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News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

LONDON, May 4, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- About Organic Wine Organic wine is produced from grapes that are grown organically. Organic cultivation excludes the use of artificial fertilizers, pesticides, fungicides, and herbicides. There are more than 2,000 organic wine producers globally. Since organic grape cultivation does not make use of any harmful chemicals, it is beneficial for both the environment and the crop. Grapes constitute one of those agricultural products that receive the heaviest application of pesticides, and conventional wines produced from such grapes generally contain pesticide residues. However, since organic wine is prepared from organic grapes, it is free from pesticide residues. Download the full report: https://www.reportbuyer.com/product/4877214/ Technavio's analysts forecast the global organic wine market to grow at a CAGR of 10.05% during the period 2017-2021. Covered in this report The report covers the present scenario and the growth prospects of the global organic wine market for 2017-2021. To calculate the market size, the report presents a detailed picture of the market by way of study, synthesis, and summation of data from multiple sources. The market is divided into the following segments based on geography: • Americas • APAC • EMEA Technavio's report, Global Organic Wine Market 2017-2021, has been prepared based on an in-depth market analysis with inputs from industry experts. The report covers the market landscape and its growth prospects over the coming years. The report also includes a discussion of the key vendors operating in this market. Key vendors • Emiliana Organic Vineyards • King Estate Winery • The Wine Group • Treasury Wine Estates • Concha y Toro Other prominent vendors • Armit Wines • Boutinot • Chateau Maris • DeLoach Vineyards • Distell Group • Grgich Hills Estate • Lapostolle • The Organic Wine Company Market driver • Increasing number of organic vineyards. • For a full, detailed list, view our report Market challenge • Campaigns against alcohol consumption. • For a full, detailed list, view our report Market trend • Slow shift in wine production. • For a full, detailed list, view our report Key questions answered in this report • What will the market size be in 2021 and what will the growth rate be? • What are the key market trends? • What is driving this market? • What are the challenges to market growth? • Who are the key vendors in this market space? • What are the market opportunities and threats faced by the key vendors? • What are the strengths and weaknesses of the key vendors? You can request one free hour of our analyst's time when you purchase this market report. Details are provided within the report. Methodology Download the full report: https://www.reportbuyer.com/product/4877214/ About Reportbuyer Reportbuyer is a leading industry intelligence solution that provides all market research reports from top publishers http://www.reportbuyer.com For more information: Sarah Smith Research Advisor at Reportbuyer.com Email: query@reportbuyer.com   Tel: +44 208 816 85 48 Website: www.reportbuyer.com To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/global-organic-wine-market-2017-2021-300451718.html


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

19 Crimes wine fans love tattoos. This month, the Treasury Wine Estates wine brand launches a new campaign by J. Walter Thompson San Francisco that is perfectly in tune with their fans’ love of ink. With #InfamousInk, the brand recruited San Francisco-based tattoo artist Austin Maples to design 19 original illustrations that offer a modern interpretation of the rebellious history that inspired the brand's name: In the 1780s, the British government initiated a “punishment by transportation” through which criminals convicted of a list of 19 crimes – from petty larceny to impersonating an Egyptian – were sentenced to live in Australia. The first illustration for Grand Larceny, crime 1 of 19, was unveiled today on the brand’s Facebook and Instagram pages. Each week until mid-August, the brand will take to their Facebook and Instagram channels to unveil one illustration alongside a bottle shot themed around that week’s revealed crime and behind-the-scenes footage centering on the artist, his inspiration, and his process. The campaign kicked off on April 6 with a short teaser film introducing Maples, the man behind the ink, and showing him at work with a bottle of 19 Crimes at his station. Sean DallasKidd, Executive Creative Director at J. Walter Thompson San Francisco, said of the campaign, “We looked at the 19 Crimes consumer base and saw this interest in niche things like tattoos. We wanted to create something that could really speak to what these wine drinkers care about, beyond the brand, while also retelling the brand story with this edgy, modern spin. Working with a wine brand that is so comfortable with stepping out of what’s normal for the wine category really inspired us to do something that was also creatively out-of-the-box.” Samantha Collins, Marketing Director for 19 Crimes, added, “While many of the people exiled to Australia were convicted of petty crimes, some were also political prisoners who were punished for following their beliefs and defying convention. We see that same rebellious spirit in 19 Crimes fans who want to live infamously in their own way. #InfamousInk nicely brings to life our brand story in a way that our wine drinkers care about.” #InfamousInk marks the first element of #LiveInfamously, the new 19 Crimes brand platform also created by J. Walter Thompson San Francisco. The platform is an invitation to wine drinkers to borrow from the rogue ethos of the convicts and live a life that is authentic and defies norms. ABOUT 19 CRIMES WINES In 18th-century Britain, criminals found guilty of committing one of 19 crimes punishable by transportation, from grand and petty larceny to impersonating an Egyptian, were banished to Australia to form the first penal colony. Today, Australia’s 19 Crimes wines celebrate the rebellious spirit of more than 160,000 exiled men and women, the rule breakers and law defying citizens that forged a new culture and national spirit in Australia, complete with labels depicting the different criminals-turned-colonists on the bottles. For more information on 19 Crimes, please visit http://19crimes.com/. ABOUT J. WALTER THOMPSON WORLDWIDE J. Walter Thompson Worldwide, the world’s best-known marketing communications brand, has been creating pioneering solutions that build enduring brands and business for more than 150 years. Headquartered in New York, J. Walter Thompson is a true global network with more than 200 offices in over 90 countries, employing nearly 10,000 marketing professionals. The agency consistently ranks among the top networks in the world and continues to be a dominant presence in the industry by staying on the leading edge—from hiring the industry’s first female copywriter to developing award-winning branded content today. For more information, please visit http://www.jwt.com and follow us @JWT_Worldwide.


This report studies Garry Wine in Global market, especially in North America, China, Europe, Southeast Asia, Japan and India, with production, revenue, consumption, import and export in these regions, from 2012 to 2016, and forecast to 2022. This report focuses on top manufacturers in global market, with production, price, revenue and market share for each manufacturer, covering By types, the market can be split into Price below 20 USD Price 20-50 USD Price over 50 USD By Application, the market can be split into Retail Market Auction Sales By Regions, this report covers (we can add the regions/countries as you want) North America China Europe Southeast Asia Japan India Global Garry Wine Market Professional Survey Report 2017 1 Industry Overview of Garry Wine 1.1 Definition and Specifications of Garry Wine 1.1.1 Definition of Garry Wine 1.1.2 Specifications of Garry Wine 1.2 Classification of Garry Wine 1.2.1 Price below 20 USD 1.2.2 Price 20-50 USD 1.2.3 Price over 50 USD 1.3 Applications of Garry Wine 1.3.1 Retail Market 1.3.2 Auction Sales 1.3.3 Application 3 1.4 Market Segment by Regions 1.4.1 North America 1.4.2 China 1.4.3 Europe 1.4.4 Southeast Asia 1.4.5 Japan 1.4.6 India 2 Manufacturing Cost Structure Analysis of Garry Wine 2.1 Raw Material and Suppliers 2.2 Manufacturing Cost Structure Analysis of Garry Wine 2.3 Manufacturing Process Analysis of Garry Wine 2.4 Industry Chain Structure of Garry Wine 8 Major Manufacturers Analysis of Garry Wine 8.1 E&J Gallo 8.1.1 Company Profile 8.1.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.1.2.1 Product A 8.1.2.2 Product B 8.1.3 E&J Gallo 2016 Garry Wine Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.1.4 E&J Gallo 2016 Garry Wine Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.2 The Wine Group 8.2.1 Company Profile 8.2.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.2.2.1 Product A 8.2.2.2 Product B 8.2.3 The Wine Group 2016 Garry Wine Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.2.4 The Wine Group 2016 Garry Wine Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.3 Constellation Brands 8.3.1 Company Profile 8.3.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.3.2.1 Product A 8.3.2.2 Product B 8.3.3 Constellation Brands 2016 Garry Wine Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.3.4 Constellation Brands 2016 Garry Wine Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.4 Castel 8.4.1 Company Profile 8.4.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.4.2.1 Product A 8.4.2.2 Product B 8.4.3 Castel 2016 Garry Wine Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.4.4 Castel 2016 Garry Wine Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.5 Accolade Wines 8.5.1 Company Profile 8.5.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.5.2.1 Product A 8.5.2.2 Product B 8.5.3 Accolade Wines 2016 Garry Wine Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.5.4 Accolade Wines 2016 Garry Wine Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.6 Cantine Riunite & CIV 8.6.1 Company Profile 8.6.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.6.2.1 Product A 8.6.2.2 Product B 8.6.3 Cantine Riunite & CIV 2016 Garry Wine Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.6.4 Cantine Riunite & CIV 2016 Garry Wine Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.7 Concha y Toro 8.7.1 Company Profile 8.7.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.7.2.1 Product A 8.7.2.2 Product B 8.7.3 Concha y Toro 2016 Garry Wine Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.7.4 Concha y Toro 2016 Garry Wine Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.8 Treasury Wine Estates 8.8.1 Company Profile 8.8.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.8.2.1 Product A 8.8.2.2 Product B 8.8.3 Treasury Wine Estates 2016 Garry Wine Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.8.4 Treasury Wine Estates 2016 Garry Wine Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.9 Grupo Penaflor 8.9.1 Company Profile 8.9.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.9.2.1 Product A 8.9.2.2 Product B 8.9.3 Grupo Penaflor 2016 Garry Wine Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.9.4 Grupo Penaflor 2016 Garry Wine Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.10 Pernod-Ricard 8.10.1 Company Profile 8.10.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.10.2.1 Product A 8.10.2.2 Product B 8.10.3 Pernod-Ricard 2016 Garry Wine Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.10.4 Pernod-Ricard 2016 Garry Wine Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.11 Bronco Wine 8.12 Caviro 8.13 Trinchero Family Estates 8.14 Antinori 8.15 Changyu 8.16 Casella Family Brands 8.17 Diageo 8.18 China Great Wall Wine 8.19 Jacob‘s Creek 8.20 Kendall-Jackson Vineyard Estates For more information, please visit https://www.wiseguyreports.com/sample-request/1245228-global-garry-wine-market-professional-survey-report-2017


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.wbmonline.com.au

Melanie Chester appears on the cover of WBM. It’s standing room only at the Wine Industry Marketing Conference, organised by Larry Lockshin. We flog off Larry’s new book, This Little Pinot Went to Market – a Guide to Wine Marketing. d’Arenberg unveils an artist’s impression of Chester Osborn’s Cube. Stunning. The Australia Day Tasting in London is a big success; huge pictures of Brendan Keys, Anna Pooley and Toby Bekkers adorn the walls of Lindley Hall. Andrew Calabria is in London for 12 hours – an early vintage beckons. WFA CEO Paul Evans resigns. Paul Battaglene takes over. It’s a good vintage. We crush 1.81 million tonnes – up six percent on 2015. It is 100,000 tonnes above the five-year average of 1.7 million tonnes. Dave Powell appears on the cover appears on the cover of WBM, with his son, Callum, an impressive lad. The first Powell & Son wines sell out. Dave talks about his depression. “I don’t know what all the fuss is about, depression is so common. There is a lot of it in the wine industry.” Dave smokes at the photo shoot. Cough. Tyson Stelzer gives Yering Station 2013 Yarra Valley Reserve Pinot Noir 95 points in WBM. Colin Kay and family launch a beautiful book: The First 125 Years. Brown Brothers buys Innocent Bystander. Vinomofo scores $25 million from Blue Sky Venture Capital to expand overseas; they end up spending a chunk of it on a new video. Brave New Wine makes us laugh with quirky marketing, soft drink bottle-style punts and quirky videos. Basket Range is all the rage and James Erskine is on the cover of WBM. Mike Bennie gives Mount Pleasant 2013 Old Paddock & Old Hill Shiraz 94 points. Barossa winemaker Kym Jenke dies suddenly. The UK leaves the EU. Malcolm Turnbull wins the Federal election. Senator Sean Edwards, who was intimately involved in tax negotiations, loses his seat. The Federal Budget includes changes to the WET rebate including having to own a winery. Assistant Treasurer Kelly O’Dwyer and Senator Anne Ruston vow to consult with industry to determine final eligibility criteria. Will Downie says asset tests are bullshit with a famous Instagram post. The small guys lobby government. Chris Tyrrell is on the cover of WBM is on the cover of WBM, which is included in satchels at the Technical Conference. A talking point at the event is America’s resurgence – and the emergence of Donald Trump as a contender for President. The Yeastie Boys rock Adelaide. Iain Riggs and Sally Evans accept the Maurice O’Shea on behalf of the Len Evans Tutorial. Aaron Ridgway becomes Wine Australia’s new head of market in the Americas. Pernod Ricard closes Morris winery after 167 years. Jacob’s Creek brings out a $180 wine for retiring Bernard Hickin. Yellowglen founder Ian Home dies, aged 87. Volumetric tax chatter goes on. Andrew Margan celebrates 20 years with an Off-Dry Semillon Vermouth. Josephine Perry of Dormilona is named Young Gun of Wine. The People’s Choice is Ricky Evans of Two Tonne Tasmania. Pernod Ricard says the Morris family has bought the business. An hour later John Casella issues a media release saying he in fact is the new owner. Andrea Frost appears on the cover of WBM. She is short-listed in the Champagne Louis Roederer International Wine Writers’ Awards. It’s a cool, wet spring in SA and Victoria. Treasury Wine Estates CEO Michael Clarke announces a net profit after tax of $179.4 million. The comeback is complete. Wine Ark says Penfolds Bin 389 is Australia’s most collected wine, replacing Grange. Winemaker Neville Falkenberg passes away. Andrew Caillard gives 2012 Grange 100 points. A hail storm wreaks havoc in the Riverland and other inland regions. China becomes Australia’s biggest wine export market with sales of $474 million, up 51 percent on the previous year. Warren Randall is excited: Seppeltsfield wins Global Best of Wine Tourism at the Great Wine Capitals awards in Portugal. Peter Gago and Penfolds host a lavish dinner to launch their $185,000 crystal pourer. Relax, one of only five imperials of 2012 Grange is included in the price. Steve Pannell is the Bushing King. Brokenwood winemaker Stuart Hordern is dux of the Len Evans Tutorial. Deep Woods Estate 2014 Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon wins the Jimmy, a Chinese businessman buys Rymill, Jim Barry Wines releases Australia’s first assyrtiko and Pete Bissell’s snake photo goes viral. Wine Industry Suppliers Australia hosts the inaugural Impact Awards in front of a big audience. Winners are Eco Trellis and Byrne Vineyards, Seeley International, Blue H20 Filtration and Vinpac International, Wineworks Australia, Bottle Shop Concepts and Getaways SA. WFA chairman Tony D’Aloisio moves on; Sandy Clark replaces him. Donald Trump becomes President of the USA. Peter Fraser is on the cover is on the cover of WBM. The Women in Wine Awards honour Emma Norbiato, Prue Henschke, Jenny Semmler, Roberta De Bei, Cassandra Collins, Iain Riggs and Rebecca Barr. Accolade buys Lion’s wine portfolio of St Hallett, Stonier, Petaluma, Croser, Knappstein and Tatachilla. Turnbull backflips on the new WET rebate changes – there is no asset test. The small guys crack nice bottles. Buy Will Downie a drink. We receive our first Christmas card – from Peter Barry. WISA’s WineTech 2017 is postponed. Robert Hill-Smith loses his court case against Pernod Ricard. Max Allen resigns from The Australian after 19 years to accept another gig. d’Arry turns 90. Merry Christmas. Happy New Year. Let’s hope it’s a good one.


News Article | January 14, 2016
Site: www.reuters.com

Rows of vines can be seen at sunset at Yalumba's Jansz estate in the Tamar Valley, located in the northeast of Tasmania June 4, 2014. Just weeks out from the 2016 harvest, the contrasting events highlight the challenges from climate change, particularly extreme weather, faced by the world's fourth-largest wine exporter. Not only are wine growing regions getting hotter, weather is also becoming more unpredictable, scientists say. "We've had one of the biggest downpours we have had in a long time," said Neil McGuigan, chief executive of Australian Vintage Ltd, one of the largest wine producers in the Hunter Valley, some 250 km (155 miles) north of Sydney. "We are on the edge, if we get more rain, we will start to develop disease and as soon as that happens, you will not be able to harvest the fruit," said McGuigan. As much as 200 millimetres (7.9 inches) of rain fell across Australia's east coast last week, data from the country's Bureau of Meteorology shows, twice the average January rainfall. By contrast, Bernie Worthington in Western Australia lost his vineyard when a bushfire burned his property in Waroona in the state's southwest last week. Even if wildfires don't destroy a crop, they can leave an entire vintage with "smoke taint", leading to wines that taste like an ashtray. The climate extremes seen through the 2015/16 season are a foretaste of future climate change, scientists say, which is threatening the outlook for Australia's wine industry. Australia produces about 1.2 million tonnes of wine a year, exporting more than half to the United States, Britain and Asia in sales worth A$1.96 billion ($1.37 billion) in 2014/15. But its main wine regions are getting hotter and drier, with temperatures projected to increase by between 0.3 and 1.7 degrees Celsius by 2030, according to Australia's science agency, the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO). At the same time, the CSIRO said the intensity of extreme rainfall events is likely to increase, a pattern already seen over the last 12 months. "The science projections do not point to Australia's climate getting any more favorable," said Phin Ziebell, agribusiness economist, National Australia Bank. Climate change mitigation is at the forefront of plans by Australia's largest growers, including Treasury Wine Estates Ltd, which is looking at cooler climate vineyards in places like the southernmost island state of Tasmania. Other measures to deal with warmer temperatures include new irrigation methods that save water and specially developed sunscreen that is sprayed on grapes. But growers say they have only limited tools to lessen the impact of unexpected torrential rain, with a switch to more tolerant varieties the only option for many. This can take many years to establish new crops. That threatens the nascent resurgence in Australian wine exports, which grew in 2014/15 for the first time in seven years as the industry battled a stronger Australian dollar, increased competition from Europe and stiff tariffs in some Asian nations. A weaker local currency and trade deals in several countries have helped exporters, but increased competition from Europe is still hurting. Industry groups are also calling for government assistance to help reverse an 8 percent fall in sales last year to the United States, Australia's largest market. In the Hunter, growers are crossing their fingers, hoping for no further rain in the next month, the only way they'll avoid production losses, said McGuigan, while other wine areas are studying the fallout from recent hot weather. "The crop levels are a moving feast," said Andrew Weeks, executive director of the industry body, Wine Grape Growers Authority. "Many regions agree that berry size is down on many varieties, which will lead to a reduced yield in most cases."


Sadras V.O.,South Australian Research And Development Institute | Petrie P.R.,Treasury Wine Estates Ltd
Australian Journal of Grape and Wine Research | Year: 2011

Background and Aim: To predict the trajectory of sugar accumulation in berries for planning of harvest and post-harvest operations, we derived a simple model that is consistent with the known biological and viticultural drivers of berry ripening and requires inputs that are readily available to industry. Methods and Results: We used data from three vintages in climatically contrasting regions of Australia to derive a relationship between total soluble solids (TSS) and thermal time. A linear-plateau function was fitted to the 90th percentile data, hence providing a boundary function representing the potential for each variety-environment combination. Biologically relevant parameters were derived including the rate of change in TSS, maximum TSS (TSSmax), the threshold thermal time when berries reached TSSmax, the onset and the duration of the period of linear increase in TSS. Gaps, calculated as the difference between actual TSS and the boundary function, correlated positively with vapour pressure. A model with the observed onset of ripening as an input and a variety and site specific rate as parameter accounted for 81-92% of the variation in TSS for independent data sets. Conclusion: The trajectory of TSS in berries can be modelled 'as if' the main environmental and management sources of variation affect the onset rather than the rate of sugar accumulation. Significance of the Study: Our onset-rate model can be coupled with: (i) short-term temperature forecasts to predict the trajectory of TSS for management purposes; and (ii) long-term records of temperature to produce probabilistic profiles of maturity date. © 2011 Australian Society of Viticulture and Oenology Inc.


Sadras V.O.,South Australian Research And Development Institute | Petrie P.R.,Treasury Wine Estates Ltd.
Australian Journal of Grape and Wine Research | Year: 2011

Background and Aim: Early maturity of grape crops associated with recent warming is well documented but poorly understood. Here, we ask the question: is early maturity associated with early onset of ripening or with increased rate of sugar accumulation? Methods and Results: We used records of grape juice total soluble solids (TSS) for Chardonnay, Shiraz and Cabernet Sauvignon collected in commercial vineyards between 1995 and 2009. The combination of 15 vintages and three climatic regions yielded a range of average seasonal temperature between 15.5 and 20.5°C. Using boundary functions of TTS versus time, we derived the onset and rate of increase in TSS, and the time of maturity set at 12 °Bé for comparative purposes. Pooled across varieties, the rate of change in maturity was -9.8±0.94°C/d. Shifts in onset accounted for 86% of the variation in time of maturity and the rate of ripening for the remaining variation. Conclusion: Early maturity associated with higher temperature (and related factors including higher radiation and higher vapour pressure deficit) is primarily driven by early onset of ripening under a wide range of production systems in south-eastern Australia. Significance of the Study: Viticultural practices aiming at delaying maturity to counteract the effect of high temperature, high radiation and high vapour pressure deficit are more likely to be successful if they target the onset of ripening. © 2011 Australian Society of Viticulture and Oenology Inc.


News Article | October 30, 2015
Site: www.reuters.com

Bunches of grapes hang from the vine in a vineyard in Alsace, before their harvest in Orschwihr, France, in this September 26, 2015 file photo. A tractor makes its way through vineyards which produce grapes for the Puisseguin-Saint Emillion wine as fair weather continues during the autumn season in Puisseguin, near Bordeaux, France, in this October 23, 2015 file photo. Late autumn colours in vineyards mark a change in the season in Soultz in the Alsace region of eastern France, in this October 22, 2015 file photo Bunches of grapes hang from the vine in a vineyard in Alsace, before their harvest in Orschwihr, France, in this September 26, 2015 file photo. PARIS Good news for wine drinkers: a leading international body says grape vines are a hardy little number and can survive climate change, at least over the medium term. Earlier harvesting, changes in grape varieties and new wine-making processes have already helped counter the impact of the harsher weather hitting vineyards across the globe, the head of the International Organisation of Vine and Wine (OIV) says. "Wine producers all over the world have adapted to the changes and the plant has a capacity of adjustment that you can find in no other plant," OIV Director General Jean-Marie Aurand told Reuters in an interview. He cited the example of the Canary island of Lanzarote where vines are grown in lava which absorbs overnight dew - virtually the sole water they receive in the summer - and releases it during the day. In China, he said, more than 80 percent of production acreage is located in regions where temperatures can drop below minus 30 degrees Celsius (-22 degrees Fahrenheit) in winter. Growers cover vines to protect them and uncover them when spring comes. Some winemakers, meanwhile, are shifting the way they produce wine. Australia's Treasury Wine Estates Ltd, for example, is testing technology to water vines underground and is expanding fermentation capacity to combat the impact of climate change on its vineyards around the world. "You can adapt to climate change or you can react to it," Treasury Wine Chief Supply Officer Stuart McNab said at a Reuters Global Climate Change Summit last year. "You've got time to react, but you've got to know what's happening." Despite the worries of many producers, notably in the Champagne region, Aurand was not very concerned for the future of wines sold under protected designation labels that tie them to the soil and viticulture practices of a specific region such as the Appellation d'Origine Controlee (AOC) system in France. "We have today other strains and cultivation techniques, so I'm not worried in the short or mid-term on this question, which does not mean we should not consider the issue of climate change as a whole," Aurand said. It was too early to give an outlook for 2050, he said. The OIV sees global wine output rising 2 percent in 2015 to 275.7 million hectolitres (mhl), Aurand said. A 10-percent rebound in Italy's output meant it would regain its position as leading world producer after losing it to France last year due to a weather-hit grape crop. OIV gave an initial consumption forecast for 2015 at between 235.7 and 248.8 mhl, down from around 240 mhl last year. As opposed to western European countries where consumers are drinking less wine, consumption would rise again in the United States, which became the world's largest consumer in 2013, it said.


News Article | October 30, 2015
Site: news.yahoo.com

Bunches of grapes hang from the vine in a vineyard in Alsace, before their harvest in Orschwihr, France, in this September 26, 2015 file photo. REUTERS/Jacky Naegelen/Files More PARIS (Reuters) - Good news for wine drinkers: a leading international body says grape vines are a hardy little number and can survive climate change, at least over the medium term. Earlier harvesting, changes in grape varieties and new wine-making processes have already helped counter the impact of the harsher weather hitting vineyards across the globe, the head of the International Organisation of Vine and Wine (OIV) says. "Wine producers all over the world have adapted to the changes and the plant has a capacity of adjustment that you can find in no other plant," OIV Director General Jean-Marie Aurand told Reuters in an interview. He cited the example of the Canary island of Lanzarote where vines are grown in lava which absorbs overnight dew - virtually the sole water they receive in the summer - and releases it during the day. In China, he said, more than 80 percent of production acreage is located in regions where temperatures can drop below minus 30 degrees Celsius (-22 degrees Fahrenheit) in winter. Growers cover vines to protect them and uncover them when spring comes. Some winemakers, meanwhile, are shifting the way they produce wine. Australia's Treasury Wine Estates Ltd, for example, is testing technology to water vines underground and is expanding fermentation capacity to combat the impact of climate change on its vineyards around the world. "You can adapt to climate change or you can react to it," Treasury Wine Chief Supply Officer Stuart McNab said at a Reuters Global Climate Change Summit last year. "You've got time to react, but you've got to know what's happening." Despite the worries of many producers, notably in the Champagne region, Aurand was not very concerned for the future of wines sold under protected designation labels that tie them to the soil and viticulture practices of a specific region such as the Appellation d'Origine Controlee (AOC) system in France. "We have today other strains and cultivation techniques, so I'm not worried in the short or mid-term on this question, which does not mean we should not consider the issue of climate change as a whole," Aurand said. It was too early to give an outlook for 2050, he said. The OIV sees global wine output rising 2 percent in 2015 to 275.7 million hectolitres (mhl), Aurand said. A 10-percent rebound in Italy's output meant it would regain its position as leading world producer after losing it to France last year due to a weather-hit grape crop. OIV gave an initial consumption forecast for 2015 at between 235.7 and 248.8 mhl, down from around 240 mhl last year. As opposed to western European countries where consumers are drinking less wine, consumption would rise again in the United States, which became the world's largest consumer in 2013, it said.


News Article | October 28, 2015
Site: news.yahoo.com

Bunches of grapes hang from the vine in a vineyard in Alsace, before their harvest in Orschwihr, France, in this September 26, 2015 file photo. REUTERS/Jacky Naegelen/Files More PARIS (Reuters) - Good news for wine drinkers: a leading international body says grape vines are a hardy little number and can survive climate change, at least over the medium term. Earlier harvesting, changes in grape varieties and new wine-making processes have already helped counter the impact of the harsher weather hitting vineyards across the globe, the head of the International Organization of Vine and Wine (OIV) says. "Wine producers all over the world have adapted to the changes and the plant has a capacity of adjustment that you can find in no other plant," OIV Director General Jean-Marie Aurand told Reuters in an interview. He cited the example of the Canary island of Lanzarote where vines are grown in lava which absorbs overnight dew - virtually the sole water they receive in the summer - and releases it during the day. In China, he said, more than 80 percent of production acreage is located in regions where temperatures can drop below minus 30 degrees Celsius (-22 degrees Fahrenheit) in winter. Growers cover vines to protect them and uncover them when spring comes. Some winemakers, meanwhile, are shifting the way they produce wine. Australia's Treasury Wine Estates Ltd, for example, is testing technology to water vines underground and is expanding fermentation capacity to combat the impact of climate change on its vineyards around the world. "You can adapt to climate change or you can react to it," Treasury Wine Chief Supply Officer Stuart McNab said at a Reuters Global Climate Change Summit earlier this month. "You've got time to react, but you've got to know what's happening." Despite the worries of many producers, notably in the Champagne region, Aurand was not very concerned for the future of wines sold under protected designation labels that tie them to the soil and viticulture practices of a specific region such as the Appellation d'Origine Controlee (AOC) system in France. "We have today other strains and cultivation techniques, so I'm not worried in the short or mid-term on this question, which does not mean we should not consider the issue of climate change as a whole," Aurand said. It was too early to give an outlook for 2050, he said. The OIV sees global wine output rising 2 percent in 2015 to 275.7 million hectoliters (mhl), Aurand said. A 10-percent rebound in Italy's output meant it would regain its position as leading world producer after losing it to France last year due to a weather-hit grape crop. OIV gave an initial consumption forecast for 2015 at between 235.7 and 248.8 mhl, down from around 240 mhl last year. As opposed to western European countries where consumers are drinking less wine, consumption would rise again in the United States, which became the world's largest consumer in 2013, it said.

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