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Calgary, Canada

Patent
TransCanada | Date: 2013-08-30

The disclosure describes methods, devices and tools useful in the non-destructive inspection and the characterization of mechanical damage such as dents in pipelines. Methods, devices and tools described herein make use of a strain severity indication combined with a material loss indication such as magnetic flux leakage to determine whether a dent comprises at least one of a crack, a gouge and corrosion. The characterization of the mechanical damage in dents of pipes may be used to determine whether and when any corrective or preventive action should be carried out.


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"Many large Canadian companies are financing legal action and lobbying against President Barack Obama’s climate change plan, putting the public and their investors at risk, said a new report released on Monday by an investment services organization. The report said that major companies such as BMO Financial, Cenovus, Resolute Forest Products, Suncor and TransCanada Corp are all members of U.S. trade associations that have aggressively lobbied and taken the U.S. government to court to block its Clean Power Plan. The support for the legal action, led by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, also runs counter to public statements and positions taken by many of these companies, which are making investments to tackle rising carbon pollution, the report said. But the report suggested that these companies could help the planet move forward in tackling dangerous climate change by paying more attention to what these lobby groups are doing with their money and membership fees. The companies are now allowing their money to be used to block regulations that are designed to reduce heat-trapping carbon pollution from American coal electricity plants - one of the world's largest sources of greenhouse gases, the report warned."   Mike De Souza reports for the National Observer March 13, 2016.


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"OTTAWA — TransCanada said on Wednesday that it would seek $15 billion in damages over the Obama administration’s decision to cancel the company’s Keystone XL pipeline project. The company is taking the unusual step of suing through the North American Free Trade Agreement, calling the decision 'arbitrary and unjustified.' The Canadian business also filed a lawsuit in Houston asking that the decision be overturned. 'TransCanada has been unjustly deprived of the value of its multibillion-dollar investment by the U.S. administration’s action,' the company said in a statement. 'Rather, the denial was a symbolic gesture based on speculation about the (false) perceptions of the international community regarding the administration’s leadership on climate change.'" Ian Austen reports for the New York Times January 6, 2016.


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An anti-oil tanker sign is pictured near a demonstration against the proposed Kinder Morgan pipeline on Burnaby Mountain in Burnaby, British Columbia November 17, 2014. Kinder Morgan wants to nearly treble Trans Mountain's capacity to carry 890,000 barrels per day of crude from landlocked Alberta, to Burnaby, British Columbia, where it can be loaded on to tankers and shipped to lucrative Asian refining markets. Alberta's carbon-intensive oil sands producers are desperate for improved access to international markets for their heavy crude, which is among the cheapest in the world and was priced at about $16.50 a barrel outright late Thursday afternoon. But the C$5.4 billion ($3.79 billion) project has run into fierce environmental and aboriginal opposition. British Columbia Environment Minister Mary Polak said Kinder Morgan had failed to provide the National Energy Board (NEB), a federal regulator, with an adequate plan to prevent or respond to an oil spill. In 2012 the province's premier, Christy Clark, outlined five conditions that any company wanting to build pipelines in British Columbia would need to meet to win approval from her Liberal government. These included a "world-leading" marine and land oil spill prevention, response and recovery practices. "We have not seen evidence that convinces us that those five conditions have been met," Polak told reporters. The British Columbia government did not entirely rule out the possibility of Kinder Morgan meeting their requirements in future, adding that it will continue to evaluate the project. "It does not close the door on them meeting that test in the future," Polak said. Kinder Morgan is confident that it will be able to satisfy British Columbia's conditions by the time the regulatory process is complete, it said in a statement. It could not meet all the requirements such as Aboriginal treaty rights alone and needed "multiple parties" to work together, the company said. Kinder Morgan filed a final written argument for the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project with Canadian regulators in December. The opposition to Trans Mountain's expansion comes after U.S. President Barack Obama in November rejected TransCanada Corp's Keystone XL pipeline in a victory for environmentalists. The same month, Canada's recently elected Liberal government said it will impose an oil tanker ban on British Columbia's northern coast, effectively slamming the door on Enbridge Inc's Northern Gateway pipeline.


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Canada's Environment Minister Catherine McKenna (L) and Natural Resources Minister Jim Carr take part in a news conference in Ottawa, Canada, January 27, 2016. The Liberal government issued the rules on the grounds that public trust needed to be restored in the process for assessing big energy projects. Proponents say that after U.S. President Barack Obama's denial of the Keystone XL pipeline, all-Canadian projects are needed so the country's oil can reach its east and west coasts and fetch higher prices abroad. "All we're saying here is that Canadians deserve to have trust in their environmental assessment process or else no projects will go ahead," Environment Minister Catherine McKenna told a news conference. "That doesn't mean that no project is going to go ahead, it just means we have to do a proper review because this is the 21st century and that is the way you get resources to market." The rules are designed to take greater account of environmental impacts and indigenous groups' view for the two pipelines, which are opposed by environmentalists and some communities but backed by industry. McKenna also said the government would separately calculate direct and upstream greenhouse gas emissions linked to the projects. She declined to explain how much weight would be given to the climate change effects, saying there would be no maximum fixed for each project, and she said it would only be one of many factors the government would take into account in determining whether a project was in the national interest. She said no existing project would be required to go back to square one. The rules push back the deadline for the government to decide on Trans Mountain to December 2016 from August, with a review by the national energy regulator still to be done by May. Ottawa extended the period for the regulator's review and subsequent government decision of the Energy East pipeline to 27 months from the currently mandated 18 months. Alberta Environment Minister Shannon Phillips said the province's ability to access energy markets is "crucial." "If these new rules will allow the issues to be heard and then to get to a decision, then they will have helped the process," she stated. TransCanada said it needed time to review the rules but supported delivering resources to market in the "safest and most environmentally sound way possible."

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