London, United Kingdom

Transport for London

tfl.gov.uk
London, United Kingdom

Transport for London is the local government body responsible for most aspects of the transport system in Greater London in England. Its role is to implement the transport strategy and to manage transport services across London. Its head office is in the Windsor House in the City of Westminster. Wikipedia.


Time filter

Source Type

News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: www.sciencenewsdaily.org

World’s largest smartphone maker faces stiff competition with launch of contactless system in UKSamsung has finally launched its contactless mobile payment solution in the UK, almost two years after its chief rival Apple Pay rolled out, and a full year after Android Pay.The new contactless payment system allows users of recent Samsung Galaxy S smartphones to pay for goods and services by tapping their handsets on contactless terminals, and pay for travel on Transport for London’s network of tube, train and bus services. Continue reading... Samsung Pay launches in the UK: Everything you need to know It works on public transport services in London, but be careful to avoid a fine Tue 16 May 17 from The Independent It took it's sweet time, but Samsung Pay is now available in the UK. If you own any device in the Galaxy S6, S7 or S8 family, as well as the Galaxy A3 or Galaxy A5, you now have ... Samsung Pay: everything you need to know about the contactless tech Samsung's response to Apple Pay and Android Pay raises more than a few questions, and we've got the answers.


Frost & Sullivan's "Intelligent Mobility" event explores the convergence between the Automotive Industry and Healthcare, Wellness and Wellbeing LONDON, May 18, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- The mass introduction of 5G and satellites will lay the foundation for linking the automotive industry up with other industries outside the traditional ecosystem, paving the way for intelligent, cross-segment partnerships. In future cars will see built in, brought in and beamed in / cloud enabled applications of health wellness and well-being in cars. The first step will be the integration of specific devices, such as air condition humidifiers, heart rate sensors in the seal belts, wearables and health apps. On a next level, the vehicle dashboard or augmented reality enabled windshield can be used to display health data such as warnings or statistics on vitals on the passengers until both ecosystems will be perfectly integrated. Along with this trend comes an increased value of data. OEMs and other providers will find new ways to monetise the huge amounts of data they will have access to. At Frost & Sullivans's industry event Intelligent Mobility on the 29th of June at the Jumeirah Carlton in London, Olivia Price-Walker, Principal Consultant, Visionary Innovation Group, Frost & Sullivan, will offer more insights and valuable best practices on the role Healthcare, Wellness and Wellbeing will take in the cars of the future. "By 2030 the world of healthcare will be unrecognisable - today's data giants IBM, Amazon, Google will be our healthcare providers. Our cars, homes and workplaces will be our hospitals. Most of the world will be genome sequenced and precision medicine will be revolutionising accurate healthcare treatment. Healthcare will be democratised, data based, automated and driven by consumers themselves. As new players flood this market is it time for the mobility industry to make their move." To download the Intelligent Mobility brochure and register to attend the event, please visit www.frost.com/intmob. "Today, you might not find your car and your health have much in common but in future both will share key characteristics – they will be highly digitalised, personalised and individualised – so why not combine them?," finds Olivia Price-Walker. "This can be interpreted as an extension of OEMs long-existing focus on the passengers' safety. Providing the vehicle owner with convenient and easy to manage built-in, brought-in and cloud-enabled applications will be crucial." During its upcoming annual industry event "Intelligent Mobility," taking place on 29th of June at the Jumeirah Carlton Hotel in London, Frost & Sullivan will offer visionary insights into the future of mobility from leading OEMs and tier-one suppliers, prominent industry thinkers, policymakers and disruptors from companies like Jaguar Land Rover, Facebook, Renault–Nissan Alliance, the Financial Times, Mahindra & Mahindra, Transport for London, the Centre for Connected and Autonomous Vehicles, and many more. Besides focusing on Healthcare and Wellbeing, Intelligent Mobility will bring together industry experts on the Future of Mobility Trends, Freight Delivery and Connected and Autonomous Vehicles. Moreover, the event will shed light on carefully selected auto tech startups and their particular business models to showcase the extent of disruption the industry faces. The conference will be complemented by a debate at the House of Lords and the Frost & Sullivan Intelligent Mobility Awards Banquet, a black tie evening and gala dinner. A limited number of complimentary passes are available to members of the media. For more information on Frost & Sullivan's Intelligent Mobility event, please e-mail Jana Schoeneborn, Corporate Communications, at jana.schoeneborn@frost.com. View Frost & Sullivan's video on new mobility business models and the future of Intelligent Mobility here: https://goo.gl/eacFZL Frost & Sullivan, the Growth Partnership Company, works in collaboration with clients to leverage visionary innovation that addresses the global challenges and related growth opportunities that will make or break today's market participants. For more than 50 years, we have been developing growth strategies for the global 1000, emerging businesses, the public sector and the investment community. Contact us: Start the discussion


News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: www.theguardian.com

Samsung has finally launched its contactless mobile payment solution in the UK, almost two years after its chief rival Apple Pay rolled out, and a full year after Android Pay. The new contactless payment system allows users of recent Samsung Galaxy S smartphones to pay for goods and services by tapping their handsets on contactless terminals, and pay for travel on Transport for London’s network of tube, train and bus services. While Samsung Pay was one of the first mobile payment systems to market in South Korea and other countries, it is late to the game in the UK. Android Pay has been available on Samsung and other manufacturers’ Android smartphones since May 2016 in the UK, and has third-party app support with payments inside on-demand food delivery apps, for example. That means Samsung has a lot of ground to make up, according to Ben Wood, head of research for the analysts CCS Insight. Wood said: “Samsung Pay’s primary competition is Android Pay and Samsung will need to offer some very attractive incentives to users if it wants to compete. Even more of a challenge will be getting existing Android Pay users to start using Samsung Pay – it is hard to see why someone would want to switch at present.” It will be crucial for Samsung to convince both new and existing Android Pay users to jump to Samsung Pay, as the firm struggles to break free from being seen as solely a device vendor. Kyle Brown, Samsung’s head of technology launch management, said: “Samsung Pay is one of our key foundations for our services strategy for 2017, along with Bixby, Samsung Connect and Samsung Health.” Samsung is attempting to leverage the company’s secure smartphone system called Knox, which it says is the most secure mobile security platform available and is used by governments including the UK. It is using Knox as a way to convince users that their credit card details required for the mobile payments are secure, a similar narrative to that used by Apple when it launched Apple Pay in the UK in July 2015. Wood said: “Samsung is determined to get consumers to think of it as more than just a company that makes devices. Samsung Pay is just one of several initiatives where it is trying to add value to its products while establishing an ongoing relationship with its customers over the lifetime of a device.” Unlike its rivals Apple and Google, Samsung does not have many value-added services that generate revenue after a user has bought a device. Google’s Play Store sells apps, games, music, books and videos on Samsung and other Android devices, and generates revenue from searches, Android Pay, and other Google apps activities. Apple has full control over the iPhone’s shops and services, from the App Store, iTunes Store, Apple Pay and various iCloud services, collecting service fees or a cut of sales from each. Google’s services, being available on most of the Android devices sold in the west, do not lock users into any one particular brand of smartphone but make it more difficult to leave Android for Apple’s iOS or Microsoft’s Windows phones. For Apple its services increase the inertia for users making it more difficult to switch platforms, while generating meaningful revenue from existing iPhone users, and it is this relationship between smartphones, services and users Samsung is looking to replicate. Samsung Pay in the UK has a few key differences between the same service in other territories and Android Pay. For one, it has a deal with TfL that means a credit or debit card can be designated the “travel” card, if you have multiple cards stored, not requiring the phone screen to be on or a particular card to be selected each time Samsung Pay is used for London travel. For Android Pay, the screen just needs to be on, but for Apple Pay on an iPhone the payment must always be authenticated, which can cause queues at the TfL gates. Other purchases through Samsung Pay have to be authenticated before being made with a fingerprint, iris scan or pin, while Samsung Pay in the UK is only based on the contactless payment system and cannot use the magnetic stripe as it can in the US and other places. The availability of Samsung Pay, plus the expected marketing drive by the South Korean firm, could help the adoption of mobile payments, despite it being limited to Galaxy S8, S7 and S6 variants and only with Visa and Mastercard cards provided by Santander, Nationwide and MBNA at launch. Samsung said HSBC, first direct, M&S bank and AmericanExpress, as well as its A series of smartphones and Gear smartwatches, would be joining Samsung Pay soon. Wood said: “Mobile payments have taken off more slowly than expected, but there are encouraging signs of progress. In its latest earnings call Apple revealed that Apple Pay transactions had grown 450% year on year and it has previously stated that one million users have signed up on a weekly basis. “The arrival of Samsung Pay gives consumers even more choice on how they can make payments. The UK is already a strong market when it comes to contactless payments and the extensive payment infrastructure means that it is a strategic market for any company looking to launch mobile payments” Mobile payments have found more success in metropolitan areas in the UK, with London a hotspot. Wood said: “There have already been many millions of transactions on the TfL network. As consumers become more aware of being able to pay with their smartphones the number of transactions will grow – particularly for low-cost items such as buying a cup of coffee.”


LONDON, May 18, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- The mass introduction of 5G and satellites will lay the foundation for linking the automotive industry up with other industries outside the traditional ecosystem, paving the way for intelligent, cross-segment partnerships. In future cars will see built in, brought in and beamed in / cloud enabled applications of health wellness and well-being in cars. The first step will be the integration of specific devices, such as air condition humidifiers, heart rate sensors in the seal belts, wearables and health apps. On a next level, the vehicle dashboard or augmented reality enabled windshield can be used to display health data such as warnings or statistics on vitals on the passengers until both ecosystems will be perfectly integrated. Along with this trend comes an increased value of data. OEMs and other providers will find new ways to monetise the huge amounts of data they will have access to. At Frost & Sullivans's industry event Intelligent Mobility on the 29th of June at the Jumeirah Carlton in London, Olivia Price-Walker, Principal Consultant, Visionary Innovation Group, Frost & Sullivan, will offer more insights and valuable best practices on the role Healthcare, Wellness and Wellbeing will take in the cars of the future. "By 2030 the world of healthcare will be unrecognisable - today's data giants IBM, Amazon, Google will be our healthcare providers. Our cars, homes and workplaces will be our hospitals. Most of the world will be genome sequenced and precision medicine will be revolutionising accurate healthcare treatment. Healthcare will be democratised, data based, automated and driven by consumers themselves. As new players flood this market is it time for the mobility industry to make their move." To download the Intelligent Mobility brochure and register to attend the event, please visit www.frost.com/intmob. "Today, you might not find your car and your health have much in common but in future both will share key characteristics – they will be highly digitalised, personalised and individualised – so why not combine them?," finds Olivia Price-Walker. "This can be interpreted as an extension of OEMs long-existing focus on the passengers' safety. Providing the vehicle owner with convenient and easy to manage built-in, brought-in and cloud-enabled applications will be crucial." During its upcoming annual industry event "Intelligent Mobility," taking place on 29th of June at the Jumeirah Carlton Hotel in London, Frost & Sullivan will offer visionary insights into the future of mobility from leading OEMs and tier-one suppliers, prominent industry thinkers, policymakers and disruptors from companies like Jaguar Land Rover, Facebook, Renault–Nissan Alliance, the Financial Times, Mahindra & Mahindra, Transport for London, the Centre for Connected and Autonomous Vehicles, and many more. Besides focusing on Healthcare and Wellbeing, Intelligent Mobility will bring together industry experts on the Future of Mobility Trends, Freight Delivery and Connected and Autonomous Vehicles. Moreover, the event will shed light on carefully selected auto tech startups and their particular business models to showcase the extent of disruption the industry faces. The conference will be complemented by a debate at the House of Lords and the Frost & Sullivan Intelligent Mobility Awards Banquet, a black tie evening and gala dinner. A limited number of complimentary passes are available to members of the media. For more information on Frost & Sullivan's Intelligent Mobility event, please e-mail Jana Schoeneborn, Corporate Communications, at jana.schoeneborn@frost.com. View Frost & Sullivan's video on new mobility business models and the future of Intelligent Mobility here: https://goo.gl/eacFZL Frost & Sullivan, the Growth Partnership Company, works in collaboration with clients to leverage visionary innovation that addresses the global challenges and related growth opportunities that will make or break today's market participants. For more than 50 years, we have been developing growth strategies for the global 1000, emerging businesses, the public sector and the investment community. Contact us: Start the discussion


News Article | May 23, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

Fastned is building a European network of fast charging stations and currently has 63 stations operational. Volume (kWhs) and revenues have grown at a pace of circa 10% month-on-month for two years now; significantly faster than the market. The experience gained in the Netherlands provides a good basis for European expansion. Last month Fastned announced that it has acquired the first 14 locations in Germany. Fastned also signed an agreement with Transport for London (TfL) for the realisation of fast-charging stations in The Greater London Area. In March, the charging company saw its first stations (operational) break-even. Michiel Langezaal, CEO Fastned: "Not a day passes by without news about the transition from fossil fueled cars to electric cars. Just last week, Volvo announced that they will stop development of new diesel engines, and Shell announced that they plan to start investments in charging infrastructure for electric cars. It is becoming more and more clear that the future is electric." Investors can subscribe to the issue from today until 6 June 2017 via the Fastned website: http://www.fastnedcharging.com/bonds. On this page investors can also find the prospectus and other relevant information. The issue is limited to 3,300 bonds for a total of 3.3 million euro. Note for the editor (not for publication): For more information go to http://www.fastnedcharging.com. Or check out our pressroom, in the press kit you will find logo's, pictures and graphics. Fastned is building a European network of fast-charging stations where all electric cars can charge. We are building stations at high traffic locations along the highway and in cities, where electric cars can charge in 20 minutes. This will provide freedom for electric cars to drive everywhere throughout Europe. As of today, Fastned has 63 stations operational in The Netherlands and is working on expanding its fast charging network to the rest of Europe. Fastned is listed on the Nxchange stock exchange. Fastned is rolling out its network of fast charging stations in response to the rapidly increasing numbers of EV's in Europe. Car manufacturers such as Tesla, Audi, Volvo, Aston Martin, BMW, Nissan, Mitsubishi, Porsche, Volkswagen, Mercedes, Ford, General Motors, Renault and other car manufacturers are investing billions of Euro's in the development of, and production capacity for EV's. More and more EV's are hitting our roads which drives the need for charging infrastructure. Fastned is responding to this development by building the service stations of the future. Co-founder and CEO Michiel Langezaal: "We are the Shell of the future, only our energy comes from the sun and the wind. For more information go to http://www.fastned.nl/en.


News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: www.theguardian.com

Uber has come under further pressure in London after a union threatened legal action if the capital’s transport authority renews the taxi app’s licence without guaranteeing more rights for drivers. In a legal letter sent this week, the GMB union warns Transport for London (TfL) that failure to impose conditions which guarantee income for Uber drivers while limiting their number in the city and the hours they can work would “breach the relevant standards of reasonableness and would accordingly be unlawful”. The GMB said it would apply for permission to seek a judicial review of the licence agreement if TfL did not apply the new conditions. The union argues that Uber’s current business model in London necessitates drivers working excessive hours “to the detriment of the health and safety of Uber drivers in London and of other road users”. The dispute over the terms of Uber’s licence is due to be settled via arbitration, and the GMB said if this route was chosen the company’s licence should be renewed for only a six-month period in order to allow the matter to be resolved. The term of Uber’s current licence is five years and the new one is expected to be of a similar length. The threat of legal action from the GMB comes after Uber drivers and the Licensed Taxi Drivers’ Association, the trade body for London’s black-cab drivers, called for minimum employment rights and better regulation of private hire taxi operators including the US company. The GMB backed a successful employment tribunal case last year against Uber that ruled its drivers were not self-employed contractors but workers, and were therefore entitled to the national minimum wage and holiday pay. Uber has appealed against the ruling. The original case involved 19 Uber drivers. The GMB said a further 41 drivers have joined the claim. GMB has also lobbied the mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, who has close ties to the union, to step in. An Uber spokesperson said: “Millions of Londoners rely on Uber to get a reliable ride at the touch of a button and thousands of licensed drivers make money through our app. “Almost all taxi and private hire drivers in the UK have been self-employed for decades and with Uber they have more control over what they do. Drivers who use Uber are totally free to choose if, when and where they drive with no shifts, minimum hours or uniforms. Last year drivers using our app made average fares of £15 per hour and were logged in for an average of 30 hours per week. “The vast majority of drivers who use Uber tell us they want to remain their own boss as that’s the main reason why they signed up to us in the first place.” Despite the protests, TfL is expected to renew Uber’s licence. A TfL spokesperson said: “We do not comment on the status of individual licence applications.” Under proposed new rules, the amount that Uber and other private hire operators pay for a licence could rise dramatically. Over the next five years, Uber’s bill could rise from about £3,000 at present to more than £2m, under a new scheme that would charge higher fees to operators with more cars. However, consultation on the new fees does not close until June and any new rules may not come into force for some time.


To download the Intelligent Mobility brochure and register to attend the event, please visit www.frost.com/intmob. "Today, you might not find your car and your health have much in common but in future both will share key characteristics – they will be highly digitalised, personalised and individualised – so why not combine them?," finds Olivia Price-Walker. "This can be interpreted as an extension of OEMs long-existing focus on the passengers' safety. Providing the vehicle owner with convenient and easy to manage built-in, brought-in and cloud-enabled applications will be crucial." During its upcoming annual industry event "Intelligent Mobility," taking place on 29th of June at the Jumeirah Carlton Hotel in London, Frost & Sullivan will offer visionary insights into the future of mobility from leading OEMs and tier-one suppliers, prominent industry thinkers, policymakers and disruptors from companies like Jaguar Land Rover, Facebook, Renault–Nissan Alliance, the Financial Times, Mahindra & Mahindra, Transport for London, the Centre for Connected and Autonomous Vehicles, and many more. Besides focusing on Healthcare and Wellbeing, Intelligent Mobility will bring together industry experts on the Future of Mobility Trends, Freight Delivery and Connected and Autonomous Vehicles. Moreover, the event will shed light on carefully selected auto tech startups and their particular business models to showcase the extent of disruption the industry faces. The conference will be complemented by a debate at the House of Lords and the Frost & Sullivan Intelligent Mobility Awards Banquet, a black tie evening and gala dinner. A limited number of complimentary passes are available to members of the media. For more information on Frost & Sullivan's Intelligent Mobility event, please e-mail Jana Schoeneborn, Corporate Communications, at jana.schoeneborn@frost.com. View Frost & Sullivan's video on new mobility business models and the future of Intelligent Mobility here: https://goo.gl/eacFZL Frost & Sullivan, the Growth Partnership Company, works in collaboration with clients to leverage visionary innovation that addresses the global challenges and related growth opportunities that will make or break today's market participants. For more than 50 years, we have been developing growth strategies for the global 1000, emerging businesses, the public sector and the investment community. Contact us: Start the discussion To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/integration-of-digital-health-in-the-car-unleashes-growth-potential-for-strategic-partnerships-300459909.html


News Article | May 26, 2017
Site: www.theguardian.com

Uber’s licence to operate in London has been renewed but only for a period of four months, as transport authorities continue to deliberate whether to grant it a five-year licence. The decision over renewal has become the latest focus of controversy around the app-based taxi firm, with black-cab drivers and unions demanding that Transport for London reject the application without assurances over Uber’s operation and working practices. The GMB union and the Licensed Taxi Drivers’ Association have threatened legal challenges to TfL granting Uber a new licence. The LTDA has argued that Uber is not a fit and proper operator and is jeopardising public safety, while the GMB has demanded TfL impose conditions to secure the health and safety of drivers, passengers and other road users. Two drivers won a GMB-backed case against Uber in an employment tribunal last year, which ruled that its drivers were not self-employed contractors but workers with holiday and pay entitlements. Uber is challenging the ruling. Uber was originally licensed in London in 2012 and its five-year private hire licence is scheduled to expire on 30 May. A TfL spokesperson said: “Uber London Limited has been granted a four-month private hire operator licence. This will allow us to conclude our consideration of a five-year licence.” However, black-cab drivers condemned the move as a “coward’s decision”. Steve McNamara, general secretary of the LTDA, said: “Uber has still not answered questions that TfL asked months ago. We say they are either safe to licence or they’re not. You can’t be a little bit pregnant. “We think that TfL’s reason for this temporary licence is unlawful. This is totally unprecedented.” TfL said it would not comment on individual licence applications. McNamara said the LTDA was taking legal advice and could launch court action in the next week: “We will be challenging this coward’s decision.” Another factor in TfL’s deliberations is its consultation into private hire vehicles. The proposals could see the licence fees for Uber and other large private hire operators rise dramatically, from about £3,000 over a five-year period to more than £2m. The consultation closes in June. Last month TfL wrote to all operators saying it was “considering, on a case-by-case basis, whether private hire operator licences of a shorter duration should be issued, until the outcome of the consultation process is known and any changes are implemented”. An Uber spokesperson said: “Millions of Londoners rely on Uber to get a reliable ride at the touch of a button and thousands of licensed drivers make money through our app. We look forward to continuing to help keep London moving.”


News Article | May 29, 2017
Site: www.theguardian.com

A year ago, the progress of Crossrail 2 seemed assured. A political consensus was forming that a second mass-transit line across London should be built from north to south, its urgency underpinned by the verdict of the National Infrastructure Commission (NIC) that this was the most important single project for Britain and work needed to start now. The then chancellor George Osborne duly doled out £80m to get the ball rolling, expecting a hybrid bill in the same parliament. Now, with its champions having gone after the EU referendum, the project’s prospects look bleak. While City firms discuss relocating offices and staff, any assumption that higher business rates and commuter revenues would pay the £32bn construction bill is on shakier ground. The omission of Crossrail 2 from the Conservative manifesto, in which other infrastructure projects were listed, was the clearest sign yet that there is little appetite in a Theresa May government for another London-based scheme. Although official reaction appears muted, constrained by the purdah rules of the pre-election period, insiders at Transport for London (TfL) fear that a cherished – and for them, critical – scheme is on the rocks. The arguments for the north-south line, which would be tunnelled from New Southgate and Tottenham Hale to Wimbledon and link up with commuter rail services in Hertfordshire and Surrey, boil down to capacity. The arteries of the growing capital can only be temporarily unclogged through improving present lines. On the underground, the Victoria line has been upgraded and the Northern line is following, while an upgraded Thameslink service will also move extra passengers more swiftly through the centre of the capital. With such upgrades and the imminent completion of the original Crossrail as the east-west Elizabeth line, some may think Londoners should shut up and be grateful. But the case for a new, faster service on this alignment was first made when the city was in relative decline: the Chelsea-Hackney line’s underground route has been safeguarded for decades. And now, with London’s population forecast to rise to 10 million by 2030, the picture is further complicated by the building of HS2, the high-speed rail network linking London to Birmingham and the north. The previous London transport commissioner Peter Hendy warned for years of the mayhem to be expected at Euston when thousands of HS2 passengers pour into an already overcrowded rail terminus. More recently, London’s mayor, Sadiq Khan, said the city would “grind to a halt” without Crossrail 2. The scheme is seen by transport planners as vital to relieve the pressure on South West Trains, with its Waterloo terminus already the busiest station in the country. Some renewed political impetus is expected after the election, when the NIC chairman, Andrew Adonis, a prominent champion of the scheme, is expected to return to public life and push its claims. But since Lord Adonis’s commission pinned its colours to the mast, the Brexit vote has reinforced political wariness of looking London-centric. David Leam, the infrastructure director at business group London First, said: “The key thing this project needs is a comparable one to start in the north. Crossrail 2 has a great case, but what the government also wants to do is to be seen to be investing in projects in the rest of the country.” That equivalence is underlined by Labour’s commitment to building a “Crossrail of the north”. But even the nomenclature in the various manifestos is telling, Leam said: “It’s indicative of how ill-formed those ideas are that the [northern] scheme doesn’t really have a name: the Lib Dems talked about HS3 and the Tories talk about northern powerhouse rail.” The politics are sticky. TfL has submitted a business plan for a scheme that had the full backing of the previous London mayor and transport secretary. But the antipathy between Khan and Chris Grayling has already emerged, with the latter rebuffing TfL’s business case for taking over inner London rail services on Southeastern, and at least part of the hold-up on Crossrail 2 appears to be TfL’s plan lingering in Grayling’s intray. A government response was expected in early spring, but now autumn appears to be the earliest time for an announcement. Publication of the response may ease worries in Chelsea, west London, where many residents have opposed the building of a Kings Road station. With TfL looking to rein in costs to persuade the government, the station is strongly tipped to be excluded from the next iteration of the scheme. Funding is also a stumbling block, because the capital will again be expected to meet at least half the costs, although business rates will remain elevated for years just to pay for the first Crossrail. Proponents of Crossrail 2 argue that revenue is guaranteed: this is a scheme to cope with demand, not one to stimulate economic growth, although it would also expect to fuel development, growth and housing further out on regional branches south and north. “It’s not a build it and hope they come project. It’s as close to a sure thing as you can get in infrastructure,” Leam said. The original Crossrail is scheduled to come into full operation within two years: its tunnels are built and the first trains will soon enter service on eastern and above-ground routes. Crossrail’s protracted genesis shows the £14.8bn project was far from inevitable: first outlined in the 1970s, it was backed in the 1990s by the government, before being scrapped, and was put under review by the Conservative-Liberal Democrat coalition as late as 2010, when construction had started. Leam said: “We’re stuck at a red light, not shunted into the sidings. But we could be stuck there for five or 10 years. The risk is that we repeat the Crossrail experience of endless prevarication, while congestion gets worse and the cost goes up.”


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Collaborative Research & Development | Award Amount: 2.18M | Year: 2012

GyroDrive is a game changing hybrid concept for City bus and HGV applications. Despite significant pressure to reduce emissions and improve fuel consumption, the commercial uptake of hybrid buses has been low due the high system cost. Additionally, with a life of up to 20 years, there will be a significant number of diesel buses in service for the forseeable future. The GyrdoDrive consortium will build and prove a novel hybrid system, incorporating an electrically driven flywheel. The system will be less than half the weight of a current hybrid system, and will be small enough to retro fit to an existing bus with no loss of interior space. The system will be developed by Williams Hybrid Power, GKN, and GKN-Evo, with Go Ahead group performing a fleet trial on a number of different bus types to validate the system performance. The consortium expect fuel savings of up to 25%, and expect the system price in production to have a payback period of less than 5 years

Loading Transport for London collaborators
Loading Transport for London collaborators