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Transgenex Nanobiotech, Inc.

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TAMPA, FL, United States
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Nair R.R.,University of South Florida | Nair R.R.,Transgenex Nanobiotech, Inc. | Padhee S.,University of South Florida | Padhee S.,Transgenex Nanobiotech, Inc. | And 7 more authors.
Critical Reviews in Therapeutic Drug Carrier Systems | Year: 2017

There have been remarkable improvements in our understanding of cancer biology. However, therapeutic improvements, with a few exceptions, have been minimal. Also, significant challenges remain in translating fundamental discoveries in cancer biology and genetics into effective drugs and cures. Traditional two-dimensional monolayer cell cultures lack predictive value, resulting in a >90% failure rate of compounds in clinical trials. A developing cancer is a symbiotic tissue consisting of cancer cells, including cancer stem cells (CSCs), and cohabitating with the components of its environment to form a tumor microenvironment (TME) niche. Throughout the process of tumorigenesis, ubiquitous autocrine and paracrine signaling between the cellular and noncellular components of the TME dictates the milieu and structure of this niche. Arising out of such interactions are the cancer cell’s phenotypic characteristics, such as stemness, epithelial mesenchymal transformation (EMT), and drug resistance which in turn greatly affect the response of these cells to drug therapy. For these reasons, in order to delineate the mechanism of tumorigenesis and in the process discover drugs that will have greatest impact on tumor growth, it becomes imperative to study the cancer cell in context of its microenvironment. In the present review, we enumerate the advantages of three- and four-dimensional (3D and 4D) cell cultures and describe the various cell culture platforms that are being used to study tumorigenesis in vitro. These culture systems will not only aid in the study of tumor progression complexities in a cost-effective and rapid manner; they also are expected to facilitate the discovery and delivery of therapeutic regimens that will have more success making it to the clinic. ©2017 Begell House, Inc. © 2017 Begell House, Inc.


Kumar A.,University of South Florida | Jena P.K.,University of South Florida | Behera S.,Transgenex Nanobiotech, Inc. | Lockey R.F.,University of South Florida | And 3 more authors.
Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology, and Medicine | Year: 2010

A major problem associated with drug therapy is the inability to deliver pharmaceuticals to a specific site of the body without causing nonspecific toxicity. Development of magnetic nanoparticles and techniques for their safe transport and concentration in specific sites in the body would constitute a powerful tool for gene/drug therapy in vivo. Furthermore, drug delivery in vitro could improve further if the drugs were modified with antibodies, proteins, or ligands. For in vivo experiments, magnetic nanoparticles were conjugated with plasmid DNA expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and then coated with chitosan. These particles were injected into mice through the tail vein and directed to the heart and kidneys by means of external magnets of 25 gauss or 2kA-kA/m. These particles were concentrated in the lungs, heart, and kidneys of mice, and the expression of EGFP in these sites were monitored. The expression of EGFP in specific locations was visualized by whole-body fluorescent imaging, and the concentration of these particles in the designated body locations was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. In another model system, we used atrial natriuretic peptide and carcinoembryonic antigen antibodies coupled to the chitosan-coated magnetic nanoparticles to target cells in vitro. The present work demonstrates that a simple external magnetic field is all that is necessary to target a drug to a specific site inside the body without the need to functionalize the nanoparticles. However, the option to use magnetic targeting with external magnets on functionalized nanoparticles could prove as a more efficient means of drug delivery. From the Clinical Editor: This paper addresses targeted drug delivery with magnetic nanoparticles. The authors demonstrate that a simple external magnetic field is sufficient to target a drug to specific sites in the body without the need for functionalized nanoparticles, at least in selected organs and diseases. © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


Alwarappan S.,University of South Florida | Cissell K.,Transgenex Nanobiotech, Inc. | Dixit S.,University of South Florida | Li C.-Z.,Florida International University | Mohapatra S.,University of South Florida
Journal of Electroanalytical Chemistry | Year: 2012

Graphene has remarkable electrochemical properties that make it an ideal material for constructing bio-sensors. Herein, we report on a chitosan-modified graphene platform for the electrochemical detection of changes in DNA sequences. For this purpose, graphene synthesized chemically and characterized by Raman spectroscopy and Transmission electron microscopy, was covalently modified with positively charged chitosan to facilitate the immobilization of a single-stranded DNA 'capture' oligonucleotide. The covalent attachment of chitosan to graphene was confirmed by FT-IR spectroscopy and then the capture DNA was immobilized on to the chitosan modified graphene electrode. Then, the target DNA (complementary or mismatched 'mutant' DNA) was applied to the electrode and cyclic voltammetry was performed. The results of the voltammetric experiments indicate that the chitosan modified graphene electrodes immobilized with ssDNA+complementary DNA exhibit a significantly higher magnitude of redox peak current than the chitosan modified graphene electrodes immobilized with the non-complementary mutant DNAs. Together, these results demonstrate that the chitosan-graphene platform provides a rapid, stable and sensitive detection of mismatched DNA and has the potential to be used for point-of-care diagnostic tests for specific DNA mutations associated with disease conditions. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Boyapalle S.,University of South Florida | Boyapalle S.,Transgenex Nanobiotech, Inc. | Xu W.,University of South Florida | Xu W.,Transgenex Nanobiotech, Inc. | And 6 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2015

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) types 1 and 2 (HIV-1 and HIV-2) are the etiologic agents of AIDS. Most HIV-1 infected individuals worldwide are women, who acquire HIV infections during sexual contact. Blocking HIV mucosal transmission and local spread in the female lower genital tract is important in preventing infection and ultimately eliminating the pandemic. Microbicides work by destroying the microbes or preventing them from establishing an infection. Thus, a number of different types of microbicides are under investigation, however, the lack of their solubility and bioavailability, and toxicity has been major hurdles. Herein, we report the development of multifunctional chitosan-lipid nanocomplexes that can effectively deliver plasmids encoding siRNA(s) as microbicides without adverse effects and provide significant protection against HIV in both in vitro and in vivo models. Chitosan or chitosan-lipid (chlipid) was complexed with a cocktail of plasmids encoding HIV-1-specific siRNAs (psiRNAs) and evaluated for their efficacy in HEK-293 cells, PBMCs derived from nonhuman primates, 3-dimensional human vaginal ectocervical tissue (3D-VEC) model and also in non-human primate model. Moreover, prophylactic administration of the chlipid to deliver a psiRNA cocktail intravaginally with a cream formulation in a non-human primate model showed substantial reduction of SHIV (simian/human immunodeficiency virus SF162) viral titers. Taken together, these studies demonstrate the potential of chlipid-siRNA nanocomplexes as a potential genetic microbicide against HIV infections.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 225.00K | Year: 2014

Not Available


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 225.00K | Year: 2014

Not Available


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 299.99K | Year: 2013

Not Available


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: National Institutes of Health | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 225.00K | Year: 2015

Not Available


Trademark
Transgenex Nanobiotech, Inc. | Date: 2016-07-31

Cell culture apparatus for medical use, namely, culture plates.


PubMed | Transgenex Nanobiotech, Inc. and University of South Florida
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2015

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) types 1 and 2 (HIV-1 and HIV-2) are the etiologic agents of AIDS. Most HIV-1 infected individuals worldwide are women, who acquire HIV infections during sexual contact. Blocking HIV mucosal transmission and local spread in the female lower genital tract is important in preventing infection and ultimately eliminating the pandemic. Microbicides work by destroying the microbes or preventing them from establishing an infection. Thus, a number of different types of microbicides are under investigation, however, the lack of their solubility and bioavailability, and toxicity has been major hurdles. Herein, we report the development of multifunctional chitosan-lipid nanocomplexes that can effectively deliver plasmids encoding siRNA(s) as microbicides without adverse effects and provide significant protection against HIV in both in vitro and in vivo models. Chitosan or chitosan-lipid (chlipid) was complexed with a cocktail of plasmids encoding HIV-1-specific siRNAs (psiRNAs) and evaluated for their efficacy in HEK-293 cells, PBMCs derived from nonhuman primates, 3-dimensional human vaginal ectocervical tissue (3D-VEC) model and also in non-human primate model. Moreover, prophylactic administration of the chlipid to deliver a psiRNA cocktail intravaginally with a cream formulation in a non-human primate model showed substantial reduction of SHIV (simian/human immunodeficiency virus SF162) viral titers. Taken together, these studies demonstrate the potential of chlipid-siRNA nanocomplexes as a potential genetic microbicide against HIV infections.

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