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GAITHERSBURG, Md., May 11, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Novavax, Inc. (Nasdaq:NVAX), today announced that Dr. James F. Cummings has been promoted to Vice President, Clinical Development and Translational Medicine. Dr. Cummings joined Novavax as Senior Director of Clinical Development in September 2015, with a specific focus on advancing Novavax’ programs within emerging infectious disease.  Previously, Dr. Cummings served as the Director for Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response System (GEIS) at the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch (AFHSB), Director, Translational Medicine Branch & Division of Regulated Activities at Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR) and Consultant to the U.S. Army Surgeon General for all Medical Research and Development. “In his short tenure at the company, James has shown his ability to constructively organize, motivate and manage complex development programs,” said Stanley C. Erck, President and CEO. “His demonstrated expertise in product development and leadership capabilities earned James the appointment of Project Lead for our nanoparticle influenza vaccine candidate development program, and promotion to Vice President. I am thrilled to congratulate James for his successes here at Novavax.” About Novavax Novavax, Inc. (Nasdaq:NVAX) is a clinical-stage vaccine company committed to delivering novel products to prevent a broad range of infectious diseases. Its recombinant nanoparticles and Matrix-M™ adjuvant technology are the foundation for groundbreaking innovation that improves global health through safe and effective vaccines.


GAITHERSBURG, Md., May 11, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Novavax, Inc. (Nasdaq:NVAX), today announced that Dr. James F. Cummings has been promoted to Vice President, Clinical Development and Translational Medicine. Dr. Cummings joined Novavax as Senior Director of Clinical Development in September 2015, with a specific focus on advancing Novavax’ programs within emerging infectious disease.  Previously, Dr. Cummings served as the Director for Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response System (GEIS) at the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch (AFHSB), Director, Translational Medicine Branch & Division of Regulated Activities at Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR) and Consultant to the U.S. Army Surgeon General for all Medical Research and Development. “In his short tenure at the company, James has shown his ability to constructively organize, motivate and manage complex development programs,” said Stanley C. Erck, President and CEO. “His demonstrated expertise in product development and leadership capabilities earned James the appointment of Project Lead for our nanoparticle influenza vaccine candidate development program, and promotion to Vice President. I am thrilled to congratulate James for his successes here at Novavax.” About Novavax Novavax, Inc. (Nasdaq:NVAX) is a clinical-stage vaccine company committed to delivering novel products to prevent a broad range of infectious diseases. Its recombinant nanoparticles and Matrix-M™ adjuvant technology are the foundation for groundbreaking innovation that improves global health through safe and effective vaccines.


Important to the study's implications, adenosine is derived from adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the molecule that stores the energy needed by the body's cells until they break it up to use it. Scientists have known that both inflammation and aging lead to diminished ATP production (and so lower adenosine levels) in chondrocytes. Until now, they had not linked diminished adenosine levels to osteoarthritis, the commonplace, "wear-and-tear" form of arthritis. Led by researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center, the study found that maintaining high levels of adenosine in rats with damage to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), which is known to lead to osteoarthritis in humans, prevented the rats from developing the disease. If the finding proves to be true in humans, the study authors say adenosine replacement therapy could potentially delay the onset of osteoarthritis and the need for joint replacements. "We found that if adenosine levels decrease, or if the capacity to respond to adenosine diminishes, cartilage starts to degenerate," says study senior investigator Bruce Cronstein, MD, the Dr. Paul R. Esserman Professor of Medicine at NYU Langone. "Our study suggests that diminished ATP and adenosine production are likely contributing factors to the development of osteoarthritis in aging individuals," says Cronstein, who also serves as the director of the Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI), and chief of the Division of Translational Medicine at NYU Langone. The findings suggest that reductions in the number of cartilage-producing cells, and greater risk for osteoarthritis, may be driven not just by lower adenosine levels but also by lower levels of the protein on the surface of chondrocytes designed to receive and pass on adenosine's signal. Adenosine helps to sustain such cells by fitting into a protein called the A2A adenosine receptor on their surfaces, like a key into a lock. Cronstein and colleagues observed that mice lacking the A2A adenosine receptor did not move (walk) as easily or as well as mice with the receptor. Radiologic examination of the knees of mice without the receptor confirmed that they had osteoarthritis. Cronstein and his team also found that levels of adenosine A2A receptors went up on rat chondrocytes when osteoarthritis was present, in what the researchers say was a "failed attempt" to compensate for the loss of adenosine from the energy-processing (metabolic) changes underlying the inflammation. Additional tests in tissue samples from osteoarthritic patients who had joint replacements at NYU Langone found similarly increased levels of adenosine A2A receptors on chondrocytes. When researchers treated mouse chondrocytes with a molecule called IL-1beta, which contributes to the development of osteoarthritis, they found that 39 percent less ATP was produced by the inflamed chondrocytes. They also found 80 percent less expression of ANKH, a molecule that exports ATP, in the IL-1beta-treated cells. Finally, they found that lacking the enzyme involved in turning ATP into adenosine diminished adenosine levels, which led to osteoarthritis in mice. The lack of the enzyme in humans is also known to lead to the disease. When the team administered adenosine packaged in lipid bubbles into rats' ACL injuries, researchers found that the excess adenosine, as mediated by the adenosine A2A receptor, prevented the development of osteoarthritis in the animals. Cronstein says related future therapies, if successful, would prevent or delay the need for some of the million or so joint replacements performed each year, numbers of which are growing in part thanks to obesity, which puts more pressure on joint structures. "Because joints may have to be replaced again and again, if we can put off the need for joint replacement until later in life, odds are that patients will only have to have this done once," says Cronstein. Along with Cronstein, study authors were Carmen Corciulo, Matin Lendhey, Tuere Wilder, Hanna Schoen, Alexander Samuel Cornelissen, Greg Chang, and Oran Kennedy at NYU Langone. The study was funded by National Institutes of Health grants R01 AR 056672 and R01 AR 068593, NYU-HHC Clinical and Translational Science Institute grants UL1 TR 000038-05 and UL1 TR 000038-05S1, and from the Arthritis Foundation. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/rodents-with-trouble-walking-reveal-potential-treatment-approach-for-most-common-joint-disease-300453210.html


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

WASHINGTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--DIA, (founded as the Drug Information Association), announced today keynote speaker Alexander Tsiaras, 11 tracks, more than 160 sessions, and a featured career fair at the DIA 2017 Global Annual Meeting, June 18 to 22 in Chicago, IL. Appropriately themed “Driving Insights to Action”, the DIA 2017 Global Annual Meeting is designed to foster the international exchange of actionable insights to improve health globally through the advancement of lifesaving medicines and technologies. An integral part of the health and life sciences community, this the platform on which all global stakeholders in the drug product development life cycle have an opportunity to converse, debate, and raise questions about the evolution of novel therapies, the pharmaceutical research and development (R&D) landscape, and regulatory challenges to drive action throughout health care product development. With traditional educational sessions and innovative learning experiences, the program includes themed tracks with scientific sessions focused on today’s hottest topics ranging from big data, medical affairs, and clinical operations to patient engagement, clinical trial safety, and value and access. In the keynote address, Interactive Storytelling and Personal Health Data Drives Unprecedented Patient Empowerment, Alexander Tsiaras will share how the fusion of personal stories of disease, powerful patient data, and visceral interactive experiences can drive greater patient engagement and outcomes. “With the changes in governance around the world, the continuing economic uncertainties, the ever-increasing consumer involvement, the regulatory challenges, plus the continuing pressure for even higher quality and innovative products, the life sciences industry is facing myriad challenges,” said Barbara Lopez Kunz, Global Chief Executive, DIA. “It’s important for all stakeholders in this arena to openly discuss these challenges, find ways to overcome them and take action to help move our ecosystem forward. Our global annual meeting provides the essential platform by which to do just that. Insights and outcomes garnered at this meeting will advance innovation to deliver safe, effective, and accessible healthcare products to patients.” DIA 2017 will host over 7,000 professionals from the pharmaceutical, biotechnology and medical device communities from over 50 countries for the five-day conference, which also features a three-day expo with more than 450 exhibiting companies. In addition to health care and life sciences industry professionals, academia, and students, representatives from global regulatory bodies such as: Food and Drug Administration (FDA), European Medicines Agency (EMA), International Coalition of Medicines Regulatory Authorities (ICMRA), Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency (PMDA), Health Canada, The Brazilian Health Regulatory Agency (Anvisa), National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) and Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) will be in attendance. More importantly, these same groups of people will serve as session chairs and speakers, igniting questions, inspiring thought, and driving action. To learn more and register for DIA 2017, visit www.DIAglobal.org/DIA2017. For live updates, attendees and the public should follow and join the conversation on Twitter, @DrugInfoAssn using the hashtag #DIA2017. DIA (founded as the Drug Information Association) is an international, nonprofit, multidisciplinary member association that provides health care product development professionals a neutral and transparent forum for collaboration and the exchange of insights to improve health globally through the advancement of lifesaving medicines and technologies. DIA builds knowledge through, learning solutions (digital and in person training), conferences and insights in the areas of Regulatory Science, Translational Medicine, Patient Engagement and Value and Access for professionals in the pharmaceutical, biotechnology, and medical device communities. DIA is based in Washington, DC (US) with regional offices representing the Americas (Horsham, PA, US); Europe, the Middle East and Africa, (Basel, Switzerland); and Asia (Beijing and Shanghai, China; Mumbai, India; and Tokyo, Japan). For more information, visit www.DIAglobal.org or connect with us on Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, and Instagram.


DUBLIN--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Drug Discovery & Therapy World Congress 2017 (5th in the series) Corporate" conference to their offering. Drug Discovery & Therapy World Congress 2017, scheduled to be held from 10th to the 13th of July 2017, will bring together world's leading scientists in the field of drug discovery and therapy to discuss their latest researches in the exciting setting of Boston. The conference should provide an occasion for the participating scientists not only to present their researches and interact with eminent colleagues but also to enjoy the intellectually stimulating environment of Boston. This unique international conference will provide a platform for all pharmaceutical scientists, internists and primary care physicians to discuss important international breakthroughs in drug discovery and new therapeutics. The focus of the conference will be on the interdisciplinary fields of drug discovery, drug therapy and translational medicine. A similar series of conferences have been held by the organizers in the UAE over the last several years. These events have been highly successful and many top international scientists, including over 22 Nobel Laureates, have presented their work. Throughout the course of the four day conference, you will get an exclusive opportunity to network and be involved in inspiring and interesting discussions of scientists and researchers from the international pharmaceutical, academic and clinical communities. - Exchange ideas and network with leading pharmaceutical scientists and clinicians. - Brings together top international scientists and clinicians presenting cutting-edge discoveries, research and new therapeutic drugs. - This conference aims to span the interdisciplinary fields of pre-clinical and clinical drug discovery and drug therapy and to highlight the burgeoning fields of Translational Medicine - and the major advances from "bench to bedside" research and practice. - Participants can gain direct access to a core audience of professionals and decision makers and can increase visibility through branding and networking at the conference. For more information about this conference visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/3lg2wq/drug_discovery


ATLANTA--Dr. Ming-Hui Zou, director of the Center for Molecular & Translational Medicine and a Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar in Molecular Medicine, has received a five-year, $2.3 million federal grant to study how to reduce tumor growth in lung cancer. In the United States, more people die from lung cancer than any other type of cancer, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In 2013, the most recent year for which statistics are available, 212,584 people were diagnosed with lung cancer and 156,176 people died from lung cancer. As cancer develops, tumor cells release substances that promote the formation of new blood vessels, known as pro-angiogenic factors, by stimulating a response from endothelial cells, which line the inner walls of blood vessels. This leads to increased angiogenesis (the formation of new blood vessels), tumor growth and the spread of cancer. Scientists have developed therapies that target vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a potent angiogenic factor. However, the benefits of anti-VEGF therapies are often temporary because tumors become resistant to this therapy and start inducing new blood vessel formation with other pro-angiogenic factors. As a result, there's an urgent need to find novel targets for treatment. This grant from the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health will help Zou determine the molecular mechanism by which Liver Kinase B1 (LKB1), a tumor suppressor gene, suppresses transcriptional (gene) expression and activity of VEGF, NRP-1 and other pro-angiogenic factors, resulting in a reduction in tumor growth and a restriction in blood supply to tumors. "The completion of this project will allow us to identify that enhancing LKB1 activity or expression is not only beneficial in suppressing cancer progression/metastasis but also in treating ischemic heart diseases," Zou said. The project has three aims. The first is to establish if LKB1 leads to decreased VEGF expression through impeding the activation of transcription, the first step of gene expression, in endothelial cells. The second aim is to establish if LKB1 suppresses NRP-1 and other non-VEGF growth factor-mediated angiogenesis in tumor cells. The third aim is to determine the contribution of LKB1 down-regulation of VEGF and NRP-1 within the vascular niche in mice. An abstract of the grant, 1R01CA213022-01, is available at NIH's Project RePORTer website. For more information about the Center for Molecular & Translational Medicine, visit http://medicine. .


GAITHERSBURG, Md., May 11, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Novavax, Inc. (Nasdaq:NVAX), today announced that Dr. James F. Cummings has been promoted to Vice President, Clinical Development and Translational Medicine. Dr. Cummings joined Novavax as Senior Director of Clinical Development in September 2015, with a specific focus on advancing Novavax’ programs within emerging infectious disease.  Previously, Dr. Cummings served as the Director for Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response System (GEIS) at the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch (AFHSB), Director, Translational Medicine Branch & Division of Regulated Activities at Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR) and Consultant to the U.S. Army Surgeon General for all Medical Research and Development. “In his short tenure at the company, James has shown his ability to constructively organize, motivate and manage complex development programs,” said Stanley C. Erck, President and CEO. “His demonstrated expertise in product development and leadership capabilities earned James the appointment of Project Lead for our nanoparticle influenza vaccine candidate development program, and promotion to Vice President. I am thrilled to congratulate James for his successes here at Novavax.” About Novavax Novavax, Inc. (Nasdaq:NVAX) is a clinical-stage vaccine company committed to delivering novel products to prevent a broad range of infectious diseases. Its recombinant nanoparticles and Matrix-M™ adjuvant technology are the foundation for groundbreaking innovation that improves global health through safe and effective vaccines.


GAITHERSBURG, Md., May 11, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Novavax, Inc. (Nasdaq:NVAX), today announced that Dr. James F. Cummings has been promoted to Vice President, Clinical Development and Translational Medicine. Dr. Cummings joined Novavax as Senior Director of Clinical Development in September 2015, with a specific focus on advancing Novavax’ programs within emerging infectious disease.  Previously, Dr. Cummings served as the Director for Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response System (GEIS) at the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch (AFHSB), Director, Translational Medicine Branch & Division of Regulated Activities at Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR) and Consultant to the U.S. Army Surgeon General for all Medical Research and Development. “In his short tenure at the company, James has shown his ability to constructively organize, motivate and manage complex development programs,” said Stanley C. Erck, President and CEO. “His demonstrated expertise in product development and leadership capabilities earned James the appointment of Project Lead for our nanoparticle influenza vaccine candidate development program, and promotion to Vice President. I am thrilled to congratulate James for his successes here at Novavax.” About Novavax Novavax, Inc. (Nasdaq:NVAX) is a clinical-stage vaccine company committed to delivering novel products to prevent a broad range of infectious diseases. Its recombinant nanoparticles and Matrix-M™ adjuvant technology are the foundation for groundbreaking innovation that improves global health through safe and effective vaccines.


HOUSTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Aravive Biologics today announced the appointment of Stephen L. Eck, M.D., Ph.D. as President and Chief Executive Officer. Dr. Eck was formerly Vice President of Oncology Medical Sciences at Astellas Pharma Global Development, Inc. Ray Tabibiazar, M.D., founding President and CEO of Aravive, remains as Chairman of the company’s Board of Directors. “Stephen has an impressive track-record of oncology drug and biomarker development at prominent pharmaceutical companies, as well as a close relationship to Houston’s M.D. Anderson Cancer Center as a member of the Advisory Board for their oncology Moonshot Program,” said Dr. Tabibiazar. “We welcome his expertise and leadership to the Aravive team as we prepare to advance our lead drug candidate, Aravive-S6, into human clinical testing in 2018.” “I am very excited to be joining Aravive at this point in the company’s development,” said Dr. Eck. “Aravive-S6 is a novel and promising agent that has shown in preclinical trials the potential to improve the treatment of cancer in combination with a wide range of other approaches, including chemotherapeutic drugs, radiation, PARP inhibitors and checkpoint inhibitors. I look forward to helping Aravive realize the full potential that I believe Gas6/AXL inhibition can bring to the treatment of cancer.” Prior to joining Astellas Pharma, Stephen Eck served as Vice President, Translational Medicine & Pharmacogenomics at Eli Lilly and Company, where his group developed the biomarkers and companion diagnostics needed for study-specific decision making and for tailoring biotherapeutics to unique patient populations. Prior to joining Lilly, he served in a variety of oncology and neuroscience drug development leadership roles at Pfizer, Inc. Dr. Eck is a board-certified hematologist, who holds a Ph.D. in chemistry from Harvard University and received his M.D. degree from the University of Mississippi School of Medicine. He serves on the Board of Directors of Luminex Corporation, a Texas-based life sciences company, is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and is Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Personalized Medicine Coalition. Aravive Biologics is a privately held, late pre-clinical stage biopharmaceutical company developing novel, highly selective cancer therapies that treat serious malignancies while sparing normal healthy cells. The company’s lead program is focused on the GAS6/AXL pathway, where activation appears to play a critical role in multiple types of cancer malignancies by promoting tumor metastasis and cell survival. Aravive Biologics has generated strong preclinical data for its lead drug candidate, Aravive-S6, in both acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and solid tumors including ovarian, pancreatic, and breast cancers. The company is based in Houston, Texas, and receives support from the Cancer Prevention & Research Institute of Texas (CPRIT). For more information, please visit our website at http://www.aravive.com. This press release contains forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements contained in this press release include, without limitation, statements regarding the expected contribution of Dr. Eck, and Aravive-S6’s potential to improve the treatment of cancer in combination with a wide range of other approaches, including chemotherapeutic drugs, radiation, PARP inhibitors and checkpoint inhibitors. These forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance and involve a number of unknown risks, assumptions, uncertainties and factors that are beyond Aravive Biologics' control including the ability to successfully integrate Dr. Eck into the Aravive management, and the ability of Aravive-S6 to treat cancer, the ability of Aravive-S6 to demonstrate safety and efficacy, as well as clinical results that are consistent with prior in vitro results, the ability to enroll patients and complete the clinical trials on time and achieve desired results and benefits, the company’s ability to obtain regulatory approvals for commercialization of product candidates or to comply with ongoing regulatory requirements, regulatory limitations relating to the company’s ability to promote or commercialize its product candidates for specific indications, acceptance of its product candidates in the marketplace and the successful development, marketing or sale of products, the company’s ability to maintain its license agreements, the continued maintenance and growth of its patent estate, its ability to establish and maintain collaborations, its ability to obtain or maintain the capital or grants necessary to fund its research and development activities, and its ability to retain its key scientists or management personnel. All forward-looking statements are based on Aravive Biologics' expectations and assumptions as of the date of this press release. Actual results may differ materially from these forward-looking statements. Except as required by law, Aravive Biologics expressly disclaims any responsibility to update any forward-looking statement contained herein, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.


Grammatopoulos D.K.,Translational Medicine
Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology | Year: 2017

G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) have long been at the center of investigations of the neurobiology of depression and mood disorders. Different facets of GPCR signalling pathways, including those controlling monoaminergic and neuropeptidergic hormonal systems are believed to be dysregulated in major depressive and bipolar disorders. Although these receptors are key molecular targets for a variety of therapeutic agents and continue to be the focus of intense pharmaceutical development, the molecular mechanisms activated by these GPCRs and underpin the pathological basis of mood disorders remain poorly understood. This review will discuss some of the emerging regulatory mechanisms of GPCR signaling in the central nervous system (CNS) involving protein-protein interactions, downstream effectors and cross-talk with other signaling molecules and their potential involvement in the neurobiology of psychiatric disease. © 2017.

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