Transgenic Inc.

Kōbe-shi, Japan

Transgenic Inc.

Kōbe-shi, Japan
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— Global Canola Oil Industry Report offers market overview, segmentation by types, application, countries, key manufactures, cost analysis, industrial chain, sourcing strategy, downstream buyers, marketing strategy analysis, distributors/traders, factors affecting market, forecast and other important information for key insight. Companies profiled in this report are Louis Dreyfus Company, ADM, Cargill, Bunge, Richardson Oilseed, Viterra, Al Ghurair, CHS, Pacific Coast Canola (PCC), Oliyar, Wilmar International, COFCO, Chinatex Corporation, Maple Grain and Oil Industry, HSGC, Zhongsheng in terms of Basic Information, Manufacturing Base, Sales Area and Its Competitors, Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017). Split by Product Types, with sales, revenue, price, market share of each type, can be divided into • Cold-pressed Canola Oil • Extracted Canola Oil • Transgenic Canola Oil • Non-transgenic Canola Oil Split by applications, this report focuses on sales, market share and growth rate of Canola Oil in each application, can be divided into • Food Industry • Biofuels • Oleo Chemicals • Other Purchase a copy of this report at: https://www.themarketreports.com/report/buy-now/481957 Table of Content: 1 Canola Oil Market Overview 2 Global Canola Oil Sales, Revenue (Value) and Market Share by Manufacturers 3 Global Canola Oil Sales, Revenue (Value) by Countries, Type and Application (2012-2017) 4 Global Canola Oil Manufacturers Profiles/Analysis 5 North America Canola Oil Sales, Revenue (Value) by Countries, Type and Application (2012-2017) 6 Latin America Canola Oil Sales, Revenue (Value) by Countries, Type and Application (2012-2017) 7 Europe Canola Oil Sales, Revenue (Value) by Countries, Type and Application (2012-2017) 8 Asia-Pacific Canola Oil Sales, Revenue (Value) by Countries, Type and Application (2012-2017) 9 Middle East and Africa Canola Oil Sales, Revenue (Value) by Countries, Type and Application (2012-2017) 10 Canola Oil Manufacturing Cost Analysis 11 Industrial Chain, Sourcing Strategy and Downstream Buyers 12 Marketing Strategy Analysis, Distributors/Traders 13 Market Effect Factors Analysis 14 Global Canola Oil Market Forecast (2017-2022) 15 Research Findings and Conclusion 16 Appendix Inquire more for more details about this report at: https://www.themarketreports.com/report/ask-your-query/481957 For more information, please visit https://www.themarketreports.com/report/2017-2022-global-top-countries-canola-oil-market-report-779176333


Experimental model could be instrumental in testing novel therapies for diseases that now lack treatments WASHINGTON - An off-the-shelf dietary supplement available for pennies per dose demonstrated the ability to reverse cellular damage linked to specific genetic mutations in transgenic fruit flies, an experimental model of genetic mutation-induced renal cell injury that features striking similarities to humans, a Children's National Health System research team reports April 20 in Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. "Transgenic Drosophila that carry mutations in this critical pathway are a clinically relevant model to shed light on the genetic mutations that underlie severe kidney disease in humans, and they could be instrumental for testing novel therapies for rare diseases, such as focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), that currently lack treatment options," says Zhe Han, Ph.D., principal investigator and associate professor in the Center for Cancer & Immunology Research at Children's National and senior study author. Nephrotic syndrome (NS) is a cluster of symptoms that signal kidney damage, including excess protein in the urine, low protein levels in blood, swelling and elevated cholesterol. The version of NS that is resistant to steroids is a major cause of end stage renal disease. Of more than 40 genes that cause genetic kidney disease, the research team concentrated on mutations in genes involved in the biosynthesis of Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), an important antioxidant that protects the cell against damage from reactive oxygen. "This represents a benchmark for precision medicine," Han adds. "Our gene-replacement approach silenced the fly homolog in the tissue of interest - here, the kidney cells - and provided a human gene to supply the silenced function. When we use a human gene carrying a mutation from a patient for this assay, we can discover precisely how a specific mutation - in many cases only a single amino acid change - might lead to severe disease. We can then use this personalized fly model, carrying a patient-derived mutation, to perform drug testing and screening to find and test potential treatments. This is how I envision using the fruit fly to facilitate precision medicine." Drosophila pericardial nephrocytes perform renal cell functions including filtering of hemolymph (the fly's version of blood), recycling of low molecular weight proteins and sequestration of filtered toxins. Nephrocytes closely resemble, in structure and function, the podocytes of the human kidney. The research team tailor-made a Drosophila model to perform the first systematic in vivo study to assess the roles of CoQ10 pathway genes in renal cell health and kidney function. One by one, they silenced the function of all CoQ genes in nephrocytes. As any individual gene's function was silenced, fruit flies died prematurely. But silencing three specific genes in the pathway associated with NS in humans - Coq2, Coq6 and Coq8 - resulted in abnormal localization of slit diaphragm structures, the most important of the kidney's three filtration layers; collapse of membrane channel networks surrounding the cell; and increased numbers of abnormal mitochondria with deformed inner membrane structure. The flies also experienced a nearly three-fold increase in levels of reactive oxygen, which the study authors say is a sufficient degree of oxidative stress to cause cellular injury and to impair function - especially to the mitochondrial inner membrane. Cells rely on properly functioning mitochondria, the cell's powerhouse, to convert energy from food into a useful form. Impaired mitochondrial structure is linked to pathogenic kidney disease. The research team was able to "rescue" phenotypes caused by silencing the fly CoQ2 gene by providing nephrocytes with a normal human CoQ2 gene, as well as by providing flies with Q10, a readily available dietary supplement. Conversely, a mutant human CoQ2 gene from an patient with FSGS failed to rescue, providing evidence in support of that particular CoQ2 gene mutation causing the FSGS. The finding also indicated that the patient could benefit from Q10 supplementation. Video: Using the Drosophila model to learn more about disease in humans Paper: A Personalized Model of COQ2 Nephropathy Rescued by the Wild-Type COQ2 Allele or Dietary Coenzyme Q10 Supplementation


Patent
Transgenic Inc., Kumamoto University and Gunma University | Date: 2017-07-26

The present invention provides a method for detection of an inflammatory reaction, which comprises using a transformant or transgenic non-human animal transfected with a vector comprising a promoter for a gene encoding an inflammatory cytokine, a gene encoding a reporter protein, a gene encoding the inflammatory cytokine, and a gene encoding a proteolytic signal sequence to thereby detect an inflammatory reaction induced upon inflammatory stimulation in the transformant or in the transgenic non-human animal.


Patent
Transgenic Inc., Kumamoto University and Gunma University | Date: 2014-07-31

The present invention provides a method for detection of an inflammatory reaction, which comprises using a transformant or transgenic non-human animal transfected with a vector comprising a promoter for a gene encoding an inflammatory cytokine, a gene encoding a reporter protein, a gene encoding the inflammatory cytokine, and a gene encoding a proteolytic signal sequence to thereby detect an inflammatory reaction induced upon inflammatory stimulation in the transformant or in the transgenic non-human animal.


No statistical methods were used to predetermine sample size. The experiments were not randomized. The investigators were not blinded to allocation during experiments and outcome assessment. To construct the 35S:uORFs –LUC reporter, the 35S promoter and the TBF1 exon1 (including the R-motif, uORF1-uORF2, and the coding sequence of the first 73 amino acids of TBF1) were amplified from p35S:uORF1-uORF2-GUS1 using Reporter-F/R primers, and ligated into pGWB235 (ref. 22) via gateway recombination. The 35S:ccdB cassette–LUC-NOS construct was generated by fusing PCR fragments of the 35S promoter from pMDC140 (ref. 23), the ccdB cassette, and the NOS terminator from pRNAi-LIC24 and LUC from pGWB235 (ref. 22). The 35S:ccdB cassette–LUC-NOS was then inserted into pCAMBIA1300 via PstI and EcoRI and designated as pGX301 for cloning 5′ leader sequences through replacement of the ApaI-flanked ccdB cassette24. Similarly, the 35S:RLUC-HA-rbs terminator construct was made through fusion of PCR fragments of 35S from pMDC140 (ref. 23), RLUC from pmirGLO (Promega, E1330), and rbs terminator from pCRG3301 (ref. 25). The 35S:RLUC-HA-rbs fragment flanked with EcoRI was inserted into pTZ-57rt (Thermo Fisher, K1213) via TA cloning to generate pGX125. The 5′ leader sequences were amplified from the Arabidopsis (Col-0) genomic DNA or synthesized by Bio Basics (New York, USA) and inserted into pGX301 followed by transferring 35S:RLUC-HA-rbs from pGX125 via EcoRI. EFR, PAB2, PAB4, and PAB8 were amplified from U21686, C104970, U10212, and U15101 (from the Arabidopsis Biological Resource Center), respectively, and fused with the amino (N) terminus of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) by PCR. Fusion fragments were then inserted between the 35S promoter and the rbs terminator to generate 35S:EFR–EGFP (pGX664), 35S:EFR (pGX665), and 35S:PAB2–EGFP (pGX694). Information on all plasmids and primers in this study can be found in Supplementary Table 6. Plants were grown on soil (Metro Mix 360) at 22 °C under 12/12-h light/dark cycles with 55% relative humidity. Mutants efr-1 (ref. 6), ers1-10 (a weak gain-of-function mutant; ERS, ethylene receptor-related gene family member)26, ein4-1 (a gain-of-function mutant; EIN4, ethylene receptor-related gene family member)27, wei7-4 (a loss-of-function mutant; WEI7, involved in ethylene-mediated auxin increase)28, eicbp.b (camta 1-3; SALK_108806; EICBP.B, an ethylene-induced calmodulin-binding protein)29, and pab2/4 (ref. 18) and pab2/8 (ref. 18) were previously described; erf7 (SALK_205018; ERF7, a homologue of the ethylene responsive transcription factor gene ERF1) and gcn2 (GABI_862B02) were from the Arabidopsis Biological Resource Center. Transgenic plants were generated using the floral dip method30. Leaves from ~24 3-week-old plants (two leaves per plant; ~1.0 g) were collected. Tissue was fast frozen and ground in liquid nitrogen. Five millilitres of cold polysome extraction buffer (PEB; 200 mM Tris pH 9.0, 200 mM KCl, 35 mM MgCl , 25 mM EGTA, 5 mM DTT, 1 mM phenylmethanesulfonylfluoride (PMSF), 50 μg ml−1 cycloheximide, 50 μg ml−1 chloramphenicol, 1% (v/v) Brij-35, 1% (v/v) Igepal CA630, 1% (v/v) Tween 20, 1% (v/v) Triton X-100, 1% sodium deoxycholate (DOC), 1% (v/v) polyoxyethylene 10 tridecyl ether (PTE)) was added. After thawing on ice for 10 min, lysate was centrifuged at 4 °C/16,000g for 2 min. Supernatant was transferred to 40 μm filter falcon tube and centrifuged at 4 °C/7,000g for 1 min. Supernatant was then transferred into a 2-ml tube and centrifuged at 4 °C/16,000g for 15 min and this step was repeated once. Lysate (0.25 ml) was saved for total RNA extraction for making the RNA-seq library. Another 1 ml of lysate was layered on top of 0.9 ml sucrose cushion (400 mM Tris·HCl pH 9.0, 200 mM KCl, 35 mM MgCl , 1.75 M sucrose, 5 mM DTT, 50 μg ml−1 chloramphenicol, 50 μg ml−1 cycloheximide) in an ultracentrifuge tube (349623, Beckman). The samples were then centrifuged at 4 °C/70,000 r.p.m. for 4 h in a TLA100.1 rotor. The pellet was washed twice with cold water, resuspended in 300 μl RNase I digestion buffer (20 mM Tris·HCl pH 7.4, 140 mM KCl, 35 mM MgCl , 50 μg ml−1 cycloheximide, 50 μg ml−1 chloramphenicol)10 and then transferred to a new tube for brief centrifugation. The supernatant was then transferred to another new tube where 10 μl RNase I (100 U μl−1) was added before 60 min incubation at 25 °C. 15 μl SUPERase-In (20 U μl−1) was then added to stop the reaction. The subsequent steps including ribosome recovery, footprint fragment purification, PNK treatment, and linker ligation were performed as previously reported31. Two and a half microlitres of 5′ deadenylase (NEB) were then added to the ligation system and incubated at 30 °C for 1 h. Two and a half microlitres of RecJ exonuclease (NEB) was subsequently added for 1 h incubation at 37 °C. The enzymes were inactivated at 70 °C for 20 min and 10 μl of the samples were taken as template for reverse transcription (Extended Data Fig. 2). The rest of the steps for the library construction were performed as in the reported protocol31, with the exception of using biotinylated oligos, rRNA1 and rRNA2, for Arabidopsis according to another reported method10. TRIzol LS (0.75 ml; Ambion) was added to the 0.25 ml lysate saved from the Ribo-seq library construction, from which total RNA was extracted, quantified, and qualified using Nanodrop (Thermo Fisher Scientific). Total RNA (50-75 μg) was used for mRNA purification with Dynabeads Oligo (dT) (Invitrogen). Twenty microlitres of the purified poly (A) mRNA was mixed with 20 μl 2× fragmentation buffer (2 mM EDTA, 10 mM Na CO , 90 mM NaHCO ) and incubated for 40 min at 95 °C before cooling on ice. Five hundred microlitres of cold water, 1.5 μl of GlycoBlue, and 60 μl of cold 3 M sodium acetate were then added to the samples and mixed. Subsequently, 600 μl isopropanol was added before precipitation at −80 °C for at least 30 min. Samples were then centrifuged at 4°C/15,000g for 30 min to remove all liquid and air dried for 10 min before resuspension in 5 μl of 10 mM Tris pH 8. The rest of the steps were the same as Ribo-seq library preparation with quality control data shown in Extended Data Fig. 3. To record the 35S:uORFs –LUC reporter activity, 3-week-old Arabidopsis plants were sprayed with 1 mM luciferin 12 h before infiltration with either 10 μM elf18 (synthesized by GenScript) or 10 mM MgCl as Mock. Luciferase activity was recorded in a CCD (charge-coupled device) camera-equipped box (Lightshade Company) with each exposure time of 20 min. For the dual-luciferase assay, Nicotiana benthamiana plants were grown at 22 °C under 12/12-h light/dark cycles. Dual-luciferase constructs were transformed into the Agrobacterium strain GV3101, which was cultured overnight at 28 °C in Luria-Bertani broth supplied with kanamycin (50 mg l−1), gentamycin (50 mg l−1), and rifampicin (25 mg l−1). Cells were then spun down at 2,600g for 5 min, resuspended in infiltration buffer (10 mM 2-(N-morpholino) ethanesulfonic acid (MES), 10 mM MgCl , 200 μM acetosyringone), adjusted to an opitcal density at 600 nm (OD   ) = 0.1, and incubated at room temperature for an additional 4 h before infiltration using 1 ml needleless syringes. For elf18 induction, 10 mM MgCl (Mock) solution or 10 μM elf18 were infiltrated 20 h after the dual-luciferase construct and EFR–EGFP had been co-infiltrated at the ratio of 1:1, and samples were collected 2 h after treatment. For the PAB2–EGFP co-expression assay, Agrobacterium containing a dual-luciferase construct was mixed with Agrobacterium containing the PAB2–EGFP construct at a ratio of 1:5. Leaf discs were collected, ground in liquid nitrogen, and lysed with the PLB buffer (Promega, E1910). Lysate was spun down at 15,000g for 1 min, from which 10 μl was used for measuring LUC and RLUC activity using a Victor3 plate reader (PerkinElmer). At 25 °C, substrates for LUC and RLUC were added using the automatic injector and after 3 s shaking and 3 s delay, the signals were captured for 3 s and recorded as counts per second. For elf18-induced growth inhibition assay, seeds were sterilized in a 2% PPM solution (Plant Cell Technology) at 4 °C for 3 days and sown on MS media (1/2 MS basal salts, 1% sucrose, and 0.8% agar) with or without 100 nM elf18. Ten-day-old seedlings were weighed with ten seedlings per sample. For elf18-induced resistance to Psm ES4326, 1 μM elf18 or Mock (10 mM MgCl ) was infiltrated into 3-week-old soil-grown plants 1 day before Psm ES4326 (OD    = 0.001) infection of the same leaf. Bacterial growth was scored 3 days after infection. For elf18-induced resistance to Psm ES4326 in primary transformants overexpressing PAB2 in the pab2/8 mutant (OE-PAB2), transgenic plants expressing yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) in the WT background were used as control, and both control and OE-PAB2 were selected for basta-resistance and further confirmed by PCR. For MAPK activation, 12-day-old seedlings grown on MS media were flooded with 1 μM elf18 solution and 25 seedlings were collected at the indicated time points. Protein was extracted with co-IP buffer (50 mM Tris, pH 7.5, 150 mM NaCl, 0.1% (v/v) Triton X-100, 0.2% (v/v) Nonidet P-40, protease inhibitor cocktail (Roche), phos-stop phosphatase inhibitor cocktail (Roche)). Antibody information and conditions can be found in Supplementary Table 6. For callose deposition, 3-week-old soil-grown plants were infiltrated with 1 μM elf18. After 20 h of incubation, leaves were collected, decolorized in 100% ethanol with gentle shaking for 4 h, and rehydrated in water for 30 min before stained in 0.01% (w/v) aniline blue in 0.01 M K PO pH 12 covered with aluminium foil for 24 h with gentle shaking. Callose deposition was observed with a Zeiss-510 inverted confocal microscope using a 405 nm laser for excitation and 420–480 nm filter for emission. PAB2–EGFP was amplified from pGX694. GA, G(A) , and G(A) were synthesized using Bio Basics (New York, USA) while poly(A) and G(A) were synthesized by IDT (https://www.idtdna.com/site). The sequences used for in vitro biotin-RNA synthesis can be found in Supplementary Table 6. In vitro transcription and translation were performed using the wheat germ translation system according to the manufacturer’s instructions (BioSieg, Japan). To make biotin-labelled RNA probes, 2 μl of 10 mM biotin-16-UTP (11388908910, Roche) was added into the transcription system. DNase I was then used to remove the DNA template. Biotin-labelled RNA (0.2 nmol) was conjugated to 50 μl streptavidin magnetic beads (65001, Thermo Fisher) according to the manufacturer’s instructions. In vitro synthesized PAB2–EGFP was incubated with biotin-labelled RNA in the glycerol-co-IP buffer (50 mM Tris, pH 7.5, 150 mM NaCl, 2.5 mM EDTA, 10% (v/v) glycerol, 1 mM PMSF, 20 U ml−1 Super-In RNase inhibitor, protease inhibitor cocktail (Roche)). To perform in vivo pull-down experiment, PAB2–EGFP was co-expressed with the elf18 receptor EFR (pGX665) for 40 h in N. benthamiana, which was then treated with Mock or elf18 for 2 h. Protein was extracted with glycerol-co-IP buffer and used in the pull-down assay at 4 °C for 4 h. YFP was expressed as a control. Antibody information and assay conditions can be found in Supplementary Table 6. Arabidopsis tissue (0.6 g) was ground in liquid nitrogen with 2 ml cold PEB buffer. One millilitre of crude lysate was loaded to 10.8 ml 15–60% sucrose gradient and centrifuged at 4 °C for 10 h (35,000 r.p.m., SW 41 Ti rotor). A   absorbance recording and fractionation were performed as described previously32. Polysomal RNA was isolated by pelleting polysomes, and polysomal/total mRNA ratio was calculated as described previously8. About 50 mg of leaf tissue was used for total RNA extraction using TRIzol following the manufacturer’s instructions (Ambion). After DNase I (Ambion) treatment, reverse transcription was performed following the instruction of SuperScript III Reverse Transcriptase (Invitrogen) using oligo (dT). Real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT–PCR) was done using FastStart Universal SYBR Green Master (Roche). Primer sequences can be found in Supplementary Table 6. Read processing and statistical methods were conducted following the criteria illustrated in Extended Data Fig. 4. Generally, Bowtie2 (ref. 33) was used to align reads to the Arabidopsis TAIR10 genome. Read assignment was achieved using HT-Seq34. Transcriptome and translatome changes were calculated using DESeq2 (ref. 35). Transcriptome fold changes (RS ) for protein-coding genes were determined using reads assigned to exon by gene. Translatome fold changes (RF ) for protein-coding genes were measured using reads assigned to CDS by gene. Translational efficiency was calculated by combining reads for all genes that passed reads per kilobase of transcript per million mapped reads (RPKM) ≥ 1 in CDS threshold in two biological replicates and normalizing Ribo-seq RPKM to RNA-seq RPKM as reported12. The criteria used for uORF prediction are shown in Extended Data Fig. 6 and were performed using systemPipeR (https://github.com/tgirke/systemPipeR). The MEME online tool36 was used to search strand-specific 5′ leader sequences for enriched consensuses compared with whole-genome 5′ leader sequences with default parameters. The density plot was presented using IGB37. The nucleotide resolution of the coverage around start and stop codons was performed using the 15th nucleotide of 30-nucleotide reads of Ribo-seq, similar as reported previously10, 38. Whole-transcriptome R-motif search was performed using the FIMO tool in the MEME suite36. LUC/RLUC ratio was first tested for normal distribution using a Shapiro–Wilk test. A two-sided Student’s t-test was used for comparison between two samples. Two-sided one-way or two-way analysis of variance was used for more than two samples, and Tukey’s test was used for multiple comparisons. GraphPad Prism 6 was used for all the statistical analyses. Unless specifically stated, sample size n means the biological replicate and experiment was performed three times with similar results. *P < 0.05, **P < 0.01, ***P < 0.001, and ****P < 0.0001 indicate significant increases; NS, no significance; †††P < 0.001 indicates a significant decrease. The authors declare that the main data supporting the findings of this study are available within the article and its Source Data files. Extra data are available from the corresponding author upon request. The RNA-seq and Ribo-seq data have been deposited in Gene Expression Omnibus under accession number GSE86581.


Safety of 100-plus edible oils thoroughly examined in breakthrough test HONG KONG, CHINA--(Marketwired - May 23, 2017) - Vitargent (International) Biotechnology Ltd. ("Vitargent"), known for applying its proprietary "Transgenic Medaka" and "Zebrafish Fish" Embryo Toxicity (FET) testing technology (Testing 2.0) on food and skincare products, introduces the world's first consumer product safety information platform, Test-it™. The platform uses Testing 2.0 biological testing technology to examine consumer product safety and has published the results of the inaugural test project on 115 types of edible oil originated from Hong Kong, China, Italy, the US and other countries. Test results put 49 types of oil in the Green Fish category, denoting the products are excellent in terms of safety; 23 in the Yellow Fish category, indicating their safety level is basic, and 43 are categorized as Red Fish, with safety at sub-optimal standards. More than 70% of the olive oil samples are categorized as Red Fish, and edible oils from Europe turned out to have the lowest performance, with more than 50% of the samples categorized as Red Fish. Test-it™ hailed as world's first product safety information platform Pioneered by Vitargent, Test-it™ (on www.fishqc.com) is hailed as the first in the world to use Testing 2.0 bio-testing technology on consumer products and provide information on consumer product safety. The technology uses fish embryos to examine product toxicity, an increasingly adopted means for toxicity screening. The goal is to enhance the transparency of consumer product safety and help consumers make informed safer product choices based on objective scientific data. Vitargent's Founder and Chief Commercial Officer Eric Chen said: "Traditional Testing 1.0 and existing regulations only set the basic requirements for market entry. Test-it™ regularly samples different food items and daily necessities, by purchasing them from supermarkets, chain stores and online stores as a consumer. After Testing 2.0 screening, individual products are categorized as Green Fish, Yellow Fish or Red Fish to help consumers identify product safety." Test-it™ benchmarks against the international product safety standards of the European Union (EU), the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), as well as the national safety standards of the US, Japan and China. Horizontal analyses against similar products are also conducted. Vitargent's Chief Executive Officer Jimmy Tao said: "Test-it™ is intended to commend excellent companies and products, and motivate below-standard companies and brands to actively improve their production process. This will give consumers greater confidence in making purchases and help brands develop long-term benefits. In the initial stage, Test-it™ will publish all Green Fish (excellent) products, and will contact the product manufacturers and suppliers of Yellow Fish and Red Fish products to discuss improvement plans." Test-it™ releases safety findings of 100-plus edible oils The first type of Test-it™ product is edible oil, a daily necessity marred by gutter oil scandals. Vitargent purchased 115 types of edible oil from major supermarket chains, including ParknShop, Wellcome, DCH Food Mart, AEON, City'Super, Fusion and Market Place by Jasons. Samples included products of internationally renowned brands such as Knife Oil, Filippo Berio, Lion & Globe, Casino and others from Hong Kong, Mainland China, Italy, the US and other countries. Based on the test results, 49 of the 115 samples are categorized as Green Fish, 23 as Yellow Fish and 43 as Red Fish. Vitargent tested 14 categories of commonly used edible oils. The test showed that coconut oil, olive oil, flaxseed oil, canola oil and sesame oil, generally believed to be healthier by Hong Kong consumers, had below average results. Only one out of 5 coconut oil samples, or 20%, is categorized as Green Fish, while 2 samples (40%) are Yellow Fish and 2 (40%) are Red Fish. Similarly, only 7 out of 44 olive oil samples tested (16%) are Green Fish, 7 (16%) are Yellow Fish, and 30 (68%) are Red Fish. All the flaxseed oil, Canola oil and sesame oil tested are categorized Red Fish. Edible oils from Europe categorized lowest, and price does not reflect safety By production origin, edible oils made in Europe are lowest in ranking. More than half of the tested products (57%) are Red Fish, and only 26% are categorized Green Fish. Oils made in Asia performed better. About 20% of the Hong Kong brands in the test are Red Fish while more than 50% are categorized Green Fish, which are safe choices for consumers. The test results also show that expensive oil may not be safer. The median price of the 115 samples is HK$87.4 per litre. Of the 40 brands priced at above $130 per litre, six are categorized Green Fish, five Yellow Fish and 29 Red Fish. Of the 31 samples in the price range of $50-$130 per litre, 13 are categorized Green Fish, eight Yellow Fish and 10 Red Fish. Among the 44 samples priced below HK$50 per litre, 30 are categorized Green Fish, 10 Yellow Fish and four Red Fish. The cheapest oil costs $15 per litre while the most expensive oil, from Italy, costs 140 times more at HK$2,084 per litre. In the random sampling, two edible oil samples that Vitargent bought off the shelf had passed their use-by date. One of these samples is categorized Red Fish, indicating toxicity level higher than some known gutter oil. Test-it™ technology surpasses standard edible oil indicators Mr Tao was astounded by the results. "Theoretically, edible oils in the market should have passed traditional regulatory checks before they were put on the shelf. However, Test-it™ shows up all toxicants in the products," he said. "Under current regulations, edible oil is tested for a limited number of factors such as Benzo(a)pyrene, aflatoxins, acid value, peroxide value, total polar compounds and heavy metals. However, there may be other substances such as highly toxic lipid peroxidation products, pesticide residue, plant toxins and preservatives not covered by the regulatory standards. Excessive intake of these substances may have adverse effects on the human body, or cause cancer over the long-term. Test-it™ uses cutting-edge biological testing technology to cover extra potential harmful substances outside of the regulatory standards. This contributes to enhancing consumer product safety significantly." Revolutionary Testing 2.0 technology traces all harmful substances The general public is deeply concerned with food and consumer products safety as scandals of rotten meat, gutter oil, high lead content in drinking water and cancer-causing substances in skincare and cosmetics continue to make headlines. WHO and UN reports suggest we are surrounded by more than 100,000 chemicals in our daily life1. Some are linked with health problems like cancer, infertility, precocious puberty, obesity, neurological disorders2. However, the precision rate of traditional chemical toxicity testing, still at the Testing 1.0 level, is as low as 20%3. Due to cost and time constraints, only 5 to 10 toxicants can be screened at one time through such traditional test methods. Other harmful substances not covered by standard testing will be missed in the screening. This means products that have passed traditional testing methods may still contain harmful substances not covered by existing screening practices. This may pose serious threats to consumers. Prof. Ian Cotgreave, advisor of Vitargent's international scientists committee and professor of toxicology of Karolinska Institutet, said: "The world faces very serious safety problems with food and consumer products. However, existing standard tests fail to effectively screen a number of toxicants and estrogens harmful to public health. Vitargent's patented Zebrafish Embryo Toxicity Test technologies have been extensively applied in pharmaceutical R&D in the past 10 years. As 84% of genes known to be associated with human diseases have a Zebrafish counterpart4, Zebrafish can be used to mimic human metabolic system. Therefore, substances harmful to Zebrafish might also be harmful to human beings. When a Zebrafish embryo is exposed to toxicants, it will develop adverse reaction within 48 hours. Vitargent's Testing 2.0 technology is a new beacon in the world. It can prompt industries to be more conscious of product safety and redefine global consumer product safety rules." Vitargent is the only ISO17025 accredited company in Asia that provides FET testing technologies. The test results are officially recognised in more than 100 countries. The patented technology has been adopted by international certification service SGS and TÜV (Technischer Überwachungsverein). TÜV's executive VP of the food services cluster Stanley Hung welcomed Vitargent's Testing 2.0 technology. "We appreciate Vitargent's leading position in fish embryo testing technologies and how such technologies complement existing chemical testing. We also believe in the capabilities of its international scientists committee and its market development potential. We will endeavour to promote the cutting-edge technologies to different industries and government organisations, and contribute to enhancing overall product safety." Vitargent plans to test a different product category every month in the next 12 months, some examples may include coffee, ice-cream, milk, yogurt, face cream, facial masks, lipstick, lip balm, foundation, toothpaste, baby food and baby skincare products. Results of the tests will be published on the Test-it™ platform. About Vitargent Established in 2010, Vitargent is a startup backed by institutional investors and is shaking up the traditional product testing safety standards. Our vision is "Smarter Testing, Safer Products, Better World". The company's international scientists committee is formed of world-class scientists from the US, Canada, Germany, Sweden, Japan, Singapore and Hong Kong. These committee members join together to establish and promote various international standards. Vitargent is an award-winning company with both local and international recognitions, which include The Grand Prix of the 43rd International Exhibition of Inventions of Geneva, HSBC Young Entrepreneur Awards, Lee Kuan Yew Global Business Plan Competition, Korean Woman Inventor Award, Middle East International Invention Fair Gold Medal, WIPO Gold medal for inventors, Hong Kong Awards for Industries-Technology Achievement, and The Economist Innovation and Awards Summit. Our technology was featured as the only pioneering innovation from Hong Kong at The World Economic Forum. We are recognised as a "Technology Showcase Programme over the past decade" by the Hong Kong government, and Unreasonable Impact Asia Pacific by Unreasonable Group and Barclays. Our mission is to combine our scientific expertise with social responsibility to improve consumer product safety and protect our environment; and to help our clients create differentiation with safer and better products through innovative science, affordable prices and great service. Our team has developed proprietary testing technologies based on transgenic Medaka Fish and Zebrafish embryos. In 2013 Vitargent received the international standard ISO17025 Accreditation, and is the only test centre in Asia that can provide fish embryo toxicity (FET) testing with testing results officially recognised in more than 100 countries. It is now serving international testing organisations, leading international cosmetics groups, food and beverage conglomerates and various government departments around the world. With the firm support of these entities, the technology is being developed as regional and international standards. 1 Substance Registry Services Fact Sheet, available at ofmpub.epa.gov/sor_internet/registry/substreg/educationalresources. 2 WHO & UNEP. State of the science of endocrine disrupting chemicals-2012. Available at http://www.who.int/ceh/publications/endocrine/en/ 3 Frequently asked questions about MICROTOX® for drinking water surveillance. 4 Howe, K. et al. The zebrafish reference genome sequence and its relationship to the human genome. Nature 496, 498-503 (2013). Vitargent genetically transfers Nobel Prize winning fluorescent proteins into Medaka embryos, stabilised to more than 10 generations in eight years. The Transgenic Medaka Eleuthero embryo based Estrogen Equivalent Test is a patented technology exclusive to Vitargent. Estrogenic Endocrine Disruptors (including pesticides, veterinary drugs, antibiotics, hormones, plasticisers, persistent organic pollutants etc) disrupt the endocrine system, confirmed to cause health issues including cancers, infertility, precocious puberty, IQ reduction, neurological disorders and diabetes. WHO, the UN and USEPA believe that endocrine disruptors have become the third leading threat to human, biodiversity and environment, after the greenhouse effect of global warming and depletion of the ozone layer. After pretreatment, samples are tested with transgenic fish embryos. When chronic toxicants are detected, the embryo emits green florescent light in various luminous intensity. Florescence intensity can quantify toxicants, enabling evaluation of human health risks according to WHO/FAO standard. Zebrafish embryo toxicity test technologies made cover story in world-renowned science magazine Nature. According to the National Institutes of Health, 84% of genes known to be associated with human diseases have a Zebrafish counterpart. Therefore, any substance that is toxic to Zebrafish embryos are likely toxic to human. Zebrafish is proven to have a capacity to screen over 1,000 toxicants, and is being widely utilised in biomedical safety and efficacy evaluation. The presence of toxin will cause abnormal symptoms in fish embryos, such as head tumour, tail tumour, heart swelling and even immediate death in serious conditions. After pretreatment, products are tested with Zebrafish embryos to identify the level of concentration that will cause 50% of fatality of embryos in the test (known as LC50). Definition of fatality in the tests is regulated and conforms with ISO15088 and OECD TG236 standards.


Patent
National Cancer Center and Trans Genic Inc. | Date: 2011-09-09

An antibody against mutant -actinin-4 having an amino acid sequence with at least one amino acid residue substitution in the region between position 245 and 263 in the amino acid sequence of -actinin-4, wherein the antibody recognizes all or a part of the substituted amino acid residue(s) in the region.


Patent
Trans Genic Inc. and National Cancer Center | Date: 2014-07-16

An antibody against mutant -actinin-4 having an amino acid sequence with at least one amino acid residue substitution in the region between position 245 and 263 in the amino acid sequence of -actinin-4, wherein the antibody recognizes all or a part of the substituted amino acid residue(s) in the region.


Patent
Trans Genic Inc. and Kumamoto University | Date: 2015-02-04

The present invention provides embryonic stem cells obtainable from an embryo of an immunodeficient mouse which is deficient in both Rag2 and Jak3 genes by culture in the presence of a GSK3 inhibitor and an MEK inhibitor, as well as a transgenic mouse, which is created with the use of these embryonic stem cells.


Patent
Trans Genic Inc. and Kumamoto University | Date: 2012-03-27

The present invention provides embryonic stem cells obtainable from an embryo of an immunodeficient mouse which is deficient in both Rag2 and Jak3 genes by culture in the presence of a GSK3 inhibitor and an MEK inhibitor, as well as a transgenic mouse, which is created with the use of these embryonic stem cells.

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