obvious, and we view it as a viable option, but making it work is not a simple task,” said Rabobank. “Given that this strategy depends on acquiring brands that currently enjoy distribution strength in the market, it is a strategy that will require a significant amount of capital to implement and it exposes the owner to some operational risk in a new market.” Other options include acquiring your own import company within the US, as was the case for Grupo Mezzacorona from Italy and Sogrape from Portugal, providing a direct relationship with wholesalers, or securing a distribution agreement with a larger wine company. “A large domestic winery will have more clout with the wholesaler, but the agency brand competes at some level with the other brands in the domestic winery’s portfolio for attention and support,” says Rabobank. “Ultimately, there will always be more incentive to support its own brands.” While alternative routes to market are gaining in popularity among some producers, Rabobank concedes that despite its limitations the importer model is “still the most critical ally in the market for many foreign suppliers”, but that the decision of which model to adopt was ultimately “horses for courses”. “Many brand owners see this as a good time to re- evaluate their route-to-market strategy as there are new companies emerging, and new options evolving,” said Rabobank. “There is no one right strategy or perfect solution—each option has advantages and drawbacks—but it is a ‘horses for courses’ analysis, in which the appropriate structure will depend on a variety of factors, including the scale to which the brand owner aspires, how much capital is available to be invested and the owner’s tolerance for risk.” Generally, the volumes of wine imports into the US have slowed in recent years. In 2016, US wine imports rose 1% in volume and 3% in value, with imported wines maintaining their market share, representing 33% of total US wine consumption. However Rabobank analysts pointing out that the market’s slowing volume growth was in fact the result of declining volumes of less profitable wine, priced below $8/bottle, while the most profitable wines, priced above $8/bottle, steadily rising. Wines priced above USD 11/bottle are growing by double-digits. “The US market offers scale, growth and attractive margins for those that can effectively penetrate it,” the report stressed. “This is not a new phenomenon, but the rebound in the value of the US dollar, as well as increasing challenges in other markets (e.g. the weakness of the British pound and uncertainty around future trade agreements with the UK in the wake of Brexit), make the US wine market increasingly more attractive by comparison. Over the course of the past year, we have had numerous conversations with foreign clients looking to increase their presence and penetration in the US market.” Italy remains the largest source of imports, growing 4% in 2016, with the growth of sparkling wines (29%) and vermouth (17%) compensating for a mild decline in bottled still wine shipments. Imports of French wines grew by 9% overall, supported by strong growth of both still bottled wines (10%) and sparkling wines (6%). Imports of bottled wine from most New World producers to the US were down during the period, including Australia (-6%), Chile (-6%), and Argentina (-3%).


News Article | January 14, 2016
Site: www.reuters.com

Rows of vines can be seen at sunset at Yalumba's Jansz estate in the Tamar Valley, located in the northeast of Tasmania June 4, 2014. Just weeks out from the 2016 harvest, the contrasting events highlight the challenges from climate change, particularly extreme weather, faced by the world's fourth-largest wine exporter. Not only are wine growing regions getting hotter, weather is also becoming more unpredictable, scientists say. "We've had one of the biggest downpours we have had in a long time," said Neil McGuigan, chief executive of Australian Vintage Ltd, one of the largest wine producers in the Hunter Valley, some 250 km (155 miles) north of Sydney. "We are on the edge, if we get more rain, we will start to develop disease and as soon as that happens, you will not be able to harvest the fruit," said McGuigan. As much as 200 millimetres (7.9 inches) of rain fell across Australia's east coast last week, data from the country's Bureau of Meteorology shows, twice the average January rainfall. By contrast, Bernie Worthington in Western Australia lost his vineyard when a bushfire burned his property in Waroona in the state's southwest last week. Even if wildfires don't destroy a crop, they can leave an entire vintage with "smoke taint", leading to wines that taste like an ashtray. The climate extremes seen through the 2015/16 season are a foretaste of future climate change, scientists say, which is threatening the outlook for Australia's wine industry. Australia produces about 1.2 million tonnes of wine a year, exporting more than half to the United States, Britain and Asia in sales worth A$1.96 billion ($1.37 billion) in 2014/15. But its main wine regions are getting hotter and drier, with temperatures projected to increase by between 0.3 and 1.7 degrees Celsius by 2030, according to Australia's science agency, the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO). At the same time, the CSIRO said the intensity of extreme rainfall events is likely to increase, a pattern already seen over the last 12 months. "The science projections do not point to Australia's climate getting any more favorable," said Phin Ziebell, agribusiness economist, National Australia Bank. Climate change mitigation is at the forefront of plans by Australia's largest growers, including Treasury Wine Estates Ltd, which is looking at cooler climate vineyards in places like the southernmost island state of Tasmania. Other measures to deal with warmer temperatures include new irrigation methods that save water and specially developed sunscreen that is sprayed on grapes. But growers say they have only limited tools to lessen the impact of unexpected torrential rain, with a switch to more tolerant varieties the only option for many. This can take many years to establish new crops. That threatens the nascent resurgence in Australian wine exports, which grew in 2014/15 for the first time in seven years as the industry battled a stronger Australian dollar, increased competition from Europe and stiff tariffs in some Asian nations. A weaker local currency and trade deals in several countries have helped exporters, but increased competition from Europe is still hurting. Industry groups are also calling for government assistance to help reverse an 8 percent fall in sales last year to the United States, Australia's largest market. In the Hunter, growers are crossing their fingers, hoping for no further rain in the next month, the only way they'll avoid production losses, said McGuigan, while other wine areas are studying the fallout from recent hot weather. "The crop levels are a moving feast," said Andrew Weeks, executive director of the industry body, Wine Grape Growers Authority. "Many regions agree that berry size is down on many varieties, which will lead to a reduced yield in most cases."

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