Translational Imaging Research Center

Taipei, Taiwan

Translational Imaging Research Center

Taipei, Taiwan
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Kao Y.-C.J.,University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill | Kao Y.-C.J.,Biomedical Imaging Center | Kao Y.-C.J.,Taipei Medical University | Oyarzabal E.A.,University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill | And 10 more authors.
Stroke | Year: 2017

Background and Purpose - No studies have determined the effect of differences in pial collateral extent (number and diameter), independent of differences in environmental factors and unknown genetic factors, on severity of stroke. We examined ischemic tissue evolution during acute stroke, as measured by magnetic resonance imaging and histology, by comparing 2 congenic mouse strains with otherwise identical genetic backgrounds but with different alleles of the Determinant of collateral extent-1 (Dce1) genetic locus. We also optimized magnetic resonance perfusion and diffusion-deficit thresholds by using histological measures of ischemic tissue. Methods - Perfusion, diffusion, and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging were performed on collateral-poor (congenic-Bc) and collateral-rich (congenic-B6) mice at 1, 5, and 24 hours after permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion. Magnetic resonance imaging-derived penumbra and ischemic core volumes were confirmed by histology in a subset of mice at 5 and 24 hours after permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion. Results - Although perfusion-deficit volumes were similar between strains 1 hour after permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion, diffusion-deficit volumes were 32% smaller in collateral-rich mice. At 5 hours, collateral-rich mice had markedly restored perfusion patterns showing reduced perfusion-deficit volumes, smaller infarct volumes, and smaller perfusion-diffusion mismatch volumes compared with the collateral-poor mice (P<0.05). At 24 hours, collateral-rich mice had 45% smaller T2-weighted lesion volumes (P<0.005) than collateral-poor mice, with no difference in perfusion-diffusion mismatch volumes because of penumbral death occurring 5 to 24 hours after permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion in collateral-poor mice. Conclusions - Variation in collateral extent significantly alters infarct volume expansion, transiently affects perfusion and diffusion magnetic resonance imaging signatures, and impacts salvage of ischemic penumbra after stroke onset. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.


Liu H..-S.,U.S. National Institute on Drug Abuse | Liu H..-S.,Taipei Medical University | Liu H..-S.,Taipei Medical University Hospital | Liu H..-S.,Translational Imaging Research Center | And 6 more authors.
NMR in Biomedicine | Year: 2016

Recent studies have shown that post-treatment with cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) has neuroregenerative effects in animal models of stroke. The purpose of this study was to characterize CART-mediated neuronal and vascular repairments using non-invasive MRI techniques. Adult male rats were subjected to a 90 min middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). Animals were separated into two groups with similar infarction sizes, measured by T2-weighted MRI on Day 2 after MCAo, and were treated with CART or vehicle intranasally from Day 3 to Day 12. Diffusion tensor imaging was used to examine changes in plasticity of white matter elements. Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) was used to measure angiogenesis. Post-treatment with CART significantly increased fractional anisotropy (FA) in lesioned cortex on Days 10 and 25 post stroke. A significant correlation between the behavioral recovery in body asymmetry and the change in FA was shown, suggesting that behavioral recovery was associated with reinnervation to the lesioned hemisphere. CART also increased the intensity of SWI and the immunoreactivity of the vascular marker alpha-smooth muscle actin in lesioned cortex. Together, our data support a non-invasive treatment strategy for stroke through angiogenesis and reinnervation by CART. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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