Treasury Wine Estates

Magill, Australia

Treasury Wine Estates

Magill, Australia
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Hjelmeland A.K.,University of California at Davis | Collins T.S.,University of California at Davis | Miles J.L.,Treasury Wine Estates | Wylie P.L.,Agilent Technologies | And 2 more authors.
American Journal of Enology and Viticulture | Year: 2012

Haloanisole contamination causes development of "cork taint," a musty off-aroma in affected wines. Cork taint results in significant economic loss for the wine and allied industries every year, therefore extensive quality-control procedures have been established at wineries and cork production facilities to monitor levels of haloanisoles in cork products. Because of the extremely low human sensory thresholds for these compounds (~1 to 4 ng/L for 2,4,6-trichloroanisole in wine), highly sensitive analytical methods are needed to detect the haloanisoles at threshold concentrations or lower. We present a method for the simultaneous analysis of four haloanisoles in wine-2,4,6-trichloroanisole (TCA); 2,3,4,6-tetrachloroanisole (TeCA); 2,3,4,5,6-pentachloroanisole (PCA); and 2,4,6-tribromoanisole (TBA)-that have been frequently associated with cork taint aromas in wines. Headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) coupled to a GC-triple quadrupole MS was used to obtain limits of quantification that were ≤1.0 ng/L and below sensory threshold levels. The method is fully automated, requires no sample preparation other than the addition of internal standards, and is high throughput, with a 10-min extraction time and a 5-min incubation prior to extraction. This method can be readily adapted to screen for haloanisoles in cork extracts. © 2012 by the American Society for Enology and Viticulture. All rights reserved.


News Article | November 29, 2016
Site: www.newsmaker.com.au

The global alcoholic beverages market has been witnessing consistent growth over the years, despite fluctuating economic conditions around the world. Transparency Market Research, in a report titled “Alcoholic Beverage Market - Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends, and Forecast 2015–2021”, notes that sales are likely to remain steady in the coming years as well. The growing economic prosperity in developing countries, strengthening distribution channels and purchase channels, and evolving consumer lifestyles are responsible for the expansion of the alcoholic beverages market. The key product categories of alcoholic beverages are beer, wine, and spirits, which include vodka, whiskey, and rum. Beer is by far the most commonly consumed alcoholic beverage, driven mainly by aggressive advertising and marketing activities and constant improvement in quality. TMR finds that the top six beer makers account for over half the global market for alcoholic beverages, hinting at the considerable growth of this product segment. On the basis of geography, the report studies North America, Europe, Asia Pacific and the Rest of the World as the key segments of the global alcoholic beverages market. Although Europe and North America are mature markets, they continue to be major revenue generators in the market. However, companies are looking to invest in markets where the unmet need is higher and where there is immense scope for growth. Asia Pacific is one of the most lucrative markets in this respect, owing mainly to the rising consumption of alcohol among the urban youth in countries such as China and India. Eastern Europe and Africa are also blossoming markets for alcoholic beverages thanks to a steady pace of Westernization and an increase in the youth population. There are several international and local players operating in the global alcoholic beverages market, making it a highly competitive and lucrative one. Product differentiation and competitive pricing are two of the key strategies adopted by companies to stay on top and garner a larger share of the consumer base. The launch of new products to cater to the health-conscious consumer is a recent trend noted in the alcoholic beverages market. Heineken, Constellation Brands, Bacardi, Treasury Wine Estates, Carlsberg, Accolade Wines, Diageo, Beam Suntory, E. & J. Gallo Winery, Anheuser-Busch, SABMiller, China Resource Enterprise, The Wine Group, Torres, and Pernod Ricard are some of the more prominent names in the alcoholic beverages market. These players are studied in depth, highlighting their strengths and weaknesses in addition to the threats and opportunities in store. The key strategies and collaborations in the recent past have been evaluated to understand their impact on the performance of a company and its financial standing. The latest product portfolio of a given company has also been studied to offer readers a clear picture of the competition in the alcoholic beverages market.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: techcrunch.com

The ancient craft of wine making conjures romantic notions of hand-picked vines, and bare feet crushing grapes. However, wine production today is a thoroughly high-tech affair. Degree programs in viticulture and oenology, from Cornell University to UC Davis, reflect advances in the industry. Professors and courses there now focus on topics like “environmental control, and modified atmospheres,” “the genetic engineering of industrial microorganisms,” or “analytical instrumentation,” to name a few. What wine makers are going after with applied technology and science is a more profitable piece of an already sizable market. Consumers spent $38 billion on U.S.-made wines alone in 2015 according to the annual Wine Industry Metrics report by Wines & Vines Analytics. Using tech and science to gain every possible advantage can help producers keep their costs and prices down, their environmental footprint small, and their wines as high-quality as possible. More and better data, if analyzed properly, can also help wineries cope with extreme weather, from droughts to floods. Farmers of every kind have used government research and data from agencies like the US Department of Agriculture and the Environmental Protection Agency in planning and managing their crops. President Donald Trump has required that agencies (including the USDA and EPA) stop releasing their findings to the public until they go through administrative reviews and approvals. Although most farms are already paying tech companies and consultants for some of the data that they use to make business decisions, the new administration’s “gag rules” could drive even more demand, and require farmers to spend more time and money on technology. One of the best-known ways to gather agricultural data these days is seen in the skies. Vineyards and other farms have long used camera-strapped planes, helicopters or drones, and data gathered by satellites, to capture what’s going on in their fields below. But there’s an equally exciting new class of sensors, apps, and other hardware used in the fields, too. TechCrunch took a tour of some of the major vineyards operated by Treasury Wine Estates in Napa Valley to get a first hand look at what’s state of the art. For the unfamiliar, Treasury Wine Estates is the parent company behind some mainstream and critically acclaimed wines including: Beringer, Sterling Vineyards and Stags’ Leap. The wines are produced by separate teams and at distinct vineyards, each with their own processes and approaches. In some of its vineyards, Treasury Wine Estates uses mobile apps to connect managers with workers in the field; tractors outfitted with high tech systems that allow them to cut away debris, harvest and sort grapes efficiently; ground-based sensors that can gauge the health of their soil or plants, track the weather, and help manage irrigation; and truck-mounted lasers that take precise measurements of vines and leaves. Treasury Wine Estates Director of Innovation Will Drayton first showed us weather and plant sensors his company is using in select vineyards, which are made by Arable. The startup’s hardware, called the Pulsepod, may look familiar. It was created in partnership with Fred Bould, who was also behind the Nest thermostat, smoke and carbon monoxide detector, as well as Fitbit, GoPro and Roku products. One thing Drayton said that field workers and he appreciate about the Pulsepod is that it’s easy to clean up, including when birds drop waste and debris into it. You don’t think about this much when you’re working a desk job, but earlier model rain gauges out in the field could be negatively effected by this natural debris in terms of their performance. They were hard to clean out thanks to a design that was anything but portable, and included lots of wires pointing up towards the sky. By contrast the Arable PulsePod is solar-powered, lightweight, sensor laden top to bottom, and shaped like a small Frisbee. Using everything from a radiometer to an acoustic gauge it can measure details like precise rainfall or the color of grapes on the vine. (We previously wrote about the company and its angel investors.) Besides a sleek industrial design, the PulsePod is connected to Arable’s cloud-based software, which uses deep learning to help farmers make accurate predictions about crops based on all the data they gather on the ground. Drayton next introduced TechCrunch to an agtech consultant with Fruitition Sciences, Brandon Burk, who was on-site scanning vines. The company uses–what else in the name of fun on a farm with tech? Truck-mounted lasers! Its “physiocap rig” works like this, Burk said: “It has two lasers on it, one sending and one receiving… Every time something disrupts the flow [of light] that the lasers are sending, it’s taking a measurement. ” Fruition Science’s physiocap does not count clusters of fruit, but focuses strictly on vine growth and balance, known in the trade as the ratio of “fruit to shoot.” The number of vines, leaves and width of the vines can predict how much fruit a farmer will get and how healthy the plants will be long-term. Correlating vine data with information about drought, storms, and inputs– or the different fertilizers, pesticides and seeds that may be used throughout a season– can help wine makers home in on what works in their field to achieve a certain taste and mouthfeel, every harvest. It can also help them make adjustments when weather drastically changes. While we visited after the mayhem of harvesting season, TechCrunch also took a spin around a farm lot at Treasury Wine Estates where heavy agricultural equipment was parked, including a special harvester made by Pellenc, a French company whose name would mean “lever” in English. The harvester has a range of accessories attached to it. “This vehicle is basically the Swiss army knife of tractors,” Drayton said. With its many attachments, the Pellenc harvesters allow farmers to spray, mow, prune then automatically and cleanly sort the best grapes into a container. One attachment is like a giant metal shelf nearly perforated with berry-shaped holes. The shelf is positioned under the vines where it shakes, and detaches just the ripe and ready to harvest grapes. The grapes are mechanically sifted without damage into a giant container below. Up by the driver’s seat, the company had outfitted its Pellenc harvesters with an iPad, which displays geo-referenced maps that route drivers to the correct part of the field where they need to pick fruit, irrigate or apply fertilizers. Instead of turning to startups and partners for this one, Treasury Wine Estates developed their own mapping and routing app, Drayton said. A Vineyard Manager for Treasury Wine Estates, Shawn Ramsay, observed: “Younger people are much better at driving these machines because they grew up on video games. Especially with this iPad display, it feels like you’re driving around with a joystick, or a game controller, not a steering wheel.” Finally, Drayton took TechCrunch out to launch a drone to run a multi-spectral, aerial survey of the vineyards. The multi-spectral readings, he said, reveal differences in the field for each vineyard unfolding in real-time, identifying irrigation leaks, or taking a quick reading of what sections of the field may be ripening first. The company uses this technology to identify early signs of diseased vines, and get them off the “block,” before they infect any others. The potential of early detection is to make more and better wines without needing as much labor, water, pesticides or fertilizers to do so. The drone used by Treasury Wine Estates was a research grade-model from drone market leaders DJI equipped with a high-definition camera from Parrot SA and operated using software from agriculture specialists Skycision. According to Skycision CEO Brendan Carroll, the company’s software-as-a-service helps farmers identify crop stress early in their growing season so they can head it off at the pass. “Our app integrates imagery from all kinds of aerial systems, planes, satellites and drones, to help farmers find pests, diseases and weeds much better than they can just walking the fields,” Carroll said. The app also lets farmers “click to fly,” Drayton noted, meaning they don’t have to set drop points and tell a drone where to go in real time. They just define an area on a map where they want to capture imagery and show up with the drone. Integrating different data sources to show an easy-to-read map to farmers proves harder than something like lining up layers in PhotoShop. Skycision’s software calibrates visual data to take into account the intensity of light on a given day, and the contours of the land below, among other things. Without this crucial step, images of a vineyard compared over time could lead farmers to wrong conclusions. “It would look like your crops died overnight when really, you had a canopy reflecting differently one day because of the clouds, versus the bright sunlight the day before” Carroll said. Pittsburgh, Penn.-based Skycision works with growers of berries and grapes, which are crops that are very expensive to raise but also have a high-yield value per acre, he said. That’s because losing even a tiny portion of a field to pests, diseases or weeds causes a bad hit to the farm’s margins. And high value crops like grapes tend to see an aggressive spread when certain diseases show up, causing farmers to have to rip out huge amounts of vines to contain them. More precise data helps them rip out only what they must, or better yet, prevent the disease from ever spreading. While we didn’t have time to see every technology in action, Drayton said one of his favorite machines to watch at work for Treasury Wine Estates is an optical berry sorter, which employs cameras and computer vision software to literally see, and quickly evaluate the quality of, all the grapes coming down a conveyor belt. The machine, made by Bucher Vaslin in Santa Rosa, Calif., sorts the good grapes from the bad by directing tiny puffs of air that shoot them into one container or the other. A puff to the right, and a blueberry-like grape falls into the bin that will soon be crushed for pinot noir. A puff to the left, and a berry so dry it could be called a raisin goes to a bin that’s bound for compost. “It really is like a futuristic take on that I Love Lucy episode with the bonbons,” Drayton laughed. Machines may never catch up to the human palate when it comes to discerning what tastes best. But at least we know that the ancient art of winemaking pairs well with the future.


Marangon M.,The Australian Wine Research Institute | Lucchetta M.,University of Padua | Duan D.,Fosters Group | Stockdale V.J.,Treasury Wine Estates | And 5 more authors.
Australian Journal of Grape and Wine Research | Year: 2012

Backgrounds and Aims: Bentonite is commonly added to white wines to remove the grape proteins responsible for haze formation. Despite being effective, this technique has drawbacks; thus, new solutions are desirable. The ability of carrageenan and pectin to remove heat-unstable grape proteins, and the impact that such addition has on the physicochemical and sensorial profile of a wine were assessed. Methods and Results: Carrageenan and pectin were added separately or in combination to a Chardonnay juice prior to fermentation. Both adsorbents removed proteins (up to 75%), thus increasing wine protein stability. Carrageenan was more effective than pectin at increasing wine protein stability. Conclusions: Pectin and carrageenan removed protein and partially stabilized the samples of the wine. Significance of the Study: Pre-fermentation addition of pectin or carrageenan may provide the wine industry with an alternative protein stabilization procedure. © 2012 The Australian Wine Research Institute.


News Article | October 31, 2016
Site: www.newsmaker.com.au

MarketStudyReport.com adds “Global Alcoholic Drinks Market 2016-2020” new report to its research database. The report spread across 105 pages with table and figures in it. The Research analysts forecast the global alcoholic drinks market to grow at a CAGR of 1.7% during the period 2016-2020. The global alcoholic drinks market will have a moderate growth rate during the forecast period. This is due to various reasons such as growing demand for premium products, innovative marketing campaigns by vendors, and increase in demand for low-alcohol-content drinks. Dominance of the beer segment in the alcoholic drinks market in terms of volume will come down during the forecast period due to the increase in demand for wines and spirits, especially among younger and health-conscious consumers. Browse full table of contents and data tables at https://www.marketstudyreport.com/reports/global-alcoholic-drinks-market-2016-2020/ Covered in this report The report covers the present scenario and the growth prospects of the global alcoholic drinks market for 2016-2020. To calculate the market size, the report has taken into consideration revenue generated from the retail sales of alcoholic drinks globally. It also includes the market size based on volume, which has been calculated based on the retail consumption of alcoholic drinks. The market is divided into the following segments based on geography: - Americas - APAC - EMEA The Research report, Global Alcoholics Drinks Market 2016-2020, has been prepared based on an in-depth market analysis with inputs from industry experts. The report covers the market landscape and its growth prospects over the coming years. The report also includes a discussion of the key vendors operating in this market. Key vendors - Anheuser Busch InBev - Accolade Wines - Bacardi - Beam-Suntory - Carlsberg Group - Constellation Brands - China Resource Enterprise - Diageo - Heineken - E. & J. Gallo Winery - Pernod Ricard - SAB Miller - The Wine Group - Torres - Treasury Wine Estates - Vino Concha y Toro Other prominent vendors - ABD - Aceo - Aha Yeto - Arcus - Asahi Breweries - Belvedere Vodka - Ben Nevis Distillery - Boston Beer - Camino Real Distillery - Cape North - Christiania Spirits - Cia Tequileria Los Valores - G. G. Yuengling & Son - Distell Group - Duvel Moortgat - Edrington - Glenmorangie - Global Drinks Finland - Gordon & MacPhail - Hacienda La Capilla - Harpoon Brewery - Harvey's of Edinburgh International - Heavy Water International - Iceberg Vodka - International Beverage Holdings - Isle of Arran - John Distilleries - Jose Cuervo - K V Spirits - Lagunitas Brewing - Marie Brizard Wine & Spirits Scandinavia - Purity Vodka AB - Radio Khaitan - Saturnus AB - Shiva Distilleries - Sierra Tequila - Soyuz Victan - SPI Group - Spirits of Gold AB - Synergy - Tequila Cazadores - Tequila Corralejo - Tequila Quiote - The Blue Nectar - Tilak Nagar Industries - Waldemar Behn - William Grant & Sons - World Food and Bev Group - ZYR Vodka Market driver - Innovative marketing campaigns by vendors - For a full, detailed list, view our report Market challenge - High taxation on alcohol - For a full, detailed list, view our report Market trend - Increase in demand for Irish whiskey and American bourbon - For a full, detailed list, view our report Key questions answered in this report - What will the market size be in 2020 and what will the growth rate be? - What are the key market trends? - What is driving this market? - What are the challenges to market growth? - Who are the key vendors in this market space? - What are the market opportunities and threats faced by the key vendors? - What are the strengths and weaknesses of the key vendors? To receive personalized assistance write to us @ [email protected] with the report title in the subject line along with your questions or call us at +1 866-764-2150


WiseGuyReports.Com Publish a New Market Research Report On – “Alcoholic Drinks Industry Global Production,Growth,Share,Demand and Applications Market Research Report to 2020”. The analysts forecast the global alcoholic drinks market to grow at a CAGR of 1.7% during the period 2016-2020. The global alcoholic drinks market will have a moderate growth rate during the forecast period. This is due to various reasons such as growing demand for premium products, innovative marketing campaigns by vendors, and increase in demand for low-alcohol-content drinks.  Dominance of the beer segment in the alcoholic drinks market in terms of volume will come down during the forecast period due to the increase in demand for wines and spirits, especially among younger and health-conscious consumers. For more information or any query mail at [email protected] Covered in this report  The report covers the present scenario and the growth prospects of the global alcoholic drinks market for 2016-2020. To To calculate the market size, the report has taken into consideration revenue generated from the retail sales of alcoholic drinks globally. It also includes the market size based on volume, which has been calculated based on the retail consumption of alcoholic drinks.  The market is divided into the following segments based on geography:  • Americas  • APAC  • EMEA  The report, Global Alcoholics Drinks Market 2016-2020, has been prepared based on an in-depth market analysis with inputs from industry experts. The report covers the market landscape and its growth prospects over the coming years. The report also includes a discussion of the key vendors operating in this market.  Key vendors  • Anheuser Busch InBev  • Accolade Wines  • Bacardi  • Beam-Suntory  • Carlsberg Group  • Constellation Brands  • China Resource Enterprise  • Diageo  • Heineken  • E. & J. Gallo Winery  • Pernod Ricard  • SAB Miller  • The Wine Group  • Torres  • Treasury Wine Estates  • Vino Concha y Toro  Other prominent vendors  • ABD  • Aceo  • Aha Yeto  • Arcus  • Asahi Breweries  • Belvedere Vodka  • Ben Nevis Distillery  • Boston Beer  • Camino Real Distillery  • Cape North  • Christiania Spirits  • Cia Tequileria Los Valores  • G. G. Yuengling & Son  • Distell Group  • Duvel Moortgat  • Edrington  • Glenmorangie  • Global Drinks Finland  • Gordon & MacPhail  • Hacienda La Capilla  • Harpoon Brewery  • Harvey’s of Edinburgh International  • Heavy Water International  • Iceberg Vodka  • International Beverage Holdings  • Isle of Arran  • John Distilleries  • Jose Cuervo  • K V Spirits  • Lagunitas Brewing  • Marie Brizard Wine & Spirits Scandinavia  • Purity Vodka AB  • Radio Khaitan  • Saturnus AB  • Shiva Distilleries  • Sierra Tequila  • Soyuz Victan  • SPI Group  • Spirits of Gold AB  • Synergy  • Tequila Cazadores  • Tequila Corralejo  • Tequila Quiote  • The Blue Nectar  • Tilak Nagar Industries  • Waldemar Behn  • William Grant & Sons  • World Food and Bev Group  • ZYR Vodka Market driver  • Innovative marketing campaigns by vendors  • For a full, detailed list, view our report  Market challenge  • High taxation on alcohol  • For a full, detailed list, view our report  Market trend  • Increase in demand for Irish whiskey and American bourbon  • For a full, detailed list, view our report  Key questions answered in this report  • What will the market size be in 2020 and what will the growth rate be?  • What are the key market trends?  • What is driving this market?  • What are the challenges to market growth?  • Who are the key vendors in this market space?  • What are the market opportunities and threats faced by the key vendors?  • What are the strengths and weaknesses of the key vendors? PART 08: Geographical segmentation  • Smoothies market in Americas  • Smoothies market in EMEA  • Smoothies market in APAC PART 09: Key leading countries  • Smoothies market in US  • Smoothies market in UK  • Smoothies market in Australia  • Smoothies market in Canada For more information or any query mail at [email protected] Wise Guy Reports is part of the Wise Guy Consultants Pvt. Ltd. and offers premium progressive statistical surveying, market research reports, analysis & forecast data for industries and governments around the globe. Wise Guy Reports features an exhaustive list of market research reports from hundreds of publishers worldwide. We boast a database spanning virtually every market category and an even more comprehensive collection of market research reports under these categories and sub-categories.


Butzke C.E.,Purdue University | Vogt E.E.,eProvenance | Chacon-Rodriguez L.,Treasury Wine Estates
Journal of Wine Research | Year: 2012

The exposure of wine to elevated temperatures has a profound impact on its aging reactions and its sensory quality, shelf life and healthfulness. This study monitored the exposure of wine to heat during commercial shipments through the national distribution chain from wineries to wholesalers across the USA under extreme but realistic conditions. The results document the exposure of wine shipments in regular non-refrigerated containers with different types of external and internal insulation. During the months of summer and early autumn, wines shipped to or via hot geographic locations were frequently exposed to temperatures above 24°C and often for extended periods of time. Under the most extreme shipping conditions, wines would have been exposed to temperatures of up to 44°C. Notable diurnal fluctuations (4-21°C) were observed. The accumulated heat exposure of the wines was calculated using ethyl carbamate formation as a wine quality indicator and different kinetic models for wine aging were applied to make a comparison with wine storage under empirically ideal cellar conditions. These calculations suggest that some wines were exposed to heat during transport that corresponded to an added bottle age between 1 and 18 months when compared with conventional cellar storage. © 2012 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.


News Article | November 27, 2015
Site: www.reuters.com

A man works at the Matetic vineyard in Casablanca valley, west of Santiago city, Chile, in this October 30, 2015 file photo. As a U.N. conference in Paris next week tries to limit climate change, wine makers from France to Australia are already changing their time-honoured methods, or even uprooting whole vineyards, as long-established weather patterns alter and the temperature rises. Already, English sparkling white wine and even Nordic reds and whites have claimed shelf space in the specialist stores. But increasingly, many of the more traditional labels may begin to taste different as drier, hotter summers change the properties of their grapes. Warmer temperatures ripen the grapes faster: the harvest in Bordeaux already takes place about 10 days earlier than in 1980; in Champagne, 15 days; and in Australia, eight. According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, 1983-2012 is likely to have been the warmest 30-year period of the last 1400 years in the Northern Hemisphere. And while global average temperatures rose 0.7 degrees Celsius (1.3 Fahrenheit) between 1850 and 1986, they are predicted to leap 0.5C in the next 20 years alone. Faster growth tends to boost the grapes' sugar content, and therefore the alcohol level, and reduce the acidity. This is generally good news in cool regions such as northern Europe, including Germany and the French regions of Champagne and Val de Loire, although it may subtly change the taste of their wines. Southern England, the northernmost frontier for vineyards just a generation ago, has seen a rapid expansion since the 1980s thanks to its warmer summers, and especially since 2000, predominantly in sparkling wines that compete with Champagne. "In some areas they have been making a similar kind of wine for hundreds of years, so I'm sure they will cope - but it is an opportunity for us in England to make a unique kind of wine," said Sam Lindo, chairman of the UK Vineyards Association. England has long since abdicated the 'northernmost' title. Warmer temperatures and new vines that can resist colder winters are bringing wine production into Nordic countries, although the risk of a soggy summer is still a high one there. "There is this myth about the cold weather here, the moose and the polar bears," said Goran Amnegard, from the Blaxsta winery near the Swedish capital Stockholm, which sells as far afield as Hong Kong. "We have had more or less Mediterranean summers." But many traditionally warmer regions could do without the extra heat. Australian winemakers, for instance, are moving south to the island of Tasmania. Average temperatures in Australia's main wine regions are projected to increase by between 0.3C and 1.7C by 2030, reducing grape quality by between 12 and 57 percent, according to the national science agency, CSIRO. Treasury Wine Estates, the world's largest standalone wine company, sold its vineyards in the Hunter Valley north of Sydney in 2013, worried that the region would become "hot and dry and expensive", and bought White Hills in Tasmania. Some producers in Chile, the world's fourth largest wine exporter, have also moved their vineyards to cooler, wetter climes further south. Others are moving their vines uphill. Shifting whole vineyards is not so easy, though, for the world's top three producers, France, Italy and Spain. In France, for instance, half the output is regulated by the "Appellation of Controlled Origin" or AOC system, born in 1935, which defines each label by its "terroir", or unique soil, climate, and viticulture practices. Much fine-tuning has already been done, in irrigation, planting density and pruning. But any substantial change, such as changing a grape variety, means applying for a new AOC designation with proof of established quality, a process that takes years. And in warmer regions where sugar levels are already high, the extra alcohol content of the resulting wine could also become a problem. "If wines are too warm, too alcoholic, it will hold back consumers; one or two glasses and they will stop," said Nicolas de Saint-Exupery, a producer in the southern French region of Languedoc, seen as vulnerable to global warming. In these areas, winemakers and scientists are working out ways to reduce alcohol while preserving the flavor. This might mean shading the grapes, changing irrigation practices, or even artificially removing alcohol from finished wine. The European season also appears more unpredictable than before. "Changes in the climate used to be sporadic; now every summer is different," said Fabio Lambruschi, producer of white Vermentino wine in the Italian region of Liguria. Italy is the world's largest wine producer, and universities and winemakers there are trying to cope with the changes by breeding new vines that are resistant to diseases linked to bad weather. The industry's collective memory is still traumatized by "phylloxera", a tiny pest that ravaged vineyards across Europe in the late 19th century. Although the Great Wine Blight all but wiped out French wine growing, it did eventually recover, and the head of the International Organization of Vine and Wine (OIV), Jean-Marie Aurand, says his industry is still resourceful. "We have today other strains and cultivation techniques, so I'm not worried in the short or mid-term," he said. The long term may be another question altogether, though. The Paris conference already seems certain to miss, by some distance, its goal of limiting a rise in the global average temperature to 2C above pre-industrial times. Half that rise has already happened. Another two degrees, says Jean-Marc Touzard, coordinator of a program on wine and climate change at France's INRA research institute, will simply "blow up the French vineyard map".


News Article | November 30, 2016
Site: www.newsmaker.com.au

This report studies Red wine in Global Market, especially in North America, Europe, China, Japan, Southeast Asia and India, with production, revenue, consumption, import and export in these regions, from 2011 to 2015, and forecast to 2021. This report focuses on top manufacturers in global market, with production, price, revenue and market share for each manufacturer, covering  Lafite  Romanée-Conti  Chateau Latour  Chateau Haut-Brion  Chateau Margaux  Chateau Mouton Rothschild  Chateau Condamine Bertrand  HALL  WALT Wines  Jacob's Creek  Angelus  Concha y Toro  Penfolds Winery  Chateau Pontet-Canet  E.&J. Gallo Winery  Casella Family Brands  Treasury Wine Estates  Accolade Wines By types, the market can be split into  Type I  Type II  Type III By Application, the market can be split into  Application 1  Application 2  Application 3 By Regions, this report covers (we can add the regions/countries as you want)  North America  China  Europe  Southeast Asia  Japan  India Global Red wine Market Professional Survey Report 2016  1 Industry Overview of Red wine  1.1 Definition and Specifications of Red wine  1.1.1 Definition of Red wine  1.1.2 Specifications of Red wine  1.2 Classification of Red wine  1.2.1 Type I  1.2.2 Type II  1.2.3 Type III  1.3 Applications of Red wine  1.3.1 Application 1  1.3.2 Application 2  1.3.3 Application 3  1.4 Market Segment by Regions  1.4.1 North America  1.4.2 China  1.4.3 Europe  1.4.4 Southeast Asia  1.4.5 Japan  1.4.6 India 2 Manufacturing Cost Structure Analysis of Red wine  2.1 Raw Material and Suppliers  2.2 Manufacturing Cost Structure Analysis of Red wine  2.3 Manufacturing Process Analysis of Red wine  2.4 Industry Chain Structure of Red wine 3 Technical Data and Manufacturing Plants Analysis of Red wine  3.1 Capacity and Commercial Production Date of Global Red wine Major Manufacturers in 2015  3.2 Manufacturing Plants Distribution of Global Red wine Major Manufacturers in 2015  3.3 R&D Status and Technology Source of Global Red wine Major Manufacturers in 2015  3.4 Raw Materials Sources Analysis of Global Red wine Major Manufacturers in 2015 4 Global Red wine Overall Market Overview  4.1 2011-2016E Overall Market Analysis  4.2 Capacity Analysis  4.2.1 2011-2016E Global Red wine Capacity and Growth Rate Analysis  4.2.2 2015 Red wine Capacity Analysis (Company Segment)  4.3 Sales Analysis  4.3.1 2011-2016E Global Red wine Sales and Growth Rate Analysis  4.3.2 2015 Red wine Sales Analysis (Company Segment)  4.4 Sales Price Analysis  4.4.1 2011-2016E Global Red wine Sales Price  4.4.2 2015 Red wine Sales Price Analysis (Company Segment) For more information or any query mail at [email protected]


Notes:  Production, means the output of Red wine  Revenue, means the sales value of Red wine This report studies Red wine in Global Market, especially in North America, Europe, China, Japan, Southeast Asia and India, with production, revenue, consumption, import and export in these regions, from 2011 to 2015, and forecast to 2021. This report focuses on top manufacturers in global market, with production, price, revenue and market share for each manufacturer, covering  Lafite  Romanée-Conti  Chateau Latour  Chateau Haut-Brion  Chateau Margaux  Chateau Mouton Rothschild  Chateau Condamine Bertrand  HALL  WALT Wines  Jacob's Creek  Angelus  Concha y Toro  Penfolds Winery  Chateau Pontet-Canet  E.&J. Gallo Winery  Casella Family Brands  Treasury Wine Estates  Accolade Wines By types, the market can be split into  Type I  Type II  Type III By Application, the market can be split into  Application 1  Application 2  Application 3 By Regions, this report covers (we can add the regions/countries as you want)  North America  China  Europe  Southeast Asia  Japan  India Global Red wine Market Professional Survey Report 2016  1 Industry Overview of Red wine  1.1 Definition and Specifications of Red wine  1.1.1 Definition of Red wine  1.1.2 Specifications of Red wine  1.2 Classification of Red wine  1.2.1 Type I  1.2.2 Type II  1.2.3 Type III  1.3 Applications of Red wine  1.3.1 Application 1  1.3.2 Application 2  1.3.3 Application 3  1.4 Market Segment by Regions  1.4.1 North America  1.4.2 China  1.4.3 Europe  1.4.4 Southeast Asia  1.4.5 Japan  1.4.6 India 2 Manufacturing Cost Structure Analysis of Red wine  2.1 Raw Material and Suppliers  2.2 Manufacturing Cost Structure Analysis of Red wine  2.3 Manufacturing Process Analysis of Red wine  2.4 Industry Chain Structure of Red wine 3 Technical Data and Manufacturing Plants Analysis of Red wine  3.1 Capacity and Commercial Production Date of Global Red wine Major Manufacturers in 2015  3.2 Manufacturing Plants Distribution of Global Red wine Major Manufacturers in 2015  3.3 R&D Status and Technology Source of Global Red wine Major Manufacturers in 2015  3.4 Raw Materials Sources Analysis of Global Red wine Major Manufacturers in 2015 4 Global Red wine Overall Market Overview  4.1 2011-2016E Overall Market Analysis  4.2 Capacity Analysis  4.2.1 2011-2016E Global Red wine Capacity and Growth Rate Analysis  4.2.2 2015 Red wine Capacity Analysis (Company Segment)  4.3 Sales Analysis  4.3.1 2011-2016E Global Red wine Sales and Growth Rate Analysis  4.3.2 2015 Red wine Sales Analysis (Company Segment)  4.4 Sales Price Analysis  4.4.1 2011-2016E Global Red wine Sales Price  4.4.2 2015 Red wine Sales Price Analysis (Company Segment) Wise Guy Reports is part of the Wise Guy Consultants Pvt. Ltd. and offers premium progressive statistical surveying, market research reports, analysis & forecast data for industries and governments around the globe. Wise Guy Reports understand how essential statistical surveying information is for your organization or association. Therefore, we have associated with the top publishers and research firms all specialized in specific domains, ensuring you will receive the most reliable and up to date research data available.

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