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News Article | April 26, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

AURORA, Colo. (April 26, 2017) - Using a unique microscope capable of illuminating living cell structures in great detail, researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have found clues into how a destructive autoimmune disease works, setting the stage for more discoveries in the future. The scientists were trying to visualize antibodies that cause neuromyelitis optica (NMO), a rare autoimmune disorder that results in paralysis and blindness. Using a custom STED (Stimulated Emission Depletion) microscope built at CU Anschutz, they were able to actually see clusters of antibodies atop astrocytes, the brain cell target of the autoimmune response in NMO. "We discovered that we could see the natural clustering of antibodies on the surface of target cells. This could potentially correspond with their ability to damage the cells," said Professor Jeffrey Bennett, MD, PhD, senior author of the study and associate director of Translational Research at the Center for NeuroScience at CU Anschutz. "We know that once antibody binds to the surface of the astrocyte, we are witnessing the first steps in the disease process." When that domino effect begins, it's hard to stop. But Bennett said the ability to see the antibodies on the brain cells offers a chance to develop targeted therapies that do not suppress the body's immune system like current treatments for the disease do. "By applying this novel approach we can see firsthand how these antibodies work," said the study's lead author, John Soltys, a current student in the Medical Scientist Training Program at CU Anschutz. "We are looking at the initiation of autoimmune injury in this disease." The breakthrough was made possible with the STED microscope, a complex instrument that uses lasers to achieve extreme precision and clarity. It was built by physicist Stephanie Meyer, PhD, at CU Anschutz. This is the first time it has been used in a research project here. "This would have been impossible to see with any kind of normal microscope," said study co-author Professor Diego Restrepo, PhD, director of the Center for NeuroScience. "We are inviting other scientists with research projects on campus to use the STED microscope." According to Meyer, lower resolution microscopes are blurrier than the STED due to diffraction of light. But the STED's lasers illuminate a smaller area to acquire a higher resolution image. Unlike electron microscopes, STED users can see entire living cells at extremely high resolution, as they did in this study. Restrepo said there are only a handful of STEDs in the nation and just one in Colorado. The researchers said the discovery is the result of a unique partnership between clinical neurology, immunology and neuroscience coming together to solve a fundamental question of how antibodies can initiate targeted injury in an autoimmune disease. "These are the building blocks that we can use to carry our research to the next level," Bennett said. The study was published this week in Biophysical Journal.


News Article | April 26, 2017
Site: www.rdmag.com

A new type of microscope, capable of illuminating living cell structures in clear detail, could provide insight into autoimmune diseases and lead to new treatment options. Researchers from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus believe this new tool— a custom Stimulated Emission Depletion (STED) microscope—could set the stage for future treatment discoveries and visualize antibodies that cause the rare autoimmune disorder neuromyelitis optica, which can result in paralysis and blindness. The researchers used the microscope to actually see the clusters of antibodies atop astrocytes—the brain cell target of the autoimmune response in the disease. “By applying this novel approach we can see firsthand how these antibodies work,” the study's lead author, John Soltys, a current student in the Medical Scientist Training Program at CU Anschutz, said in a statement. “We are looking at the initiation of autoimmune injury in this disease.” Dr. Jeffrey Bennett, Ph.D., the senior author of the study and the associate director of Translational Research at the Center for NeuroScience at CU Anschutz, explained that the microscope allows researchers to view the early stages of various diseases as they form. “We discovered that we could see the natural clustering of antibodies on the surface of target cells,” Bennett said in a statement. “This could potentially correspond with their ability to damage the cells. “We know that once antibody binds to the surface of the astrocyte, we are witnessing the first steps in the disease process,” he added. According to Bennett, the ability to see the antibodies on the brain cells offers researchers an opportunity to develop targeted therapies that do not suppress the body’s immune system like some current treatments for the disease do. The STED microscope—which was built by CU Anschutz physicist Stephanie Meyer, Ph.D.—uses lasers to achieve a higher level of precision and clarity. Lower resolution microscopes are blurry because of the diffraction of light. However, the lasers illuminate a smaller area to acquire a higher resolution image than traditional microscopes. The STED microscope can also highlight entire living cells at extremely high resolution, unlike electron microscopes. “This would have been impossible to see with any kind of normal microscope,” professor Diego Restrepo, Ph.D., director of the Center for NeuroScience and study co-author, said in a statement. “We are inviting other scientists with research projects on campus to use the STED microscope.” The study was published in Biophysical Journal.


The MIT Center for Environmental Health Sciences (CEHS), an interdisciplinary research center, funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), invites MIT junior faculty and research staff with principal investigator privileges to submit applications for funding of pilot projects related to environmental health, to support either basic or translational research. Please see the NIEHS strategic plan to gain understanding of the types of projects center plans to fund. Preference is given to projects that address the NIEHS Strategic Goals. The center anticipates funding of $25,000 (direct costs) for each project. The center encourages junior faculty to apply, especially those who are involved in interdisciplinary environmental health collaborations, for example between engineers and scientists. Projects can be anywhere on the spectrum between basic sciences and clinical translation. In all cases, the trajectory to human application must be clear and feasible. Translational Pilot Projects will be evaluated separately from those in the basic sciences. These projects are funded through the generosity of Vilma and Lionel Kinney, and are named in honor of Theron G. Randolph, a pioneer in the fields of environmental and natural products medicine. Applicants should submit a four-page research plan that outlines the specific aims and research strategy (i.e. significant, innovation, and approach). In the project title, please add a parenthesis indicating (Basic Research) or (Translational Research). Applications should also include a detailed budget form (Form Page 4), budget justification, and a biographical sketch using the NIH PHS398 forms. Please note that travel for scientific conferences/meetings are not allowed with these funds. Questions regarding the application process or proposal ideas should be directed to Professor Bevin P. Engelward, deputy director. Deadline for this call is May 31 with an anticipated start date of July 1. Completed applications should be submitted via email to: Amanda Tat, administrative officer of the CEHS.


News Article | April 27, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Boston, MA-- A new study led by researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital has found that a single measurement of plasma glycated CD59 (GCD59), a novel biomarker for diabetes, at weeks 24-28 of gestation identified, with high sensitivity and specificity, women who failed the glucose challenge test as well as women with gestational diabetes. Plasma levels of GCD59 were also associated with the probability of delivering a large-for-gestational-age newborn. These findings are published in Diabetes Care. Gestational diabetes is a type of diabetes that occurs during a woman's pregnancy, increasing the mother's risk of delivering a large-for-gestational-age baby, which can lead to pre-term birth, fetal injury, perinatal mortality and cesarean delivery. Gestational diabetes is also a risk factor for preeclampsia and gestational hypertension. Since treatment of gestational diabetes can lessen the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes, practice guidelines recommend screening all non-diabetic, pregnant women for the disease. The current standard of care to both screen and diagnose gestational diabetes predominantly involves a two-step approach. The first step, known as the glucose challenge test, includes administration of a sugary drink followed by a blood sugar measurement one hour later. Women who fail this screening are then sent for a longer test, called the oral glucose tolerance test, which requires fasting overnight, drinking a more concentrated sugar solution and undergoing baseline and hourly blood draws for three hours. These glucose tests, or variations thereof, are currently the only methods used to screen pregnant women for or diagnose gestational diabetes. They are time consuming, cumbersome, uncomfortable for mothers and have poor reported reproducibility. The research team's primary goal was to assess the accuracy of the diabetes biomarker, GCD59, in predicting the results of the standard of care glucose challenge test used to screen for gestational diabetes. The team conducted a case-control study of 1,000 pregnant women who were receiving standard prenatal care at BWH: 500 women who had a normal glucose challenge test (control subjects) and 500 women who failed the glucose challenge test and required a subsequent oral glucose tolerance test (case patients). Researchers found that, when compared with the control subjects, the median plasma GCD59 value was 8.5-fold higher in the patients who failed the glucose challenge test and 10-fold higher in the subset of these patients who met diagnostic criteria for gestational diabetes in the subsequent oral glucose tolerance test. "This is the first study to demonstrate that a single measurement of plasma GCD59 can be used as a simplified method to identify women who are at risk for failing the glucose challenge test and are at higher risk for developing gestational diabetes," says Jose Halperin, MD, a physician and researcher, Director of the Hematology Laboratory for Translational Research at BWH and senior author of the publication. The researchers also found that higher plasma GCD59 levels at gestational week 24-28 were associated with higher prevalence of large-for-gestational-age newborns, with the higher the level, the higher the risk (4 percent higher risk for patients in the lowest quartile of GCD59 plasma levels, and 14 percent in the highest quartile). Out of the 58 large-for-gestational-age babies born to mothers that failed the glucose challenge test in this study, 80 percent were born to mothers who did not meet oral glucose tolerance test criteria for gestational diabetes, but had median plasma GCD59 levels 7-fold higher than control women with a normal glucose challenge test. These findings are consistent with other studies showing that women who fail the glucose challenge test, but do not meet criteria for gestational diabetes, are still at a higher risk of abnormal pregnancy outcomes, including delivering large for gestational age babies. Currently there are no practice guidelines for the management of women who fall between normal and abnormal glucose tolerance levels, and, therefore, their management is the same as that for women with a normal glucose challenge test results. "These results suggest that a single measurement of plasma GCD59 during weeks 24-28 may also help stratify the risk for delivering larger infants among women with gestational glucose intolerance." says Halperin. "Our studies opened an avenue for larger multicenter studies to further assess the clinical utility of plasma GCD59 for screening and diagnosis of gestational diabetes among the general population of the United States. If our results are confirmed, we're hopeful that the GCD59 test could be available in clinical practices within the next few years." Jose Halperin and Michael Chorev have a financial interest in Mellitus, LLC, which is developing diagnostic tools for diabetes, including the test described in this research under a license agreement from Harvard University. This project was supported by the National Institutes of Health grants DK-095429, DK-62994, DK-089206, DK-101442, DK-107407, and HL-111771. It was also funded by the Harvard University Accelerator Fund, now known as the Blavatnik Biomedical Accelerator at Harvard University and the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. Paper cited: Halperin et al. "Plasma Glycated CD59, a Novel Biomarker for Detection of Pregnancy-Induced Glucose Intolerance." Diabetes Care DOI: 10.2337/dc16-2598. Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) is a 793-bed nonprofit teaching affiliate of Harvard Medical School and a founding member of Partners HealthCare. BWH has more than 4.2 million annual patient visits and nearly 46,000 inpatient stays, is the largest birthing center in Massachusetts and employs nearly 16,000 people. The Brigham's medical preeminence dates back to 1832, and today that rich history in clinical care is coupled with its national leadership in patient care, quality improvement and patient safety initiatives, and its dedication to research, innovation, community engagement and educating and training the next generation of health care professionals. Through investigation and discovery conducted at its Brigham Research Institute (BRI), BWH is an international leader in basic, clinical and translational research on human diseases, more than 3,000 researchers, including physician-investigators and renowned biomedical scientists and faculty supported by nearly $666 million in funding. For the last 25 years, BWH ranked second in research funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) among independent hospitals. BWH is also home to major landmark epidemiologic population studies, including the Nurses' and Physicians' Health Studies and the Women's Health Initiative as well as the TIMI Study Group, one of the premier cardiovascular clinical trials groups. For more information, resources and to follow us on social media, please visit BWH's online newsroom.


NEW YORK--(BUSINESS WIRE)--United Neuroscience (UNS), a clinical stage biotechnology company dedicated to developing best-in-class therapies for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and other neurodegenerative disorders, today announced positive Phase 1 data for UB-311, its novel synthetic peptide vaccine targeting beta amyloid (Aβ) in the treatment of AD. The Phase 1 data, which was published in the Alzheimer’s & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions journal from the Alzheimer’s Association, showed that UB-311 was safe and well-tolerated with a 100 percent response rate and high anti-Aβ antibody titers across patients. The insidious, decades-long buildup of misfolded Aβ oligomers, fibrils and amyloid plaques is believed to play a pivotal role in brain cell injury leading to dementia and is a major focus for drug development efforts. Several late stage clinical trials are currently testing passive immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) targeting Aβ with some reporting encouraging results. Active vaccination of human individuals against Aβ has also long been pursued but has yet to be effectively achieved. Most active vaccine efforts have either reported low antibody titers and responder rates or significant safety issues such as T-cell mediated encephalitis. UB-311 is a novel UBITh™ active vaccine targeting the N-terminus of Aβ, designed to induce high B-cell specific responses while avoiding T-cell inflammation. UB-311 was previously shown to generate considerable site-specific antibodies across mice, guinea pigs, macaques and baboons and to also reduce Aβ1–42 oligomers, protofibrils, and plaque load in the transgenic hAPP751 mouse model of AD. “We are leveraging our commercially proven UBITh vaccine platform that has sold over three billion doses and has shown that we can safely break immune tolerance to endogenous proteins,” said Chang Yi Wang, Chief Scientific Officer of UNS. “We are eager to validate our platform to target clinical brain disorders.” In the UB-311 first-in-human trial reported today, 19 patients with mild-to-moderate AD were immunized with three doses of the vaccine at enrollment, four weeks and 12 weeks, and monitored until week 48. No major adverse events were reported in the study, including absence of ARIA-E, a treatment emergent safety issue that has plagued other anti-Aβ mAbs in development. Injection site swelling and agitation were the most common adverse events reported. Immunogenicity results showed that UB-311 vaccination had a 100 percent responder rate and induced strong anti-Aβ antibody titers that preferentially recognized the aggregated forms of Aβ. In a small subgroup of patients with mild AD over 60 years of age, stabilization or improvement in three cognitive scales from baseline to week 48 was observed. “Our positive Phase 1 clinical trial results show that our active vaccination approach against endogenous pathogenic proteins has an acceptable safety and tolerability profile in patients, which was the primary endpoint of the study,” said Ajay Verma, Chief Medical Officer of UNS. “The ability of our platform to break self-tolerance in patients and safely elicit therapeutic autoantibodies, or ‘endobodies’ as we like to refer to them, suggests that we are on the right path and have overcome prior challenges. We believe our ‘endobody vaccine’ approach could provide therapeutic and prophylactic treatment for Alzheimer’s disease as well as many other neurodegenerative diseases.” “In addition to the high response rate and antibody titers, our Phase 1 results may show some preliminary indications of efficacy,” said Mei Mei Hu, Chief Executive Officer of UNS. “We believe there is a potential for this therapy to be effective in a large population of patients, and have designed our Phase 2 trial to target patients in the initial stages of AD where we expect UB-311 to have the greatest effect.” UNS’ ongoing Phase 2 active immunotherapy trial of UB-311 in early-to-mild AD patients is fully enrolled. Results from the Phase 2 trial are expected in mid-2018. United Neuroscience (UNS) is a clinical-stage biotech company dedicated to the development of best-in-class immunotherapeutics for the brain. UNS was founded to address the social and economic burden of Alzheimer’s and other neurodegenerative diseases and seeks to rapidly advance candidates into and through clinical trials with the goal of delivering breakthrough treatments to patients. For more information please visit www.unitedneuroscience.com


This SU2C Convergence effort will bring together biomedical researchers and leading data scientists to focus on DNA mismatch repair and other topics related to the human immune system and immuno-oncology. Datasets containing billions of pieces of information, derived from genetics, imaging, clinical prognoses, medication records, patient experiences, and other sources are currently being created at most major cancer centers. Typically, there are significant barriers to combining datasets from different studies or organizations, and to accessing sophisticated and sometimes novel tools needed for analysis. SU2C Convergence supports computational scientists working with cancer researchers, as well as clinicians, to pool their expertise to make the datasets useful for predicting the course of cancer, the likelihood of relapse, and to cure cancers. "As a new approach, Convergence -- bringing together life sciences, physical sciences and engineering in scientific research -- holds great promise," stated Phillip A. Sharp, PhD, chairman of the SU2C Scientific Advisory Committee and institute professor at the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Sharp co-authored the January 2011 pivotal MIT white paper, "The Third Revolution: The Convergence of the Life Sciences, Physical Sciences, and Engineering" which signaled this new frontier and departure from tradition in biomedicine. "Stand Up To Cancer has taken the lead in accelerating this fundamentally different approach, through which the most innovative cancer research is evolving." Convergence 2.0 projects may explore questions such as, but not limited to: "Through collaboration of investigators across diverse disciplines, convergence grants offer a novel research model that spurs innovation in combating cancer," stated Arnold J. Levine, PhD, professor, Institute for Advance Study and vice chairperson of the SU2C Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC).  "By combining expertise from fields such as information technology, nanotechnology, new material research, imaging, optics, quantum physics, and other physical sciences -- often considered outside the realm of traditional biomedical research -- with traditional clinical and life science expertise, convergence grants may provide critical outcomes to advance the fight against cancer." Dr. Levine, as well as William G. Nelson, MD, PhD, director of oncology at Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, V Foundation Scientific Advisory Committee member, and who also serves as vice chairperson of the SU2C SAC, will jointly oversee this Convergence 2.0 program. Optimally, SU2C Convergence 2.0 projects will include a basic science or translational component and propose a small clinical trial to test ideas or early proof of concept. SU2C strongly recommends that Applicants offer existing data sets of clinical measurements from immunotherapy trials to advance proposed hypotheses and test ideas, and to design and test new algorithms.  Teams with the strongest proposals will be invited to participate in a Fall 2017 Convergence 2.0 Ideas Lab to further develop research concepts and design. SU2C will explore possible collaborations with computer science researchers involving machine learning, and other advanced statistical methods for analysis of large complex data sets. In 2015, SU2C and the National Science Foundation engaged in a first-of-its-kind collaboration, to combine quantitative and clinical approaches to studying cancer and advancing therapies. Four SU2C Convergence Translational Research Teams were funded and their research is currently underway. Each team engages post-doctoral fellows who are paired with investigators. Funding and grants from the National Science Foundation, the V Foundation for Cancer Research (whose funding specifically supports the post-doctoral fellows), as well as the Breast Cancer Research Foundation, The Lustgarten Foundation for Pancreatic Cancer Research, and Bristol-Myers Squibb Company support the following projects: Details on the "Convergence 2.0" program are available via the SU2C web site at: http://progress.su2c.org/convergenceapplications/. The deadline for Letters of Intent for SU2C Convergence 2.0 is June 30, 2017. Selected applicants will be invited to a Fall 2017 "Ideas Lab" to discuss the proposed research concepts. Following these deliberations, small groups of investigators will form teams, or will be commissioned by the SU2C Convergence Joint Scientific Advisory Committee to form teams. The submission of full proposals will be invited from those selected for further consideration reflecting the topics for investigation discussed at the Ideas Lab. About the Stand Up To Cancer Initiative Stand Up To Cancer (SU2C) raises funds to accelerate the pace of research to get new therapies to patients quickly and save lives now. SU2C, a program of the Entertainment Industry Foundation (EIF), a 501(c)(3) charitable organization, was established in 2008 by film and media leaders who utilize the industry's resources to engage the public in supporting a new, collaborative model of cancer research, and to increase awareness about cancer prevention as well as progress being made in the fight against the disease. As SU2C's scientific partner, the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) and a Scientific Advisory Committee led by Nobel Laureate Phillip A. Sharp, PhD, conduct rigorous, competitive review processes to identify the best research proposals to recommend for funding, oversee grants administration, and provide expert review of research progress. Current members of the SU2C Council of Founders and Advisors (CFA) include Katie Couric, Sherry Lansing, Lisa Paulsen, Rusty Robertson, Sue Schwartz, Pamela Oas Williams, Ellen Ziffren, and Kathleen Lobb. The late Laura Ziskin and the late Noreen Fraser are also co-founders. Sung Poblete, PhD, RN, has served as SU2C's president and CEO since 2011. For more information on Stand Up To Cancer, visit www.StandUpToCancer.org. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/stand-up-to-cancer-issues-call-for-ideas-for-10-million-convergence-20-teams-to-address-key-questions-about-the-immune-systems-role-in-cancer-development-and-treatment-300464326.html


News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

CAMBRIDGE, MA--(Marketwired - May 24, 2017) -  Ovation Life Sciences, LLC (Ovation) announced today the receipt of 1.5 million dollars in funding from StageDotO, and existing investors, including Longfellow Ventures. The company will use the funds to continue the development of its next-generation scientific data-layer-as-a-service platforms, built to accelerate the progress of life science by improving how the story of scientific data is told. Ovation also announced a partnership with iGeneTRAiN to use Ovation Research to maximize collaboration capabilities across iGeneTRAiN's transplant consortium. The announcement was made today at the 2017 BioIT World Conference and Expo, www.bio-itworldexpo.com. "We are excited for the StageDotO funding in addition to having access to their team of veteran entrepreneurs. Both will be essential as we build relationships with transformative organizations like iGeneTRAiN," said Barry Wark, Chief Executive Officer, Ovation. The International Genetics & Translational Research in Transplantation Network (iGeneTRAiN) is a multi-institutional team of transplant surgeons and scientists co-led by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, who have come together to investigate the genetic factors behind transplant successes and failures. iGeneTRAiN will use Ovation Research Pro to facilitatie the integration of genomic and other omic datasets in over 48,000 samples from more than 30 studies, across 12 countries. "The premise behind iGeneTRAiN is that better sharing and understanding of the global data on transplants and their genetic factors will improve outcomes. Our collaboration with Ovation will significantly improve and accelerate that process," said Brendan J. Keating, DPhil, an Assistant Professor in the Division of Transplantation, Dept. of Surgery in the University of Pennsylvania in and co-founder of iGeneTRAiN. About Ovation Service Lab and Ovation Research Ovation Service Lab and Ovation Research are Ovation's two flagship products. Ovation Research helps teams of collaborators across the globe contribute to a single experiment or group of experiments, providing context and connectivity to the data produced. Ovation Research provides trackable collaboration with version control and an easy way to organize files, activities and conversations across teams. Ovation Service Lab helps diagnostics labs track samples, workflows and processes, while also managing all relationships connected to the data. Both platforms are backed by strict security, assuring that data is always backed up, easily accessible, and encrypted while in transit and at rest. About Ovation Ovation is a scientific data company providing cloud-based data management, collaboration and laboratory coordination services. Serving the data continuum from foundational research to clinical diagnostics, Ovation's platform provides a central location to visualize and explore the relationships between samples, data, analyses, and conclusions for the entire bench to bedside lifecycle. Using provenance tools, siloed information is transformed into a collaborative story that teams share and grow to mobilize the untapped potential of data. Ovation is more scalable, comprehensive and secure than entry-level cloud storage, and more targeted, streamlined and affordable than traditional LIMS systems. More information at www.ovation.io.


News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

(Boston) -- Avrum Spira, MD, MSc, professor of medicine, pathology and bioinformatics at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM), is the inaugural recipient of the Research Innovation and Translation Achievement Award from the American Thoracic Society (ATS). Spira, who also directs the BU-BMC (Boston Medical Center) Cancer Center, was recognized for the translational impact his work has had on early detection of lung cancer as well as his development of new drugs for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). After completing his pulmonary and critical care medicine fellowship and receiving a master's degree in bioinformatics at BU, Spira characterized the first human airway transcriptome (a collection of all the gene activity in a cell) to determine the reversible and permanent genomic changes that occur in the airway with smoking. Following the hypothesis that smoking creates a molecular 'field of injury' throughout the airway of patients with lung cancer and COPD, he used bronchoscopic brushings of the large airways to identify an RNA biomarker that can detect the presence of lung cancer deep within the lung, in a test now used clinically called Percepta®. Hypothesizing that the field of injury extends to the entire upper respiratory tract, his lab has recently developed a gene expression signature in nasal brushings that may serve as a noninvasive biomarker for diagnosing lung cancer in lesions found on chest imaging. "Avrum Spira is a visionary in lung genomics," said David Center, MD, associate provost of Translational Research at BUSM. "He is a gifted computational mathematician, educator and active intensivist who has brought science to the clinic and inspired dozens of trainees. There are few whose discoveries have made a greater direct impact on diagnosis and daily care of patients with lung cancer and COPD in the past 20 years." The ATS was founded in 1905 as the American Sanatorium Association to prevent, control, and treat tuberculosis; renamed the American Trudeau Society in 1938 and the American Thoracic Society in 1960. Originally the medical section of the American Lung Association, the Society became independently incorporated in 2000 as a 501 (c) (3) organization. With a membership of more than 15,000 physicians, research scientists, and nurses and other allied healthcare professionals, their mission is to improve health worldwide by advancing research, clinical care, and public health in respiratory disease, critical illness and sleep disorders. The Research Innovation and Translation Achievement Award recognizes outstanding contributions to the advancement of respiratory research focused on specific innovations to improve health by advancing practice, policy and health care delivery. This includes, but is not limited to drug/device discovery and development, implementation and regulatory science, as well as basic, translational, clinical, public health and health services research. The awardee's contributions demonstrate real-world innovation with tangible benefits to address unmet respiratory healthcare needs. The award also recognizes their accomplishments and role as a leader pursuing team science through collaborative approaches, both interdisciplinary and inter-institutional.


News Article | May 23, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

Molecular HLA typing methods allow more precise matching between donor and recipient and is especially critical to bone marrow or HSCT transplant outcomes. Allogenic HSCT transplantation is a relatively high growth procedure area compared to solid organ transplantation and is a leading area of application for molecular HLA typing. Polymorphism in the human major histocompability complex (MHC) or HLA system is exceedingly complex for serological methods and is best captured by directly assaying genetic sequence. The molecular HLA typing market is provided for various regions, and forecasts are made to 2021. In addition the report discusses trends affecting the molecular transplant matching market.  Successful solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell (HSCT) or bone marrow transplants require histocompatibility between the recipient and donor. Autologous transplantation using hematopoietic cells from the same patient (donor and recipient) is increasingly common and eliminates the need to screen for histocompatibility. However, solid organ transplants and HSCT allografts from another donor requires histocompatibility confirmed by human leukocyte antigen (HLA) testing outside of genetically identical twins. Proteins encoded by HLA system genes function as unique cell surface markers that regulate immune system recognition of foreign cells such as pathogens and tumor cells. Incompatibility between donor and recipient HLA systems or between donor tissue and recipient antibodies can result in severe complications such as transplant rejection. Testing of donor and recipient HLA systems is essential in cases of allograft between unrelated and even siblings. The most common forms of HLA typing are serological testing of HLA antigens and antibodies and detection of HLA alleles using a variety of molecular diagnostic techniques. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is expected to develop into a leading option for the determination of HLA alleles. Key Topics Covered: 1: Executive Summary 2: Transplant Matching And Molecular Technology 3: Molecular Transplant Diagnostics Market And Market Share Analysis 4: Company Profiles - CareDx - Sequencing - Molecular HLA Typing - Illumina - Sequencing - Translational Research - Clinical Assay Development - Industry Lab-Developed Tests - Arrays - Immucor - Transfusion Diagnostics - Transplant Diagnostics - Immucor Dx Laboratory Service - Roche Diagnostics - Molecular Diagnostics - Thermo Fisher Scientific - Transplant Diagnostics - qPCR - Sequencing For more information about this report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/5zxkck/transplant Research and Markets Laura Wood, Senior Manager press@researchandmarkets.com For E.S.T Office Hours Call +1-917-300-0470 For U.S./CAN Toll Free Call +1-800-526-8630 For GMT Office Hours Call +353-1-416-8900 U.S. Fax: 646-607-1907 Fax (outside U.S.): +353-1-481-1716 To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/transplant-matching-molecular-diagnostics-market-2017-2021---research-and-markets-300462450.html


Dr. McIntosh's platform presentation, on Thursday May 11th, at 12 p.m. entitled "HCP Analysis of a Variety of Biologics and Biosimilars using LC-MS/MS", will present Caprion's leading expertise using mass spectrometry workflows for the identification and quantitation of low abundance HCP in biopharmaceutical biological products. In addition, Dr. McIntosh will highlight Innovative approaches to analytical design, bioinformatics and tailored data interpretation with regards to HCP detection and monitoring. Dr. Schirm's presentation entitled "Data Analysis, Quantitation and Reporting for Mass Spectrometry-Based HCP Studies" will be held at the workshop at 4:30 p.m. on Wednesday May 10th and will provide an overview of case studies illustrating how data analysis, quantitation and reporting can be performed for various HCP applications, including characterization of in-process samples and bulk drug substance, comparability studies of biosimilars to innovators, and absolute quantification of HCP. ABOUT BIOLOGICS AND PROCESS-RELATED HCP IMPURITIES    Host-cell proteins (HCP) constitute a major part of process-related impurities during biologics production and represent significant clinical safety risk associated to serious adverse events caused by immunogenicity. According to international guidelines issued by various regulatory agencies, rigorous and consistent methods to identify, measure and monitor residual HCP impurities should be implemented. Detecting low abundance HCP in drug substance (DS) remains a challenge which can be addressed with high sensitivity/high coverage characterization methods such as mass spectrometry, contributing to a robust, well-controlled and reproducible bioprocess. HCP impurities can now be readily identified and tracked with high sensitivity using Caprion's HCP DETECT Technology. Pre-Conference Workshop: Data Analysis, Quantitation and Reporting for Mass Spectrometry-Based HCP Studies  Speaker: Michael Schirm, PhD, Associate Director, R&D Proteomics        Pre-Conference, Wednesday, May 10th, 2017, 4:30 p.m. Platform Presentation: Lesson's Learned: HCP Analysis of a Variety of Biologics and Biosimilars using LC-MS/MS       Speaker: Laura McIntosh, PhD, Vice-President of Translational Research Day 1, Thursday, May 11th, 2017, 12:00 p.m. For more information on the BEBPA conference, visit: http://www.bebpa.org/conferences/ To schedule a meeting with Dr. McIntosh at the event, please email: lmcintosh@caprion.com ABOUT CAPRION BIOSCIENCES, INC.   Founded in 2002, Caprion is a leading specialty CRO laboratory providing an integrated platform in proteomics and immune monitoring services to the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industry. Caprion's immune monitoring division, ImmuneCarta®, offers proprietary multiparametric flow cytometry services for functional analyses of innate and adaptive immune responses. Caprion's proteomics division, ProteoCarta™, offers proprietary gel-free, label-free mass spectrometry (MS) for comprehensive, quantitative and robust comparative measurement of proteins across large sets of biological samples for the discovery and validation of protein biomarkers. Based in Montreal, Canada, and in Gosselies, Belgium, Caprion has been providing large-scale proteomics and immune monitoring services to over 50 major pharmaceutical and biotech clients for more than 15 years. Caprion, a privately-held company, is majority owned by Global Healthcare Opportunities, or GHO Capital Partners LLP. For more information, please visit www.caprion.com

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